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Colorado

The Building Blocks of State Climate Policy

COLORADO

Colorado has passed a number of meaningful climate bills over the last few legislative sessions, including HB19-1261, which set statewide GHG emissions reduction targets. However, key areas remain unaddressed or have only minimal progress to-date.

Select a sector or economy-wide priority

Scroll down to view the outstanding legislative actions needed for this state or click on an image below to jump directly to a specific sector or economy-wide priority.

Industry (22%)

Emissions-intensive industrial processes include the production of cement, steel, and petrochemical products, and the extraction, refining, and processing of fossil fuels. States can set standards and spur innovation to move towards cleaner processes. At the same time, states can work to address environmental injustice: Black Americans are 75% more likely to live near polluting industrial facilities, leading to higher rates of health problems from fossil fuels.

Legislative Action

What is it?

What are the benefits?

Who else has done it?

Examples

Enact industrial emissions standards: Methane

Methane is released when drilling for oil and gas, mining for coal, in landfills, wastewater treatment, and cattle farming. Methane is 56 times more potent than CO2 and is about 10% of US greenhouse gas emissions. States can set methane reduction targets, tighten flaring and venting regulations, increase monitoring and inspections, and more.

- Reduces the one of the most potent greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Thus, standards that decreases methane emissions can make a dramatic, immediate impact in slowing global warming.

3 states (CA, CO, UT) have strong oil and gas regulations that apply to existing sources.

- Colorado SB181 (2019) requires the Oil and Gas Conservation Commission to revisit its existing rules and consider stricter requirements for methane leak detection and repair, pipeline inspection, emissions from ”pneumatic tools,” and more.
- California SB1383 (2015-2016) establishes a goal of reducing methane by 40%, HFCs by 40%, and anthropogenic black carbon by 50% below 2013 levels by 2030.

Enact industrial emissions standards: HFCs

HFCs are used as refrigerants, foam-blowing agents and aerosol propellants in industrial processes. HFCs can be nearly 10,000 times more potent than CO2 and are about 3% of US GHG emissions. States can adopt HFC limits based on former federal HFC rules and set reduction targets.

- Reduces the one of the most potent greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Thus, standards that decreases HFC emissions can make a dramatic, immediate impact in slowing global warming.

15 states have taken action to curb specific HFC uses.

- California (SB1383 2016-2017) and Vermont (S30 2019-2020) passed legislative mandates to reduce overall HFC emissions by 40% from 2013 levels by 2030.
- California, Vermont, Washington, Virginia, and New Jersey passed legislation to adopt HFC limits based on former EPA rules.

Establish a Buy-Clean Standard

Governments purchase large amounts of steel, concrete, and chemicals. A Buy-Clean Standard requires government agencies to consider suppliers' emissions when purchasing materials for infrastructure projects.

- Supports American jobs in domestic manufacturing industries. Have been widely supported by labor unions.
- Changes industrial behavior to give preference to products with the lowest lifecycle emissions.

- California has a Buy Clean program.
- Washington, Oregon, and Minnesota have introduced Buy Clean legislation.

The Buy Clean California Act (AB262 2017) requires state agencies to consider the embedded carbon emissions of industrial products like steel and glass when contracting for state-funded infrastructure projects. It also requires contractors who bid on state infrastructure projects to disclose the GHG emissions data for certain materials they use. The bill was strongly supported by labor unions, business and industry leaders, and environmental groups.

Save money and reduce energy waste by enacting and expanding Energy Efficiency Resource Standards

Energy Efficiency Resource Standards increase energy efficiency by requiring utilities to procure a percentage of their future electricity and natural gas needs using energy energy efficiency measures.

- Saves people money, particularly low-income households: The typical household can save 25% on utility bills with efficiency measures. This will particularly help low-income households, who spend three times greater proportion of their income on their energy bills than other homes.
- Reduces energy use: States with an EERS achieved average annual incremental savings of 1.2% of retail electricity sales. By comparison, states without an EERS achieved 0.3%.

28 states have implemented EERS programs, although not all are stringent enough.

- Vermont H40 (2015-2016) establishes a Renewable Energy Standard requiring utilities to reduce customers' fossil fuel use by 2% of utility's annual sales starting in 2017 and increasing 0.67% annually, reaching 12% in 2032.
- New Jersey A3723 (2018-2019) requires each utility to implement efficiency measures to reduce electricity usage by 2% and natural gas usage by 0.75% annually.

Provide financial incentives to encourage low-carbon alternatives

Current low-carbon alternatives for industrial processes can be costly. Governments can offset the cost with financial incentive and subsidies, whether through loan guarantees, direct grants, feed-in tariffs, etc.

- Lowers the cost of low-carbon industrial technologies.
- Stimulates clean technology and market innovation.

See example.

New York’s proposed Low Embodied Carbon Concrete Leadership Act (2019) would create a tax credit for low-carbon concrete and require states to preferentially consider low-carbon concrete in state projects.

Create jobs, stimulate private investment, and help homeowners and business save money on electricity bills

- Pass Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) enabling legislation and support PACE program development
- Establish a statewide Revolving Loan Fund (RLF)
- Contribute to the establishment or expansion of statewide or local Green Banks or Clean Energy Funds (CEFs)
- Fund Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) efforts

See Electricity section for more information on these policies.

See Electricity section for more information on these policies.

See Electricity section for more information on these policies.

Electricity (27%)

Clean electricity is the backbone for cutting emissions across all sectors. Technology and innovative policy have made it the fastest decarbonizing sector in the U.S. It has also spurred immense job growth – wind and solar are the fastest growing jobs in the nation, with nearly four million Americans employed in energy efficiency and clean energy. These best-practice policies will create jobs and spur investment in your state.

Legislative Action

What is it?

What are the benefits?

Who else has done it?

Examples

Increase renewable energy on the grid by enacting a renewable portfolio standard

Renewable Portfolio Standards, or Clean Energy Standards, set benchmarks for the production of renewable or clean electricity statewide (ex. 50% renewable by 2030, 100% clean by 2045).

- Effective decarbonization: Since 2000, nearly half of all renewable energy growth in the US has been due to RPS and CES.
- Creates rapid job growth through carveouts for specific resources, like solar or offshore wind.

29 states and DC have a RPS or CES. 15 of them are 100% targets.

Hawaii HB623 (2015) increases the state's RPS to:
- 30% by Dec 31, 2020
- 70% by Dec 31, 2040
- 100% by Dec 31, 2045
New York S6599 (2019-2020) and Washington SB5116 (2019-2020) establish 100% economy-wide targets.

Increase renewables and modernize the grid by upgrading transmission, distribution, and storage

America's power grid is decades-old and aging. Grid modernization refers to upgrades in the grid’s transmission, distribution, and storage infrastructure. It makes the electricity system more resilient, while better integrating new renewable energy and storage resources.

- Helps us put more clean electricity on the grid
- Creates rapid job growth: Transmission investments can create 150,000 to 200,000 jobs each year and stimulate $30 to $40 billion in annual economic activity.
- Creates high-quality jobs: Workers in grid modernization earn a median hourly wage of $24.50, compared to the national median wage of $19.14. - Protects against natural disasters: Weather-related outages cost the US up to $33 billion each year. But, every $1 spent to mitigate damage avoids $6 of disaster response costs.

5 states have storage targets. In 2017, more than 35 bills related to grid modernization passed in over 16 states.

- Virginia S966 (2018) increases utility investment in renewable energy, grid modernization, undergrounding power lines, energy efficiency, and demand response.
- New Mexico HB233 (2020) directs agencies to develop a roadmap for energy grid modernization to establish a competitive grant program to support implementation of eligible grid modernization project.
- Maryland SB573 (2019) creates an energy storage pilot program.
- Texas Competitive Renewable Energy Zones (CREZ) transmission projects have saved $1.7 billion per year in production costs and drastically driven down electricity costs through increased renewable energy on the grid.

Streamline permitting of renewable energy projects

The permitting process for renewable energy projects can be costly and time-intensive: for solar, it can can take 3-5 years to complete. Standardized permitting processes can streamline this step and get renewables on the grid faster.

- Helps put more clean electricity on the grid by reducing costs and wait-times.
- Creates rapid job growth.
- Stimulates investment in rural communities, where many renewable projects are sited.
- Reduces costs: Standardized permitting process for residential systems can reduce costs by $1 billion over 5 years.

At least 5 states (California, Massachusetts, Colorado, New York, and Vermont) have enacted legislation to streamline this process

- New York S7508B (2020) creates a new office to oversee development of renewable energy and introduces a single forum for permitting review.
- California AB2188 (2013-2014) requires all local governments to adopt an ordinance that creates an expedited, streamlined permitting process for rooftop solar installations under 10 kW.

Save money and reduce energy waste through Energy Efficiency Resource Standards (EERS)

Energy Efficiency Resource Standards increase energy efficiency by requiring utilities to procure a percentage of their future electricity and natural gas needs using energy energy efficiency measures.

- Saves people money, particularly low-income households: The typical household can save 25% on utility bills with efficiency measures. This will particularly help low-income households, who spend three times greater proportion of their income on their energy bills than other homes.
- Reduces energy use: States with an EERS achieved average annual incremental savings of 1.2% of retail electricity sales. By comparison, states without an EERS achieved 0.3%.

28 states have implemented EERS programs, although not all are stringent enough.

- Vermont H40 (2015-2016) establishes a Renewable Energy Standard requiring utilities to reduce customers' fossil fuel use by 2% of utility's annual sales starting in 2017 and increasing 0.67% annually, reaching 12% in 2032.
- New Jersey A3723 (2018-2019) requires each utility to implement efficiency measures to reduce electricity usage by 2% and natural gas usage by 0.75% annually.

Encourage distributed renewable energy generation through Net Energy Metering (NEM) and Community Solar

Net Energy Metering lets homeowners sell electricity produced by their solar panels back to the grid. Community solar allows individuals who don’t have access to rooftop solar to subscribe to a nearby solar project and receive credits for the electricity it produces.

- Net metering can determine the viability of solar energy taking hold in a state.
- Encourages solar deployment by creating direct potential bill savings for customers. Net metering saves about 5- 15% of participant’s utility bills.

- 38 states require utilities to offer NEM, but with widely with varying efficacy.
- 16 states have passed legislation enabling community solar, but only 4 have active programs.

- South Carolina HB3659 (2019-2020) lifts the state’s 2% cap on net metering, streamlines the contract process for small power producers, and bolsters utility customer rights.
- Arkansas SB145 (2019) makes fundamental changes to distributed generation policy to expand net metering in Arkansas.
- Minnesota’s community solar program, created from HF729 (2013- 2014), is the most successful in the nation.
- New Jersey A3723 (2018) mandates the creation of the Community Solar Energy Pilot Program. The program, established by the Board of Public Utilities in 2019, has been lauded for strong provisions prioritizing low- and moderate-income customers.

Align utility incentives with climate goals through Performance-Based Ratemaking (PBR) and decoupling

Performance-based ratemaking is a utility business model that ties utility revenue to performance (on metrics like efficiency, customer service, and emissions reduction targets) rather than capital investment. “Decoupling” divorces utility revenue from the volume of electricity sold, thus removing disincentives for efficiency measures

- Incentivizes utilities to make beneficial investments for customers, grid health, and clean energy policy objectives.
- Can incentivize utilities to invest in low-income energy efficiency upgrades.

- 19 states and DC have seen recent legislative and/or regulatory developments on performance-based ratemaking.
- 24 states and DC have decoupling policies.

- Hawaii leads the US in performance-based ratemaking: It is the only state to set a deadline, in SB2939 (2018), for the implementation of financial incentives and penalties, making its performance mechanisms enforceable.
- Nevada SB300 (2019) directs state regulators to explore an alternative ratemaking process, including performance incentives and decoupling mechanisms.
- Illinois SB1652 (2011) creates performance incentive mechanisms that allows utilities to invest billions in grid modernization.

Consider the Social Cost of Carbon (SCC) in energy decisions

The Social Cost of Carbon is a dollar-estimate of the economic damages of climate change from carbon emissions. States can direct utilities to consider this cost in planning and operations.

- Ensures decision-making reflects the damages that will be caused by climate change.

13 states use the SCC in energy-related analysis.

- Colorado SB19-236 (2019) directs the Public Utilities Commission to evaluate the cost of CO2 emissions and promulgate rules to require public utilities, when submitting filings, to include the cost.
- Washington Administrative Code requires the Public Utilities Commission to consider “the cost of risks associated with environmental effects including emissions of carbon dioxide” when applying a Lowest Reasonable Cost test.

Make utilities more accountable by creating Intervenor Compensation Programs (ICPs)

Intervenor Compensation Programs compensate advocates for representing their community’s interests in public utilities commission proceedings, thus increasing access and representation in agency rule-making.

- Makes utilities more accountable to public interest.
- Leads to lower costs and cleaner electricity: California’s ICP has saved $354 million (more than 10x the cost of the program).

See examples.

- California Public Utilities Code §1801-1812 (1981) specifies that the state’s ICP provides compensation, usually funded by the utility in question at the proceeding, to representatives of residential or small commercial utility customers participating in Commission proceedings.
- Oregon Intervenor Funding Agreement (2018) outlines the state’s ICP, which requires that organizations representing utility customers be granted the financial resources to participate fairly in Public Utility Commission proceedings.
- Wisconsin Stat. §196.31 (1983) governs the state’s ICP, allocating up to $300,000 in annual grants to organizations representing community members at the Commission.

Provide financial incentives to encourage clean energy and energy efficiency

Financial incentives, such as tax credits and rebates, can directly reduce the cost of solar, energy efficiency upgrades, and renewable systems for consumers and producers.

- Encourages renewable growth by reducing market barrier access and creating direct bill savings.
- Can expand low-income communities' access to clean energy and efficiency upgrades.

The Federal government and many states, cities, and utilities provide financial incentives for clean energy and EE upgrades.

- California AB693 (2015-2016) allocates $100 million annually to the Solar on Multifamily Affordable Housing Program, which puts solar on multifamily affordable housing and allows low-income tenants to use the energy produced, reducing their utility bills.
- Illinois SB2814 (2016) updates the state’s Solar Renewable Energy Credit program, which pays solar panel owners.
- New York’s Megawatt Block Solar Incentive provides strong up-front discounts for commercial and residential rooftop solar panels.

Promote and enable Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs)

Energy Savings Performance Contracts enable building owners to contract with Energy Services Companies (ESCOs), which perform energy upgrades that are then paid for by the resultant electricity bill savings. Policies to boost ESPC adoption include: authorizing them for public agencies, establishing monitoring offices, and conducting community education and outreach.

- Lowers upfront cost and barriers to adoption of energy upgrades.
- Saves consumers money through efficiency upgrades.
- Drives clean energy investment and creates jobs: ESPCs in 10 states have driven more than $3.4 billion in investments and reduced carbon emissions by 488,000 tons.

- All 50 states and DC allow companies to offer ESPCs, but success varies.
- CO, HI, MA, PA, UT, WA, and TX have strong ESPC programs.

- Texas’s ESPC mechanisms, overseen by the State Energy Conservation Office (SECO), are growing rapidly. Various codes govern the state's ESPCs; of particular importance, Code §2166.406 requires that SECO develop guidelines and review ESPCs.
- Colorado's Energy Office runs the state's long-standing ESPC program. The program saves 193 million kWh of electricity and $34.2 million of utility costs per year. Much of the success of the program depends on Rev. Stat. §24-30-2001 through §24-30-2003, which enable ESPCs for state agencies and universities.

PACE programs allow a property owner to finance the up-front cost of energy efficiency or clean energy upgrades and then pay the costs back over time. They are enabled by the state and run by local governments or PACE organizations.

- Saves people and businesses money.
- Creates jobs and drives clean energy investment: As of 2019, PACE programs have financed $800 million in commercial upgrades.

- 36 states and DC have passed PACE-enabling legislation.
- 24 states and DC have active PACE programs.

California has heavily utilized PACE programs to meet its aggressive GHG reduction targets. In 2013, the state authorized the $10 million PACE Loss Reserve Program to increase availability of residential PACE financing. The HERO program has resulted in more than 14,000 tons of emissions reductions and over $6 million in utility savings through 5,600 projects; CaliforniaFirst, the nation’s largest PACE program, is backed by $250 million of private capital.

Establish a statewide Revolving Loan Fund (RLF)

Revolving Loan Funds are state or local-run pools of capital from which loans can be made for clean energy and energy efficiency projects. These funds are “revolving” because as loans are repaid, the capital is then re-loaned for another project.

- Saves people and businesses money and reduces barriers to adoption by lowing the upfront cost of energy upgrades.
- Drives clean energy investment and creates jobs: As of 2016, there was over $1.7 billion available in RLF financing.

RLFs or credit enhancement programs are operating in 35 states.

- Texas Loan Star has provided over $250 million in funding as of 2013 for clean energy and efficiency upgrades. It has saved people and businesses $299 million and saved 3 million tons of CO2 emissions.
- California AB78 (2020) establishes the Climate Catalyst Revolving Loan Fund to provide low-cost financing for clean energy projects.

Establish or expand statewide or local Green Banks or Clean Energy Funds (CEFs)

Green banks and Clean Energy Funds provide clean energy projects with access to low-cost capital by blending public, private, and philanthropic capital. Green banks and CEFs can be run by governments or by independent entities in collaboration with governments.

- Saves people and businesses money and reduces barriers to adoption by lowing the upfront cost of energy upgrades.
- Proven job creators.
- Drives private investment: Green Banks have driven 3x more private investment for every $1 of public money.

Green banks and CEFs are deployed in several states, including in Nevada, Florida, and Washington.

- Connecticut SB1243 (2011) establishes the Connecticut Green Bank to promote investment in clean energy and EE.
- The New York Clean Energy Fund is an integral component of meeting the state’s aggressive renewable energy goals. The 10-year, $5B CEF aims to mobilize private investment and deliver $39B in customer bill savings over its lifetime. At least $245M must be invested in initiatives that benefit low-to mod. income communities.

Fund Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) Efforts

RD&D drives advances in clean energy technology. By leveraging resources in the public and private sectors, state governments can continuously foster collaboration in RD&D.

- Spurs innovation and cuts renewable energy costs: For example, due to RD&D, solar prices declined 99.6% in 39 years.

Many states and institutions collaborate to create RD&D programs.

Legislative Action

What are the benefits?

Virginia Clean Economy Act
HB1526 (2020)

  1. Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS): Establishes 100% carbon-free RPS for the state's two largest utilities: Dominion Energy (achieve by 2045) and for Appalachian Power (achieve by 2050); Sets carveouts that target: 5,200 MW of offshore wind by 2034; 2,700 MW of storage by 2035 (for Dominion); 400 MW storage by 2035 (for Appalachian Power); Requires nearly all coal plants to close by the end of 2024
  2. Energy Efficiency Resource Standard (EERS): Establishes the first mandatory EERS for investor-owned utilities (IOUs), replacing previous voluntary goals
  3. Net Energy Metering (NEM): Increases the NEM cap from 1% to 6% of peak load forecast for IOUs, allowing more customers to benefit from net metering (the ability to sell excess solar electricity back to the utility), and thus driving the adoption of distributed solar in VA.
  4. Social Cost of Carbon (SCC): Requires utilities to incorporate the “social cost of carbon” when considering new fossil fuel investments.
  5. Justice: Requires agencies to prepare a report every three years, detailing the impact of the clean energy transition on vulnerable communities; Directs half of the state’s cap-and-trade auction proceeds to energy efficiency upgrades for low-income Virginians and 45% to flood mitigation and coastal resilience efforts, with a set-aside for disadvantaged communities; Creates a “Percentage of income Payment Program” that caps the amount low-income communities pay for electricity; Prioritizes hiring local workers from historically disadvantaged communities and advances apprenticeship and job training programs.

Washington Clean Energy Transformation Act
SB5116 (2019-2020)

  1. Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS): Establishes an RPS of carbon-neutral by 2030 and 100% clean energy by 2045. No coal by 2025
  2. Align Utility Incentives: Requires utilities to consider equitable distribution of benefits, reduction of burdens to vulnerable communities, short-
    term and long-term public health and environmental benefits, and energy resilience and security.
  3. Social Cost of Carbon (SCC): Requires utilities consider the SCC in all their decisions.
  4. Justice: Requires utilities to (1) conduct a Cumulative Impact Analysis to identify vulnerable communities and (2) Make funds available for energy assistance to low-income households, including direct bill reductions, weatherization, energy efficiency upgrades, and more. They must track and report program results every two years.
  5. Jobs: Provides a tiered system of tax exemption for clean energy projects that meet certain workforce requirements.

Buildings (12%)

From construction to heating and cooling to electricity use, buildings are big energy users. In total, buildings account for 40% of US greenhouse gas emissions. (12% of those emissions are not covered by other sectors). State Legislators have a central role in decreasing these emissions -- and doing so will create jobs, reduce air pollution, and pave a path towards a healthier, more resilient society.

Legislative Action

What is it?

What are the benefits?

Who else has done it?

Examples

Update energy codes to the most recent energy efficiency standards

Building energy codes are the most common state building efficiency policy. They set minimum efficiency and electrification requirements for designing, constructing and renovating buildings. The most common code that states adopt is the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). In some states, the legislature can require local governments to adopt them; in “home rule states,” legislatures can adopt building codes, but cannot require local governments to.

- Creates job growth: Upgrading and retrofitting buildings will require a large dedicated workforce. It’s estimated California’s building decarbonization policies will lead to 100,000 new jobs by 2045.
- Reduces emissions: Building energy codes are estimated to save 800 MMT of CO2 by 2030, equivalent to removing 145 million vehicles from roads.
- Saves money: Building energy codes are estimated to save owners over $15 billion annually by 2030.

26 states have adopted statewide building energy codes. 12 of the 26 have adopted the 2018 IECC or equivalent standards for residential or commercial buildings.

- Utah HB218 (2019) updates the state building code to require commercial building compliance with the 2018 IECC.
- Nebraska LB405 (2019) updates the state energy code to require minimum compliance with the 2018 IECC. Additionally, the new law requires local governments to notify the state energy office within 30 days upon modifying local codes to delete certain portions of the 2018 IECC (Nebraska is a home-rule state).

Decarbonize buildings by enacting building energy performance standards

Performance standards set long-term goals to reduce building energy consumption or greenhouse gas emissions (ex. reduce building emissions 40% below 1990 by 2030). Updating building codes can help states achieve them.

- Creates job growth: Upgrading and retrofitting buildings will require a large dedicated workforce.
- Reduces emissions by ensuring improvements in energy performance.
- Provides flexibility to building owners: Owners can use whatever technologies and operational strategies they decide are most effective to meeting the target.

3 states (CA, WA, DE) and DC have building energy performance standards.

- California AB3232 (2017-2018) directs the California Energy Commission assess the feasibility of reducing emissions from new and existing buildings by 40% below 1990 levels by 2030.
- Delaware's Energy Conservation Code requires the state's Energy Officer to establish programs to promote the construction of zero net energy homes. By 2026, all new residential building construction in Delaware must be net-zero energy capable.

Empower local governments to set stronger codes by adopting stretch codes

In addition to setting building energy codes, states can also encourage local governments to go above and beyond in solving climate change. They do this by allowing “stretch codes”: voluntary energy codes that are more aggressive than the state building code baseline.

- Aligns market actors: Motivates manufacturers and distributors to compete for future market share by making future base code requirements known in advance.
- Aligns utility incentive programs: Utilities can provide incentives and education and training efforts that match future code requirements.

7 states have adopted stretch codes.

- Rhode Island adopted a stretch code to encourage the construction of Zero-Energy Ready Homes.
- Massachusetts’ 2009 Stretch Code (an appendix to their "base" building code) aimed to mitigate climate change effects by giving municipalities the option to adopt the code -- an option that >75% of them took.

States can adopt building codes and stretch codes that require new construction to be wired to support electric vehicle charging infrastructure near parking spaces, and/or have solar panels installed. States can also provide resources to cities seeking to enact residential and commercial building codes for electric vehicle- and solar- readiness.

- Prepares states for widespread electric vehicle (EV) adoption by ensuring EV owners have a place to charge and reducing range anxiety.
- Saves money: It much more cost-effective to require new construction have charging infrastructure and solar panels upon construction, versus retrofit them later.

Cities in over two dozen states require new construction have capacity for EV charging stations. Several cities and the state of CA require solar on new buildings.

- Vermont’s Residential and Commercial Building Energy Code include a solar-ready residential stretch code and EV charging requirements in the base code.
- Washington Administrative Code requires 5% of parking spaces in new buildings to be equipped with EV charging infrastructure, excluding occupancies with fewer than 20 parking spots.
- Hawaii Rev. Stat. §196-7.5 prohibits multi-unit dwellings from preventing a unit owner from placing an EV charging system on or near the owner's parking stall.

Save money and reduce energy waste through Energy Efficiency Resource Standards (EERS)

Energy Efficiency Resource Standards increase energy efficiency by requiring utilities to procure a percentage of their future electricity and natural gas needs using energy energy efficiency measures.

- Saves people money, particularly low-income households: The typical household can save 25% on utility bills with efficiency measures. This will particularly help low-income households, who spend three times greater proportion of their income on their energy bills than other homes.
- Reduces energy use: States with an EERS achieved average annual incremental savings of 1.2% of retail electricity sales. By comparison, states without an EERS achieved 0.3%.

28 states have implemented EERS programs, although not all are stringent enough.

- Vermont H40 (2015-2016) establishes a Renewable Energy Standard requiring utilities to reduce customers' fossil fuel use by 2% of utility's annual sales starting in 2017 and increasing 0.67% annually, reaching 12% in 2032.
- New Jersey A3723 (2018-2019) requires each utility to implement efficiency measures to reduce electricity usage by 2% and natural gas usage by 0.75% annually.

Enact and update appliance efficiency standards

Appliance standards sets minimum energy efficiency requirements for appliances. Federal preemption prevents states from setting standards for federally regulated products, but states are free to set standards for appliances that are not subject to national standards.

- Reduces emissions efficiently: By setting energy efficiency standards at the manufacturer level, appliance makers remove the most inefficient products from the market.
- Saves money: As of 2015, national appliance standards have saved US households and business $80 billion in utility bills.

16 states have adopted statewide appliance efficiency standards.

- Colorado HB19-1231 (2019-2020) is often referred to by advocates as “the best energy and water savings policy you’ve never heard of.” The bill adopts the state's first comprehensive appliance standards for 15 products. It also protects against the repeal of federal appliance standards for lightbulbs.
- Nevada AB54 (2019-2020) protects against the repeal of federal appliance standards for light bulb, safeguarding $85 million in consumer savings.

Provide financial incentives to encourage clean energy and energy efficiency

Financial incentives, such as tax credits and rebates, can directly reduce the cost of solar, energy efficiency upgrades, and renewable systems for consumers and producers.

- Encourages renewable growth by reducing market barrier access and creating direct bill savings.
- Can expand low-income communities' access to clean energy and efficiency upgrades.

The Federal government and many states, cities, and utilities provide financial incentives for clean energy and efficiency upgrades.

- California AB693 (2015-2016) allocates $100 million annually to the Solar on Multifamily Affordable Housing Program, which puts solar on multifamily affordable housing and reduces utility bills for low-income tenants.
- Missouri Rev. Stat. §143.121 allows homeowners to take an income tax deduction for home energy audits and efficiency improvements.
- California SB1477 (2017-2018) directs agencies to develop two programs (BUILD and TECH) to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from buildings. BUILD was allocated $80 million to provide financial incentives to develop all-electric homes, $60 million of which will go to low-income homes.

Adopt benchmarking and transparency requirements

Benchmarking is the practice of comparing a building’s energy performance to itself or similar buildings. Transparency means disclosing this information to purchasers, tenants, and the public. These policies help advocates and decisionmakers direct their efforts.

- Benchmarking allows and encourages building owners and operators to identify cost-effective efficiency investments and verify energy savings.
- Transparency helps purchasers and leasers make more informed decisions about the total cost of owning a home.

10 states and DC require building owners to benchmark or report energy usage.

Washington Clean Buildings Act (HB1257 2019) requires utilities to disclose benchmarking data for large commercial buildings. It also requires buildings owners to provide that information to potential buyers, lessees, and lenders, among other requirements (see case study).

Promote and enable Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs)

Energy Savings Performance Contracts enable building owners to contract with Energy Services Companies (ESCOs), which perform energy upgrades that are then paid for by the resultant electricity bill savings. Policies to boost ESPC adoption include: authorizing them for public agencies, establishing monitoring offices, and conducting community education and outreach.

- Lowers upfront cost and barriers to adoption of energy upgrades.
- Saves consumers money through efficiency upgrades.
- Drives clean energy investment and creates jobs: ESPCs in 10 states have driven more than $3.4 billion in investments and reduced carbon emissions by 488,000 tons.

- All 50 states and DC allow companies to offer ESPCs, but success varies.
- CO, HI, MA, PA, UT, WA, and TX have strong ESPC programs.

- Texas’s ESPC mechanisms, overseen by the State Energy Conservation Office (SECO), are growing rapidly. Various codes govern the state's ESPCs; of particular importance, Code §2166.406 requires that SECO develop guidelines and review ESPCs.
- Colorado's Energy Office runs the state's long-standing ESPC program. The program saves 193 million kWh of electricity and $34.2 million of utility costs per year. Much of the success of the program depends on Rev. Stat. §24-30-2001 through §24-30-2003, which enable ESPCs for state agencies and universities.

PACE programs allow a property owner to finance the up-front cost of energy efficiency or clean energy upgrades and then pay the costs back over time. They are enabled by the state and run by local governments or PACE organizations.

- Saves people and businesses money.
- Creates jobs and drives clean energy investment: As of 2019, PACE programs have financed $800 million in commercial upgrades.

- 36 states and DC have passed PACE-enabling legislation.
- 24 states and DC have active PACE programs.

California has heavily utilized PACE programs to meet its aggressive GHG reduction targets. In 2013, the state authorized the $10 million PACE Loss Reserve Program to increase availability of residential PACE financing. The HERO program has resulted in more than 14,000 tons of emissions reductions and over $6 million in utility savings through 5,600 projects; CaliforniaFirst, the nation’s largest PACE program, is backed by $250 million of private capital.

Establish a statewide Revolving Loan Fund (RLF)

Revolving Loan Funds are state or local-run pools of capital from which loans can be made for clean energy and energy efficiency projects. These funds are “revolving” because as loans are repaid, the capital is then re-loaned for another project.

- Saves people and businesses money and reduces barriers to adoption by lowing the upfront cost of energy upgrades.
- Drives clean energy investment and creates jobs: As of 2016, there was over $1.7 billion available in RLF financing.

RLFs or credit enhancement programs are operating in 35 states.

- Texas Loan Star has provided over $250 million in funding as of 2013 for clean energy and efficiency upgrades. It has saved people and businesses $299 million and saved 3 million tons of CO2 emissions.
- California AB78 (2020) establishes the Climate Catalyst Revolving Loan Fund to provide low-cost financing for clean energy projects.

Establish or expand statewide or local Green Banks or Clean Energy Funds (CEFs)

Green banks and Clean Energy Funds provide clean energy projects with access to low-cost capital by blending public, private, and philanthropic capital. Green banks and CEFs can be run by governments or by independent entities in collaboration with governments.

- Saves people and businesses money and reduces barriers to adoption by lowing the upfront cost of energy upgrades.
- Proven job creators.
- Drives private investment: Green Banks have driven 3x more private investment for every $1 of public money.

Green banks and CEFs are deployed in several states, including in Nevada, Florida, and Washington.

- Connecticut SB1243 (2011) establishes the Connecticut Green Bank to promote investment in clean energy and EE.
- The New York Clean Energy Fund is an integral component of meeting the state’s aggressive renewable energy goals. The 10-year, $5B CEF aims to mobilize private investment and deliver $39B in customer bill savings over its lifetime. At least $245M must be invested in initiatives that benefit low-to mod. income communities.

Prioritize low-income energy efficiency, upgrades, and protections

- Low-income residents spend a large- and economically harmful - amount of their income on energy bills. States can help low-income residents decrease bills by financing energy efficiency and clean energy improvements.
- Federal programs like the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) and Low-income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) provide funding to states for low-income energy assistance, but they are massively oversubscribed and would benefit from additional state funding.
- States can also ensure that investments don’t result in gentrification.

- Saves people money, particularly low-income households: Low-income households spend three times greater proportion of their income on their energy bills than other homes.
- Creates jobs: The Federal WAP supports 8,500 jobs, services 35,000 homes every year, and saves households on average over $283 annually.

The Federal government funds WAPs and LIHEAPs in every state. Some states provide additional funding, including California and New York.

- Washington’s 100% clean energy law (SB5116 2019-2020) requires all utilities in the state make funds available for energy assistance to low-income households.
- California AB1232 (2017-2018) increases coordination between the Low-income Weatherization Program and public health programs addressing issues in homes of vulnerable residences. It also directs state energy efficiency funds to improve the habitability of low-income residences.

- California Low-Income Weatherization Program provides low-income homes with PV systems and efficiency upgrades at no cost.

- California AB1482 (2019-2020) creates and expands anti-displacement protections for tenants.

Legislative Action

What are the benefits?

Washington Clean Buildings Act
HB1257 (2019)

1. Performance Standards, Benchmarking, and Transparency: Adopts energy performance standards for existing commercial buildings exceeding 50,000 square feet; Requires these buildings to adopt energy management plans that include operations and maintenance improvements, energy efficiency audits, and investments in efficiency measures; Requires utilities to disclose benchmarking data for these buildings and requires buildings owners to provide that information to potential buyers, lessees, and lenders.
2. Energy Codes: Requires the state’s building code be updated every three years to achieve a 70% reduction in energy use in new constructions by 2031.
3. Electric Vehicle-ready Buildings: Require electric vehicle charging capability at all new buildings that provide on-site parking
4. Energy Efficiency Resource Standard (EERS): Requires utilities to establish a natural gas conservation target every two years and consider the social cost of carbon in decision-making.
5. Financial Incentives: Creates a $75 million early action incentive fund for retrofit projects that exceed energy intensity targets.

Transportation (28%)

Transportation is the leading source of emissions in the U.S. Cleaning up the way we get around will dramatically cut unhealthy pollution, save billions of dollars, and improve quality of life. States can work towards clean transportation by joining existing multi-state programs, and investing in robust electric vehicle charging networks, public transportation, and walkable, bikeable communities.

Legislative Action

What is it?

What are the benefits?

Who else has done it?

Examples

Adopt the Advanced Clean Car Low-Emission Vehicle (LEV) standards & Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) regulations

States can adopt standards set by California’s Advanced Clean Car Program:
- LEV standards set limits on the amount of greenhouse gas emissions and co-pollutants vehicles can emit. Under the Clean Air Act Section 177, states can either adopt the federal emission standard or the stricter California standard.
- ZEV regulations require automakers to sell a certain percentage of ZEVs (including battery electric, hydrogen fuel cell, and plug-in hybrids) by specific benchmark dates.

- Reduces air pollution and improves public health: California estimates that the LEV and ZEV standards will result in cars emitting 75% less air pollution that harms our health and 40% less carbon pollution by 2025, compared to 2012 model year vehicles.
- Provides automakers flexibility to apply any technology they choose to reduce emissions.
- Encourages market innovation and spurs domestic manufacturing.

- 14 states and DC have adopted the LEV emissions standards.

- 12 states have adopted the ZEV regulation.

- Maryland SB103 (2007) created the Clean Cars Program, which adopted CA's LEV and ZEV standards for all new gasoline and diesel vehicle starting with model year 2011.
- Connecticut PA04-84 (2004) directs the the Commissioner of Environmental Protection to adopt CA's LEV standards for vehicles starting with model year 2008.

- Washington SB5811 (2019-2020) adopts California's ZEV Program. The standard will significantly reduce emissions from transportation, up to 10% by 2035.

Ensure utilities invest in electric vehicle infrastructure by requiring utility Transportation Electrification Plans

Developing a Transportation Electrification Plan is a first step for utilities to prepare for and advance EV adoption in their service area. States can authorize or direct utilities to file these plans, which often include direct utility infrastructure deployment, incentive programs, new rate options, and customer education and outreach.

- Increases EV infrastructure investment: Electric utilities are currently investing $1.4 billion in programs that accelerate the electrification of transportation: nearly $1 billion is in programs that prioritize under-served communities.

- Utilities can benefit from increase in electric vehicle charging.

5 states directed utilities to develop transportation electrification plans in the 2019 legislative session.

- New Mexico HB521 (2019) directs utilities to file transportation electrification plans by January 2021.
- Washington HB1512 (2019) authorizes municipal utilities to file transportation electrification plans and provide outreach and investment in the electrification of transportation infrastructure.
- California SB350 (2015-2016) orders the PUC to direct the state's six investor-owned electric utilities to file applications for programs that "accelerate widespread transportation electrification.”

Encourage the Governor to join regional efforts in medium- and heavy-duty vehicle electrification

Medium- and heavy-duty vehicles account for 23% of transportation greenhouse gas emissions. They include school buses, public transit buses, freight, and other fleet vehicles. 15 states and DC have signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) to eliminate toxic air pollution from new medium- and heavy-duty truck and bus sales by 2050 (30% by 2030).

- Spurs domestic manufacturing and encourages market innovation.
- Improves public health, particularly in disadvantaged communities: NOx pollution from heavy duty vehicles contributes to respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, and is concentrated in low-income communities and communities of color.

15 states and DC signed the MOU, committing to phase out emissions from heavy-duty vehicles

- California's Advanced Clean Trucks Regulation is the world's first zero-emission commercial truck requirement. The rule requires truck makers to sell an increasing number of clean, zero-emission trucks in CA. 15 states and DC signed an MOU following CA’s lead.
- New York A11340 (2006) requires all heavy-duty diesel vehicles owned by state agencies, authorities and contracts to be retrofitted or replaced to decrease diesel emissions.

Leverage government's purchasing power by enacting Green State Fleets

States can set requirements for the procurement of zero-emission vehicles by state agencies and municipalities. This can help governments leverage their buying power to lower the costs of adoption.

- Leverages buying power to lower costs.
- Encourages market innovation and spurs domestic manufacturing.
- Reduces air pollution and improves public health.

See examples.

- Oregon SB1044 (2019) requires all light-duty vehicles owned or leased by the state to be electric by 2029.
- Maryland HB1255 (2019) requires that all school buses purchased by county boards of education be ZEVs beginning in October 2022. It also creates a $600,000 grant program to assist school districts in adding ZEVs to their fleets of school buses.

Remove legal barriers to charging stations

Legal barriers to EV charging stations include outdated building codes and permitting processes and onerous public utility regulations. States can streamline these processes to facilitate widespread charging stations.

- Removes barriers to widespread adoption of charging infrastructure.
- Provides charging station more control over their operations.

32 states have adopted public utility exemptions (7 did in the 2019 legislative session).

- Hawaii Rev. Stat. §196-7.5 prohibits multi-unit dwellings from preventing a unit owner from placing an EV charging system on or near the owner's parking stall.
- Montana HB456 (2019) expands EV charging infrastructure by authorizing utilities to sell electricity to third-party charging station operators and exempting charging stations from classification as public utilities.
- North Carolina H329 (2019) allows charging operators to resell electricity without being regulated as a public utility.

Provide financial incentives to encourage electric vehicle (EV) adoption

Financial incentives, such as tax
credits and rebates, can directly
reduce the cost of EVs and charging
stations for consumers and
producers.

- Incentivizes electric vehicle adoption by making EVs more affordable.
- Lowers costs for consumers.
- Cleans up air pollution and protects public health.

19 states provide financial incentives for EVs and/or charging equipment.

- Colorado Rev. Stat. §39-22-516.8 allows a tax credit up to $20,000 for the purchase of an electric or fuel cell heavy-duty truck. The credit declines over time and expires after 2021.
- Maryland HB1246 (2019) provides up to $3,000 in tax credits for purchase of a plug-in electric or hybrid vehicle.

Expand private and public electric vehicle charging infrastructure

Charging stations are an integral part of transportation electrification. In order to minimize range anxiety and encourage EV purchases, states can increase investment in EV charging infrastructure.

- Promotes widespread charging infrastructure growth.
- Incentivizes EV purchases by reducing range anxiety and increasing convenience.

See examples.

- New Jersey S2252 (2020) requires 1,400 new chargers be installed by the end of 2025, to create a statewide charging network.
- Vermont H942 (2020) prioritizes investment in electric buses, EV charging infrastructure, and pedestrian and bicycle facilities for federal stimulus dollars. It also details incentive levels and income thresholds for the state's new Plug-in EV Incentive program.

Expand and electrify Public Transportation

Electric and widely-used buses, subways, trains, and light rails are critical features of transportation decarbonization. States can expand this by using existing federal funding mechanisms, such as the (1) Federal Highway and Transit Administration's Low- or No-emissions program and (2) Volkswagen Funds.

- Support local businesses and workers.
- Reduce traffic: In 2003, the 85 largest US cities dealt with congestion that caused 3.7 billion hours of travel delay and wasted 2.3 billion gallons of fuel.
- Reduce government spending on maintenance and fuel: Each electric bus is estimated to save governments $400,000 in fuel and $125,000 in maintenance over the lifetime over diesel.
- Reduce air pollution and improve public health: Smog and diesel emissions from buses drive up asthma rates across the US, with children and low-income communities bearing the greatest burden.

See examples.

- Virginia's Six-Year Improvement Program adopted in 2017 allocates almost $800 million to passenger rail programs.
- Maryland HB1255 (2019) and Nevada SB299 (2019) support school districts transitioning to electric buses.
- Vermont H529 (2019) contains $93 million for public transit, bike-ped, and rail, among many other fiscally responsible, budget-neutral transportation and infrastructure investments.

Invest in Smart Growth and Complete Streets

Smart growth is the efficient placement of land use activities, infrastructure, and growth across the entire state to minimize vehicle miles travelled. Policies include zoning changes, regional planning, and transit-oriented development. States can work with the EPA’s Smart Growth Implementation Assistance Plan program to develop regional plans.

Complete Streets programs encourage walking and biking through more sidewalks, safer bike lanes, favorable zoning, well-designed urban trails, and mixed-use development. States can use federal BUILD grants to fund biking and pedestrian infrastructure upgrades.

- Support local businesses and workers.
- Reduce traffic: In 2003, the 85 largest US cities dealt with congestion that caused 3.7 billion hours of travel delay and wasted 2.3 billion gallons of fuel.
- Reduce government spending on maintenance and fuel: Each electric bus is estimated to save governments $400,000 in fuel and $125,000 in maintenance over the lifetime over diesel.
- Reduce air pollution and improve public health: Smog and diesel emissions from buses drive up asthma rates across the US, with children and low-income communities bearing the greatest burden.

See examples.

- Illinois SB1939 (2019) dedicates funding for walking and biking projects in the six-year transportation capital program. The bill includes $50 million annually for walking and bicycling projects and sustainable funding for public transit.
- California SB375 (2008) requires metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs) to prepare strategies to meet emissions targets and requires each MPO to develop a sustainable community strategy, which must include transportation.
- New York Smart Growth Public Infrastructure Policy Act (2010) ensures that public infrastructure projects meet ten key smart growth goals and maximize public and environmental health benefits.

Expand and electrify rail – for passengers and freight

Railway freight is the second most popular way to move goods, after road transport, and high-speed rails for passengers have soared in popularity. Expanding and electrifying rail will dramatically reduce freight-related emissions. States have an increasingly large role in rail planning and development.

- Creates jobs and drives economic development by moving goods and increasing worker mobility
- Reduces truck traffic, thereby reducing congestion and air pollution.
- Reduces wear and tear on roads.

See example.

In 2019, Virginia Governor Northam announced a landmark agreement enabling Virginia to construct a $1.9 billion rail bridge linking VA to Washington DC, double support for Amtrak, and expand public transit and freight rail. The General Assembly passed an omnibus measure (HB1414, 2020) to raise additional funds. The General Assembly started the groundwork for expanding rail under Republican leadership years earlier.

Legislative Action

What are the benefits?

New Jersey
S2252 (2020)
Goals and incentives for increased use of Electric Vehicles (EVs)

1. Green Fleets: Requires state-owned light-duty vehicles to be electric by 2035; Requires New Jersey Transit to purchase only zero-emission buses after 2032.
2. Financial Incentives: Provides rebates up to $5,000 per EV, funded by $300 million per year over 10 years from the state’s Clean Energy Fund; Grants the Board of Public Utilities the authority to establish an incentive program for the purchase and installation of in-home EV charging equipment up to $500 per household.
3. Charging Infrastructure: Requires 1,400 new chargers in the state by the end of 2025, 400 of which must be DC fast chargers; Requires at least 15% of all multi-family residences be equipped with charging equipment by 2025.
4. Electric Vehicle Target: Sets a target of 2 million light-duty EVs in the state by 2035.

Washington
HB2042 (2019) & HB1512 (2019)
Transportation Decarbonization Package

1. Utility Transportation Electrification Plans: Authorizes municipal utilities and public utility districts to file transportation electrification plans, removing any doubt about their authority to build EV charging infrastructure, encourage EV adoption by their customers, and facilitate electrification of transportation; Expands the Utilities & Transportation Commission’s authority to review and approve EV infrastructure and incentive plans for investor-owned utilities.
2. Green Fleets: Authorizes a new green transportation capital grant program that will support the conversion of public fleets to electric, hydrogen, or fuel cells.
3. Financial Incentives: Extends the EV and alternative-fuel vehicle retail sales and use tax exemption through 2025 and expands it to include charging equipment for electric and alternative-fuel buses; Increases and extends the alternative-fuel vehicle tax credit for businesses to up to 50% of the cost of purchase.
4. Justice: Authorizes a new pilot program, which will provide grants to non-profit agencies, local governments, and housing authorities to provide low- and moderate-income workers, particularly those without access to public transit, with access to EV and alternative-fuel vehicles through car-sharing or similar programs.

Agriculture & Conservation (10%)

Forests, oceans, and soil store a significant amount of carbon. Creative state policies can help preserve these natural and agricultural systems, while also supporting farmers, reducing waste, and protecting beautiful places for all of us to enjoy.

Legislative Action

What is it?

Legislative Actions
(in detail)

What are the benefits?

Examples

Fight food waste through policies such as organic waste reduction goals and donation standards

Food waste is responsible for roughly 8% of global emissions. Almost one-third of all food in the US is wasted. When food breaks down in landfalls, it releases methane, a powerful greenhouse gas.

- Enact organic waste bans, which prohibit entities that generate large quantities of food waste from sending it to landfills – instead prioritizing waste reduction, donation, or composing.
- Increase liability protections for food donors and food recovery organizations.
- Offer tax incentives for food donation.
- Simplify food date labeling to avoid incentivizing early disposal.
- Establish a statewide organic waste reduction goal.
- Direct cities to devise a plan for collecting and composting organic waste.

- Reduce waste and emissions.
- Reduce food insecurity: 41 million Americans face food insecurity.
- Promote economic activity and create jobs in food hauling.

- New York S2995 (2019-2020) requires large generators of food scraps to donate excess food and compost remaining food scraps if they are within 2 miles of an organic recycler.
- Vermont Act 148 (2012) bans disposal of food waste and yard debris in landfills. It was updated in 2019.
- California SB54 (2019-2020) requires the Department of Food and Agriculture to clarify food labeling.
- California SB1383 (2015-2016) mandates universal composting, directing CalRecycle to reduce organic waste disposal by 75% and recover 20% of edible food that is thrown away by 2025. AB1826 (2013-2014) and AB876 (2015-2016) addressed reporting and infrastructure planning.

Forests are significant carbon sinks, offsetting approximately 11% of all US greenhouse gas emissions. From 2011 to 2017, the US has lost 24 million acres of natural areas.

- Enact land use regulation and conservation easements that protect existing forests and encourage reforestation.
- Expand existing public lands and connectivity.
- Encourage large-scale native tree planting.
- Provide financial incentives to landowners that donate, conserve, and restore their land.

- Sequester carbon from the atmosphere.
- Increase biodiversity and resilience.
- Provide tourism and recreational opportunities.

- The Maryland Forest Conservation Act (1991) requires counties in the state with less than 200,000 acres of forest to set aside forest acreage for preservation. HB272 (2019) and SB729 (2019) closed loopholes in the law.
- Pennsylvania's State Forest Resource Management Plan (2016) recognizes carbon sequestration as an objective of managing its state forest system.
- Kentucky's forest stewardship incentives fund provides financial assistance to landowners for restoration efforts.
- North Carolina Forest Development Act provides funding for reforestation and forest improvement work.
- Virginia allows an income tax credit for 40% of the value of donated land or conservation easements.

Support farmers practicing regenerative agriculture

Soil stores a significant amount of carbon, but industrial agricultural methods deplete carbon stocks. Regenerative agriculture can improve soil management and increase carbon storage through techniques like no-till agriculture and crop rotation.

- Develop and fund grants, technical support, and risk mitigation programs for farmers using regenerative practices.
- Fund research & demonstration projects, and bring together stakeholders including farmers, public institutions, nonprofits, and businesses.

- Support farmers and local economies.
- Improve farm resilience to flooding, drought, and erosion.
- Reduce chemical reliance and fossil fuel inputs.
- Increase biodiversity and ecosystem health.
- Sequester carbon in the soil.

- Iowa and Nebraska provide financial incentives to farmers who adopt cover crop practices.
- Washington SB5947 (2019) establishes the “Sustainable Farms and Fields” grant program to support farmers who use practices that reduce fossil fuel inputs and increase carbon storage.
- Washington's Soil Health Initiative provides funding for research on soil health and management best practices.
- New Mexico’s Healthy Soil Act (HB204 2019) offers grants to farmers who plant cover crops or native grasses, switch to no-till practices, or otherwise help increase the soil’s organic matter and carbon content.
- Maryland HB1063 (2017) establishes the Healthy Soils Program to provide funding and incentives.

Adaptation & Resilience

Climate change is already causing more severe storms, droughts, wildfires, and other natural disasters across the U.S. Planning our infrastructure to be more resilient to these disasters will increase long-term safety, security, and economic wellbeing. It is crucial that disaster preparedness and recovery programs prioritize equity and protect vulnerable communities.

Legislative Action

What is it?

What are the benefits?

Who else has done it?

Examples

Incorporate climate science in infrastructure planning

Climate change is fueling more severe storms, floods, fires, and other disasters. State and local governments must plan effectively for these disasters by incorporating hazard mitigation and resilience measures in new and existing infrastructure projects.

- Ensures infrastructure is disaster-ready.
- Reduces disaster recovery costs: $1 invested into resilience saves $6 of recovery costs.
- Protects lives, improves safety, and helps ensure resource-security.
- Reduces inefficiencies in existing infrastructure.
- Protects vulnerable and low-income communities: without climate-resilient infrastructure, these communities will be hit hardest by disasters.

- In 2019, 31 states enacted 92 disaster mitigation policies.

- California AB2800 (2016) requires state agencies to consider current and future effects of climate change when planning, building, and investing in state infrastructure.
- New York A06558 (2014) requires the state to adopt official projections of future sea level rise and mandates that sea level rise and other climate considerations be considered in several state programs.
- New Jersey S2873 (2017) requires that municipal land use plans address smart growth, storm resiliency, and sustainability.
- The Colorado Resilience Framework was introduced by the governor after devastating floods in 2013 to prioritize resilience in planning.

Improve indoor air quality (IAQ)

Pollutant concentration can be two to five times higher indoors than outdoors. Gas stoves contribute heavily to indoor pollution, and replacing them with electric stoves not only improves indoor air quality but also reduces greenhouse gas emissions.

- Protects public health: poor IAQ can cause long-term health impacts.
- Dovetails with emissions mitigation measures, including energy efficiency and phaseouts of natural gas hookups.
- Creates clean energy jobs in the building electrification sector.

Most states and DC have piecemeal requirements, but almost none have comprehensive legislation.

- San Francisco Ordinance No. 237-20 (2020) bans natural gas in new buildings, reducing GHG emissions while improving indoor air quality.
- The Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) offers a rebate to customers installing induction stoves.
- California AB841 (2020) enables the provision of grants to education agencies in order to reopen schools with approved and tested heating, ventilation, and air condition (HVAC) systems.

Promote energy security through microgrids and distributed energy generation

Microgrids and distributed clean energy can provide more reliable power during outage events. Legislative action is necessary to catalyze development of microgrids.

- Improves energy independence and reliability in the face of disasters, especially when microgrids are built for critical facilities like hospitals, fire stations, and water filtration plans.

- Reduces emissions through increased on-site generation and efficiency.

- Can generate revenue by providing grid services.

- In 2017, 16 states passed more than 35 grid resilience bills.
- Microgrids require clearer legal frameworks and financial leverage in order to become more widespread.

- California SB1339 (2018) requires the Public Utilities Commission to develop regulations supporting the commercialization of microgrids.
- Washington SB5965 (2017 budget) provides grants to enhance reliability and resiliency of the electric grid, including for research and development for smart grid technologies and grid modernization.
- Connecticut HB7208 (2017) includes microgrids in the Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy (C-PACE) financing program.

Require comprehensive tracking of natural disaster spending

Funds for disaster preparedness, response, and recovery have historically lacked transparency and varied widely by state. With comprehensive tracking, all levels of government can collaborate to ensure efficient and equitable disaster preparation and response.

- Reduces inefficiencies between federal and state assistance programs.
- Streamlines disaster readiness by enabling collaboration between all levels of government.
- Increases transparency of disaster-related costs.

The vast majority of states do not comprehensively track disaster spending, and spending varies widely by state.

- Ohio created State Recovery Partners, a group of 29 state agencies participating in FEMA long-term recovery activities, to facilitate interdepartmental communication on disaster spending.
- Arizona’s Emergency Council reviews disasters costing more than $200,000 and assesses quarterly reports for disasters still in response and recovery.

Identify vulnerabilities and ensure equity in long-term planning

Governments can identify vulnerable communities, and ensure that adaptation plans specifically work to address communities’ vulnerabilities and leverage their strengths.

- Recognizes that climate change compounds existing inequalities and vulnerabilities and works to interrupt this cycle.
- Saves lives and ensures protection for high-risk communities.
- Equips advocates and decisionmakers with information.

See examples.

- Several states, including CA, WA, and MD have environmental justice mapping tools that assess pollution and socioeconomic factors to inform action. WA is using this data to direct low-income energy assistance and upgrades through utility programs (SB5116 2019).
- New York’s 100% clean energy law (SB6599 2019) includes an equity screen and requires 35% of climate investments go to disadvantaged communities.
- Local governments are experimenting with approaches to address community needs alongside adaptation, from housing to water to economic resilience.

Provide resilience education to local governments

Local governments often experience revenue disruption as a result of climate-related disasters (flooding, drought, pollution, tropical storms, etc.). Providing webinars and workshops to local governments can help them prepare for such disruptions.

- Proactively prepares communities and enhances coordination.
- Allows for continuity in critical services in the case of disaster.
- Reduces recovery costs: every $1 invested in disaster mitigation saves an average of $6 in future recovery costs.

Many cities and local governments have resiliency plans but lack resources to make them comprehensive.

- Maryland Executive Order 01.01.2007.07 established the Commission on Climate Change. Its Adaptation and Response Working Group (ARWG) provides local governments with resources to adapt to climate change.
- The California Adaptation Planning Guide provides guidance to local governments in implementing adaptation and resilience efforts.

Fund green infrastructure projects

Green infrastructure (ranging from native plantings to green roofs, rain gardens and permeable pavers) is a cost-effective, sustainable approach to managing stormwater.

- Reduces flooding, erosion, and water contamination.
- Adds natural beauty and habitat to urban spaces.
- Cheaper and more resilient than built infrastructure.

Hundreds of local governments across the nation have leveraged federal and state funding, including through EPA and HUD.

- The Massachusetts Green Bonds program funds water management projects including green stormwater.
- New Jersey’s newly amended Stormwater Management Rules (2020) require the use of green infrastructure.
- California's Urban Greening Program (SB859 2016) provides competitive grants to fund local green infrastructure projects.

Invest in conservation

Legislatures can fund projects to restore and protect ecosystems, biodiversity, and wildlife. Doing so makes ecosystems and ecosystem services more resilient to climate change and helps sequester carbon.

- Defends critical “ecosystem services," such as flood control, water purification, pollination, and more.
- Protects ecosystems and species.

- All 50 states have a Wildlife Action Plan, but effectiveness varies.
- The US Fish & Wildlife Service lists specific conservation plans by topic and region.

- California AB109 (2017) allocates $20 million to the Wildlife Conservation Board for land resiliency.
- The Forever Florida Act (2001) protects and restores floodplains and other ecosystems.
- Maryland's Forest Conservation Act (1991) minimizes habitat loss by requiring Forest Conservation Plans alongside other permits on land >1 acre.
- Kentucky's forest stewardship incentives fund provides financial assistance to landowners for restoration efforts.

Ensure equitable disaster preparation and response

Disaster mitigation and recovery projects have disproportionately benefitted wealthier, whiter communities. All disaster response and mitigation programs – from infrastructure upgrades to relocation programs, recovery funds, state insurance programs, and beyond – must specifically engage and prioritize vulnerable communities.

- Saves lives by actively prioritizing protection for vulnerable communities.
- Recognizes that climate change compounds existing inequalities and vulnerabilities and works to interrupt this cycle.

See examples.

- Maryland’s Resiliency Hub Grant Program funds the construction of Resiliency Hubs in low-income, high-density communities.

- California SB160 (2019) requires counties to integrate cultural competence in their emergency plans and hold community engagement forums in geographically diverse locations.

- New York and New Jersey launched resiliency programs in response to displacement following Hurricane Sandy.

- Philadelphia's Community Heat Relief Plan outlines a community- oriented process to combatting extreme heat and its disproportionate effects on disadvantaged communities.

- Miami’s Inclusionary Zoning Ordinance (2018) requires developers to provide affordable housing in an inland neighborhood, safe from sea level rise.

- South Carolina’s Disaster Relief and Resilience Act (2020) creates a Fund to provide disaster mitigation and relief assistance to vulnerable communities.

Reduce Reliance on Fossil Fuels

The clean energy transition is underway, but we cannot achieve climate goals without also working to reduce reliance on fossil fuels. Smart policies to reduce fossil fuel reliance have huge health benefits for fenceline communities, save money, avoid stranded costs, and ensure communities are prepared for the inevitable clean energy transition. State can help chart a path towards a clean energy future, while prioritizing jobs and justice.

Legislative Action

What is it?

What are the benefits?

Who else has done it?

Examples

Support impacted fossil fuel workers

The clean energy transition is inevitable and is already underway. States can enact policies to support impacted fossil fuel workers in the process. These policies include dedicated funding to workers and communities transitioning off fossil fuels, job-transition programs, secured retirement benefits, direct investments from loss of local tax base, prioritization of clean energy projects in transitioning communities, and more.

Ensures economic benefits and high-quality opportunities for impacted fossil fuel workers and communities.

See examples.

- Colorado HB19-1314 (2019) creates the state Office of Just Transition, with the support from Colorado AFL-CIO and environmental groups, to deliver targeted programming and funding to communities affected by a transition from coal. In addition, a utility that proposes accelerated retirement of a coal plant must submit a workforce transition plan at least six months before the facility retirement.
- Minnesota HF1842 (2020) establishes the Community Energy Transition Grants Program, a transition grant program for impacted fossil fuel communities "to address the economic dislocation associated with the closing of a local electric generating plant."

Hold government accountable to climate action

Legislative action to increase government accountability on climate can include specifying the responsibilities of an elected official or body and allowing for legal action against such bodies when they fail to execute their duties.

- Ensures that climate goals are met.
- Empowers the voices of constituents.
- Increases transparency in government action.

See examples.

- Vermont H688 (2020), in addition to codifying emissions reductions targets and elected officials’ responsibilities, allows citizens to sue the Secretary of Natural Resources should they not develop a plan that meets those targets.
- Honolulu Bill 65 (2020) clearly outlines the responsibilities of the City Office on Climate Change, Sustainability, and Resiliency.

Undo state fossil fuel subsidies

Fossil fuel subsidies artificially lower the cost of fossil fuel production, raise the price perceived by producers, or lower the price paid by consumers. These subsidies are hidden in tax breaks, capital depreciation allowances, loans at favorable rates, price controls, and purchase requirements.

- Frees up hundreds of billions of dollars nationally to put towards priorities like education, healthcare, and clean energy.
- Reduces emissions.
- Aligns energy companies’ interests with climate goals.

There are thousands of subsidies at the state and local level, but they are largely untracked and have little public visibility.

New York S2649C (2019-2020) would examine the effects of the state's fossil fuel-related tax expenditures and put a five-year sunset on them. The bill has passed the Senate.

Establish carbon pricing

Carbon pricing holds polluters accountable by placing a price (carbon tax) or a cap (cap-and-trade) on carbon emissions. It can cover emissions from individual sectors or the entire economy.

- Raises revenues for governments, which can be spent on dividends, renewable energy projects, and low-income community investments.

- Stimulates clean technology and market innovation.

- Drives efficient emission reductions by allowing businesses to choose how they reduce emissions.

13 states participate in two regional pricing mechanisms. Only California’s is economy-wide.

- The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) is an electricity sector cap-and-trade system across ten Northeast states. It has reduced emissions while growing the region's economy, resulting in $2.9 billion in net economic benefits from 2009-2014.
- California’s cap-and-trade program covers nearly its entire economy and is linked with Quebec. Since it began, the program has generated $5 billion in total revenue.

Institute stringent minimum statewide drilling setbacks

Drilling setbacks set the minimum distance allowed between an active drilling operation and facilities like schools and homes. Their purpose is to protect public health by creating a buffer between sensitive populations and toxic pollutant releases.

- Protects public health: living near oil and gas wells can lead to to severe health impacts. 12.6 million people in the US live within 0.5 mile of an active oil or gas drilling sit.
- Address health disparities: Polluting facilities are disproportionately sited near communities of color.

Many states have drilling setbacks that are inadequate to protect public health.

- California AB345 (2019-2020) seeks to establish a minimum setback distance of 2,500 ft between oil and gas wells and sensitive sites including occupied dwellings, schools, healthcare facilities, and playgrounds. It passed the Assembly and is currently in the Senate.
- Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) is poised to impose a 2,000 ft drilling setback, the nation's biggest drilling setback. The proposed rule change comes amid a sweeping overhaul of COGCC regulations required by SB181 (2019).

Establish securitization for retiring facilities (most useful for regulated markets)

Securitization allows coal plants to economically retire by permitting utilities to refinance the debt on their coal and natural gas plants at a lower interest rate. The savings can be used to facilitate the transition to clean energy, compensate workers, and invest in impacted communities.

- Avoids rate increases and saves money for people and businesses.
- Can free up resources to support impacted fossil fuel workers and communities.
- Attracts private investment: Securitization has attracted over $50 billion from investors.

24 states, DC, and Puerto Rico have passed securitization-authorizing legislation.

- Colorado SB236 (2019) authorizes the securitization of coal plants and uses some of the millions of dollars in savings from securitization to reinvest back in workers and vulnerable communities impacted by the plant retirement.
- Montana HB467 (2019) authorizes the securitization of energy infrastructure, including coal plants.
- New Mexico’s 100% clean energy law (SB489 2019) includes securitization provisions to help recover costs of coal plant retirements and uses low-interest bonds to finance economic relief, such as severance pay and job training, for communities affected by coal plant closures.

Limit construction of new fossil fuel generation and close coal resources

Limits or bans on new fossil fuel generation– including fracking, offshore drilling, and coal-fired generation– provide certainty that states decarbonize their generation resources.

- Reduces economy-wide emissions by tackling the upstream source of emissions.
- Spurs innovation across sectors.
- Protects vulnerable communities, who, due to historically discriminatory zoning laws, more likely live near fossil fuel generation and face adverse health effects.

- 4 states have banned fracking. 4 states have banned coal.
- 10 states have passed legislation or an amendment to restrict offshore drilling.

- Fracking bans: Vermont (H464 2011-2012), Maryland (HB1325 2017), New York (as part of FY2021 budget), and Washington (SB5145 2019)
- Coal bans: Oregon (SB1547 2020), New York (by regulation), Washington (SB5116 2020), and Hawaii (SB2629 2020)
- Offshore drilling restrictions: Virginia HB706 (2020) prohibits the granting of a lease, easement, or permit for infrastructure in Virginia's coastal waters that would convey oil or gas.

Adopt economy-wide greenhouse gas reduction targets

A greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction target is an economy-wide goal to reduce emissions by a specific amount by a specific date (ex. 50% below 1990 levels by 2030). The targets can cover all GHG emissions or specific gases (eg. CO2 only).

- Reduces greenhouse gas emissions economy-wide.
- Spurs innovation across sectors.

18 states, DC, and Puerto Rico have implemented GHG emission targets through legislation or executive action.

- Maine was the first state to set specific GHG reduction targets through LD845 (2003). LD1679 (2019) replaced those targets with enforceable long-term targets of 45% by 2030 and 80% by 2050 (below 1990 levels).
- Colorado HB1261 (2019) adopts GHG reduction targets of 26% by 2025, 50% by 2030, and 90% by 2050 (below 2005 levels).
- Nevada SB254 (2019) adopts GHG reduction targets of 28% by 2025, 45% by 2030 (below 2005 levels) and net-zero by 2050.

Equity & Justice

Low-income communities and communities of color are disproportionately burdened with cumulative environmental and social impacts. Equitable climate change prevention and adaptation policy must address existing injustice, prevent future disproportionate burdens, and actively include frontline communities in decision-making processes.

Legislative Action

Legislative Actions
(in detail)

What are the benefits?

Examples

Identify vulnerabilities and ensure equity in long-term planning

- Require local and state governments to consider environmental justice and equity in adaptation and resilience planning, ie. in resilient affordable housing, flood prevention, disaster prep, and more.
- Collect data to assess environmental injustice and pre-existing vulnerabilities.

- Creates adaptation and resilience plans that most effectively protect all communities, but particularly those that are disadvantaged.
- Residents and legislators can be better informed of disparities in environmental justice risk.

- Several states, including CA, WA, and MD have environmental justice mapping tools that assess pollution and socioeconomic factors to inform action. WA is using this data to direct low-income energy assistance and upgrades through utility programs (SB5116 2019).
- New York’s 100% clean energy law (SB6599 2019) includes an equity screen and requires 35% of climate investments go to disadvantaged communities.
- Local governments are experimenting with approaches to address community needs alongside adaptation, from housing to water to economic resilience.

Ensure equitable disaster preparation and response

- Ensure that disaster preparation and response policies are targeted toward the most vulnerable communities.
- Utilize metrics such as a Social Vulnerability Index (SVI) to determine which communities require the most assistance.

- Protect the most vulnerable communities and boost resilience to future disasters.
- Prevent bias: disaster mitigation and recovery projects have historically disproportionately protected and benefitted wealthier and whiter communities.

- Maryland’s Resiliency Hub Grant Program funds the construction of Resiliency Hubs in low-income, high-density communities.

- California SB160 (2019) requires counties to integrate cultural competence in their emergency plans and hold community engagement forums in geographically diverse locations.
- South Carolina’s Disaster Relief and Resilience Act (2020) creates a Fund to provide disaster mitigation and relief assistance to vulnerable communities.

Provide relief for communities in economic transition

Dedicate funding to workers and communities transitioning off fossil fuels, job-transition programs, secured retirement benefits, investments into local tax bases, and incentives to clean energy companies with strong labor standards.

- Ensure communities in economic transition are fairly compensated for their role in our country’s development.
- Ensure fossil fuel communities also benefit from the clean energy transition – through cleaner air, targeted investment, high labor standards, and new industries and jobs.

- Washington’s 100% clean energy law (SB5116 2019-2020) provides a tiered system of tax exemption for clean energy projects that meet certain workforce requirements, including projects developed under community workforce or project labor agreements, with compensation of workers at prevailing wages determined by collective bargaining, with woman-, minority-, or veteran-owned businesses, or with apprenticeship utilization.
- Colorado HB19-1314 (2019) creates the state Office of Just Transition, with the support from Colorado AFL-CIO and environmental groups. In addition, a utility that proposes accelerated retirement of a coal plant must submit a workforce transition plan at least six months before the retirement.
- Minnesota HF1842 (2020) establishes the Community Energy Transition Grants Program, a transition grant program for impacted fossil fuel communities "to address the economic dislocation associated with the closing of a local electric generating plant."

Invest in frontline communities: prioritize access to clean energy, energy efficiency, and transportation

- Direct a carveout of all clean energy investment towards clean energy, efficiency, clean transportation, and adaptation projects in low-income communities.

- Invest in energy assistance programs, including low-income weatherization programs and direct bill reductions.

- Assess barriers to adoption and upgrades.

- Ensure low-income and frontline communities benefit from the clean energy transition – from cleaner air to building upgrades to more and better jobs.
- Advance equity for communities that have faced disproportionate environmental and social burdens.

- Virginia’s 100% clean energy law (HB1526 2020) directs half of the state’s Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) auction proceeds to EE upgrades for low-income Virginians and 45% to flood mitigation and coastal resilience with a set-aside for disadvantaged communities.

- The Illinois Future Energy Jobs Act (SB2814 2016) invests more than $750 million in programs for low-income communities. One program, Illinois Solar for All, helps low-income customers, nonprofits, and community centers access rooftop and community solar. Another program provides solar job training.
- California SB535 (2011-2012) requires 35% of the state's GHG Emission Fund (cap-and-trade revenue) to be directed to environmental disadvantaged and low-income communities.
- Washington’s 100% clean energy law (SB5116 2019-2020) requires all utilities in the state make funds available for energy assistance to low-income households, which includes not only bill reductions but weatherization, energy efficiency, and “direct customer ownership in distributed energy resources.”
- Washington HB2644 (2006) supports low-income home energy assistance by allowing electric or power producers or distributors to take a credit against the public utility tax for up to 50% of billing discounts provided to low-income households or for contributions to home energy assistance funds.
- California Low-Income Weatherization Program provides low-income homes with PV systems and energy efficiency upgrades at no cost.
- California AB1232 (2017-2018) creates and expands anti-displacement protections for state energy efficiency programs serving low-income customers.
- Several states, including CA, WA, and MD have environmental justice mapping tools to help direct action.

Create permanent Environmental Justice Advisory Bodies

- Bring in frontline leaders as technical experts in developing equitable energy practices.
- Ensure advisory bodies have strong, meaningful roles and responsibilities, beyond simply giving advice. The recommendations that come from these bodies should be enforceable.
- Compensate members of these advisory groups accordingly, in order to support the capacity needed to fully participate in these boards.

- Learn from local experts and community members with deep knowledge of community needs, dynamics, and solutions.
- Ensure impacted and historically disenfranchised communities have a seat at the table and can advocate for specific needs.

- New York S2385 (2019-2020) creates a permanent EJ Advisory board and Interagency Coordinating Council. The Advisory Board will create a model EJ policy that ensures all New Yorkers have a right to fair treatment and meaningful involvement in the development of regulations and policies that affect the quality of their environment. The Interagency Coordinating Council will provide guidance to each state agency implementing EJ policies.

- Maryland HB0183 (2018) establishes the Prince George's County Environmental Justice Commission and requires the commission study and make recommendations on EJ issues to the Price George's County House Delegation.

- Virginia HB1042 (2020) creates the Virginia Council on Environmental Justice to advise the general assembly on “how to better protect low-income communities of color from disproportionate impacts of...pollution.”

Engage communities in decision-making

- Ensure stakeholder engagement processes meaningfully engage historically disenfranchised communities.
- Allow for robust and accessible public intervention periods.

- Ensure communities can advocate for their own needs.
- Ensure communities have a voice and makes utilities and companies accountable to public interest.

- The Illinois Clean Jobs Coalition held over 100 community “Listen, Lead, Share” events around the state to solicit input for clean energy legislation.
- The New York Climate Leadership and Community Protection Act S6599 (2019) included important justice and equity provisions, largely due to years of work by New York Renews, a broad coalition including labor unions, environmental groups, faith organizations, community groups, environmental justice advocates, and more.

Identify at-risk communities and apply equity screens in policy design

- Direct relevant agencies to develop a screening assessment that identifies at-risk communities based on demographic and environmental risk factors (ie. race and ethnicity, income, air quality, proximity to landfills, refineries, and wells, etc.).
- Make these tools available to the public.

- Allows states to identify and prioritize environmental justice communities.
- Recognizes that climate change compounds existing inequalities and vulnerabilities.
- Empowers advocates.

- California was the first state to implement a statewide assessment of pollution, climate change, and environmental impacts through its CalEnviroScreen program.
- New York’s 100 clean energy law (SB6599 2019-2020) includes an equity screen to ensure state policies don’t burden EJ communities and mandates that at least 35% of state investments in climate solutions go to disadvantaged communities.
- Washington is implementing an Environmental Health Disparities Map, similar to CalEnviroScreen. State agencies are using those data to inform implementation of its 100% clean electricity standard (SB5116 2019-2020) that ensures utilities fund low-income energy assistance Ensure equitable & programs, such as direct bill reductions, weatherization, and energy efficiency improvements.

Institute stringent minimum statewide drilling setbacks

- Institute drilling setbacks of 2,000 feet (Colorado’s current proposal) or more from facilities like schools and homes, or launch a science-based process to determine appropriate distances to protect the health and safety of nearby residents.

- Protect vulnerable communities: Living near oil and gas wells is linked to headaches, upper respiratory illness, nausea, increase in cancer risk, premature births, smaller babies, and more. 12.6 million people in the US live within 0.5 mile of an active oil or gas drilling site.
- Address injustice: In some states, 1 in 5 Black residents live within a half-mile of an oil or gas production, processing or storage facility.

- California AB345 (2019-2020) seeks to establish a minimum setback distance of 2,500 ft between oil and gas wells and sensitive sites including occupied dwellings, schools, healthcare facilities, and playgrounds. It passed the Assembly and is currently in the Senate.
- Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) is poised to impose a 2,000 ft drilling setback. The proposed rule change comes amid a sweeping overhaul of COGCC regulations required by SB181 (2019).

Hold polluters accountable

- Undo policies that limit the ability of impacted parties to sue or collect damages from polluting companies.
- Require polluters, rather than taxpayers, to pay for pollution.

Transitioning to clean energy and holding polluters accountable is essential for mitigating disproportionate health impacts.

- Michigan HB4212 (2019) would require corporations to clean up and pay for the pollution which they have caused. The bill is currently in the House.
- New York SS3392 (2019) closes a loophole that excluded the oil and gas industry from hazardous waste treatment requirements for more than a decade.

Transition off of fossil fuels

- Enact a 100% RPS or CES with interim targets.

- Ensure GHG reductions also address co-pollutants, like NOx and PM, which are harmful to public health.

- Expand access to clean vehicles and public transportation.

- Shut down and clean up pollution from fossil fuel infrastructure located in or near communities.

Continued reliance on fossil fuels disproportionately impacts communities of color. Polluting facilities and heavy-duty truck transportation systems are disproportionately sited near communities of color and low-income communities, resulting in disproportionate exposure and health impacts.

- Fracking bans: Vermont (H464 2011-2012), Maryland (HB1325 2017), New York (as part of FY2021 budget), and Washington (SB5145 2019)
- Coal bans: Oregon (SB1547 2020), New York (by regulation), Washington (SB5116 2020), and Hawaii (SB2629 2020)
- New York’s 100% clean energy law (SB6599 2019-2020) requires proposed emissions reductions policies not increase co-pollutants. It also mandates offsets projects reduce co-pollutants, where possible.

Legislative Action

What are the benefits?

New York Climate Leadership and Community Protection Act
S6599 (2019)
Environmental Justice components

- Consulted community input in policy design and advocacy.
- Was shaped by a broad coalition, including labor unions, environmental and faith organizations, community groups, and environmental justice
advocates.
- Mandates that state agencies: 1) Develop and apply an ‘equity screen’ along with the bill’s ‘climate screen’, 2) Do not disproportionately burden disadvantaged communities in decision-making, 3) Prioritize reductions of greenhouse gas emissions and co-pollutants in disadvantaged communities
- Requires no less than 35% of all state investments in climate and clean energy go to disadvantaged communities.
- Establishes a Climate Action Council to create a scoping plan. The Council must convene and consult with a just-transition working group and
climate justice working group. Proposed actions by the Council address co-pollutants with major health impacts.

Create Clean Energy Jobs &
Support Economic Transition

Wind and solar are the fastest growing jobs in the nation, and clean energy industries employ nearly 3.4 million Americans across every county. Clean energy is an opportunity to put people back to work, invest in rural America, and become a leader in a growing industry. State policies can help unlock this growth, set high labor standards, and support workers and communities in economic transition.

Legislative Action

What is it?

What are the benefits?

Examples

Establish securitization for retiring facilities (most useful for regulated markets)

Securitization allows coal plants to economically retire by permitting utilities to refinance the debt on their coal and natural gas plants at a lower interest rate. The savings can be used to facilitate the transition to clean energy, compensate workers, and invest in impacted communities.

- Allows uneconomic facilities to retire early while supporting fossil fuel communities in economic transition.
- Frees up money that can be used to invest in communities and transition to clean energy.

- Colorado SB236 (2019) authorizes the securitization of coal plants and uses some of the millions of dollars in savings from securitization to reinvest back in workers and vulnerable communities impacted by the plant retirement.
- Montana HB467 (2019) authorizes the securitization of energy infrastructure, including coal plants.
- New Mexico’s 100% clean energy law (SB489 2019) includes securitization provisions to help recover costs of coal plant retirements and uses low-interest bonds to finance economic relief, such as severance pay and job training, for communities affected by coal plant closures.

Support impacted fossil fuel workers

The clean energy transition is inevitable and is already underway. States can enact just policies to support impacted fossil fuel workers in the process. These policies include dedicated funding to workers and communities transitioning off fossil fuels, job-transition programs, secured retirement benefits, and direct investments from loss of local tax base.

Ensures a just, economically-sound future for fossil fuel communities

- Colorado HB19-1314 (2019) creates the state Office of Just Transition, with the support from Colorado AFL-CIO and environmental groups, to deliver targeted programming and funding to communities affected by a transition from coal. In addition, a utility that proposes accelerated retirement of a coal plant must submit a workforce transition plan at least six months before the facility retirement. West Virginia is considering similar legislation.
- Minnesota HF1842 (2020) establishes the Community Energy Transition Grants Program, a transition grant program for impacted fossil fuel communities "to address the economic dislocation associated with the closing of a local electric generating plant."

Invest in clean energy to unlock a growing industry

Simply put, clean energy leads to widespread, high-quality job creation. Policies that set standards, align incentives, and stimulate investment can accelerate growth, put Americans back to work quickly, and rebuild a cleaner, more resilient and more equitable economy.

- Creates new jobs, fast: Wind and solar are the fastest-growing jobs in the nation. Federal stimulus can create almost a million clean energy jobs and generate $330 billion in economy activity (GDP) over the next five years. States will have a large role in allocating stimulus funding.
- Creates high-quality, high-paying jobs: In 2019, workers in clean energy earned a median hourly wage of $23.89 compared with the national median wage of $19.14. Jobs in many clean energy sectors are more likely to be unionized and come with health care and retirement benefits than other private sector jobs.
- Boosts rural economies: Solar and wind projects generate billions of dollars annually in rural tax revenue and direct landowner payments for farmers and ranchers. The clean energy industry employs more than 430,000 rural workers nationwide.
- Protects public health: Air pollution causes about 200,000 premature deaths every year. Clean energy and electric vehicles provide power free of air pollution.
- Addresses racial justice: Black Americans are 75% more likely to live near polluting industrial facilities, and to bear the health burdens of fossil fuels. Transitioning to clean energy and cleaning up toxic oil and gas sites is a necessary step towards addressing environmental health disparities.

Examples of job growth and community investment:
- The current utility-scale renewable fleet in Texas is expected to (1) generate up to $5.7 billion in new tax revenue to local communities (over 70% in rural communities) and (2) pay Texas landowners $5-7 billion in lease payments over the project lifetime.
- Rural renewable projects in eastern Colorado have generated $9.4 billion in construction and investment activity and resulted in 6,334 eastern Colorado jobs employed by 366 businesses.
- In North Carolina, solar facilities resulted in a nearly 2000% increase in property tax revenue for local communities.

Create and support job-training programs

States can invest in and encourage hiring from apprenticeship, pre-apprenticeship, and workforce development programs in clean energy, sustainable infrastructure, clean water, and more.

- Ensures a sufficient pipeline of skilled workers to adapt to and work on the rapidly-evolving clean energy technologies.

- Maryland’s 50% clean energy law (SB516 2019) provides funding for certain job training and apprenticeship programs. It also supports small businesses and women-, minority- and veteran-owned businesses.
- New Mexico’s 100% clean energy law (SB489 2019) requires 10% of workers on the construction of new electricity generation facilities be qualified apprentices in 2020, increasing to 17.5% in 2024-2026, and 25% thereafter.

Support clean energy projects that meet high-quality workforce requirements

States can provide financial incentives to clean energy companies that meet prevailing wage and high-quality job standards, use union labor, make community labor agreements, and are veteran- or minority-owned.

- Supports clean energy workers and ensures high labor standards.

- Washington's 100% clean energy law (SB5116 2019-2020) provides a tiered system of tax exemption for clean energy projects that meet certain workforce requirements.
- Maine HP924 (2019) requires employers constructing generation facilities to hire a certain percentage of apprentices, with the percentage increasing over time. The bill was strongly supported by labor unions, including an affiliate of the AFL-CIO.

Legislative Action

What are the benefits?

Washington’s 100% Clean Energy Law
SB5116 (2019)
Working with labor unions; Creating incentives for high-quality clean energy jobs

- Supported by building and construction unions and renewable energy developers, among other groups.
- Provides a tiered system of state tax exemptions for clean energy projects:

  1. 50% tax exemption for projects that make a a good-faith effort at “procurement from and contracts with women, minority, or veteran-owned businesses; procurement from and contracts with entities that have a history of complying with federal and state wage and hour laws and regulations; apprenticeship utilization; and preferred entry for workers living in the area where the project is being constructed.”
  2. 75% tax exemption for projects that meet the above criteria and also “compensate workers at prevailing wage rates determined by local collective bargaining.”
  3. 100% tax exemption for projects “developed under a community workforce agreement or project labor agreement,” as certified by the Department of Labor and industries.

Appendix: Legislative Action Statuses

Industry

Enact industrial emissions standards: Methane

Some Progress

- Colorado was "the first state to regulate methane emissions from oil and gas operations. In 2014, the AQCC approved regulatory updates that require infrared camera inspections or approved alternatives. The regulations reduce methane emissions from the oil and gas sector by an estimated 64,000 tons annually."
- SB181 (2019) updated the regulation of oil and gas development and operations in Colorado, giving more authority to local governments to protect public health, safety, and the environment. Section 3 directs the air quality control commission to review its rules to consider whether to adopt more stringent rules and to adopt rules to minimize emissions of methane.

Industry

Enact industrial emissions standards: Methane

Some Progress

- Colorado was "the first state to regulate methane emissions from oil and gas operations. In 2014, the AQCC approved regulatory updates that require infrared camera inspections or approved alternatives. The regulations reduce methane emissions from the oil and gas sector by an estimated 64,000 tons annually."
- SB181 (2019) updated the regulation of oil and gas development and operations in Colorado, giving more authority to local governments to protect public health, safety, and the environment. Section 3 directs the air quality control commission to review its rules to consider whether to adopt more stringent rules and to adopt rules to minimize emissions of methane.

Industry

Enact industrial emissions standards: Methane

Some Progress

- Colorado was "the first state to regulate methane emissions from oil and gas operations. In 2014, the AQCC approved regulatory updates that require infrared camera inspections or approved alternatives. The regulations reduce methane emissions from the oil and gas sector by an estimated 64,000 tons annually."
- SB181 (2019) updated the regulation of oil and gas development and operations in Colorado, giving more authority to local governments to protect public health, safety, and the environment. Section 3 directs the air quality control commission to review its rules to consider whether to adopt more stringent rules and to adopt rules to minimize emissions of methane.

Industry

Enact industrial emissions standards: Methane

Some Progress

- Colorado was "the first state to regulate methane emissions from oil and gas operations. In 2014, the AQCC approved regulatory updates that require infrared camera inspections or approved alternatives. The regulations reduce methane emissions from the oil and gas sector by an estimated 64,000 tons annually."
- SB181 (2019) updated the regulation of oil and gas development and operations in Colorado, giving more authority to local governments to protect public health, safety, and the environment. Section 3 directs the air quality control commission to review its rules to consider whether to adopt more stringent rules and to adopt rules to minimize emissions of methane.

Industry

Enact industrial emissions standards: Methane

Some Progress

- Colorado was "the first state to regulate methane emissions from oil and gas operations. In 2014, the AQCC approved regulatory updates that require infrared camera inspections or approved alternatives. The regulations reduce methane emissions from the oil and gas sector by an estimated 64,000 tons annually."
- SB181 (2019) updated the regulation of oil and gas development and operations in Colorado, giving more authority to local governments to protect public health, safety, and the environment. Section 3 directs the air quality control commission to review its rules to consider whether to adopt more stringent rules and to adopt rules to minimize emissions of methane.

Industry

Enact industrial emissions standards: Methane

Some Progress

- Colorado was "the first state to regulate methane emissions from oil and gas operations. In 2014, the AQCC approved regulatory updates that require infrared camera inspections or approved alternatives. The regulations reduce methane emissions from the oil and gas sector by an estimated 64,000 tons annually."
- SB181 (2019) updated the regulation of oil and gas development and operations in Colorado, giving more authority to local governments to protect public health, safety, and the environment. Section 3 directs the air quality control commission to review its rules to consider whether to adopt more stringent rules and to adopt rules to minimize emissions of methane.

Industry

Enact industrial emissions standards: Methane

Some Progress

- Colorado was "the first state to regulate methane emissions from oil and gas operations. In 2014, the AQCC approved regulatory updates that require infrared camera inspections or approved alternatives. The regulations reduce methane emissions from the oil and gas sector by an estimated 64,000 tons annually."
- SB181 (2019) updated the regulation of oil and gas development and operations in Colorado, giving more authority to local governments to protect public health, safety, and the environment. Section 3 directs the air quality control commission to review its rules to consider whether to adopt more stringent rules and to adopt rules to minimize emissions of methane.

Industry

Enact industrial emissions standards: Methane

Some Progress

- Colorado was "the first state to regulate methane emissions from oil and gas operations. In 2014, the AQCC approved regulatory updates that require infrared camera inspections or approved alternatives. The regulations reduce methane emissions from the oil and gas sector by an estimated 64,000 tons annually."
- SB181 (2019) updated the regulation of oil and gas development and operations in Colorado, giving more authority to local governments to protect public health, safety, and the environment. Section 3 directs the air quality control commission to review its rules to consider whether to adopt more stringent rules and to adopt rules to minimize emissions of methane.

Industry

Enact industrial emissions standards: Methane

Some Progress

- Colorado was "the first state to regulate methane emissions from oil and gas operations. In 2014, the AQCC approved regulatory updates that require infrared camera inspections or approved alternatives. The regulations reduce methane emissions from the oil and gas sector by an estimated 64,000 tons annually."
- SB181 (2019) updated the regulation of oil and gas development and operations in Colorado, giving more authority to local governments to protect public health, safety, and the environment. Section 3 directs the air quality control commission to review its rules to consider whether to adopt more stringent rules and to adopt rules to minimize emissions of methane.

Industry

Enact industrial emissions standards: HFCs

Little or No Progress

While other members of the U.S. Climate Alliance have taken action on HFC's as part of addressing short-lived pollutants, Colorado has yet to do so.

Industry

Enact industrial emissions standards: HFCs

Little or No Progress

While other members of the U.S. Climate Alliance have taken action on HFC's as part of addressing short-lived pollutants, Colorado has yet to do so.

Industry

Enact industrial emissions standards: HFCs

Little or No Progress

While other members of the U.S. Climate Alliance have taken action on HFC's as part of addressing short-lived pollutants, Colorado has yet to do so.

Industry

Enact industrial emissions standards: HFCs

Little or No Progress

While other members of the U.S. Climate Alliance have taken action on HFC's as part of addressing short-lived pollutants, Colorado has yet to do so.

Industry

Enact industrial emissions standards: HFCs

Little or No Progress

While other members of the U.S. Climate Alliance have taken action on HFC's as part of addressing short-lived pollutants, Colorado has yet to do so.

Industry

Enact industrial emissions standards: HFCs

Little or No Progress

While other members of the U.S. Climate Alliance have taken action on HFC's as part of addressing short-lived pollutants, Colorado has yet to do so.

Industry

Enact industrial emissions standards: HFCs

Little or No Progress

While other members of the U.S. Climate Alliance have taken action on HFC's as part of addressing short-lived pollutants, Colorado has yet to do so.

Industry

Enact industrial emissions standards: HFCs

Little or No Progress

While other members of the U.S. Climate Alliance have taken action on HFC's as part of addressing short-lived pollutants, Colorado has yet to do so.

Industry

Enact industrial emissions standards: HFCs

Little or No Progress

While other members of the U.S. Climate Alliance have taken action on HFC's as part of addressing short-lived pollutants, Colorado has yet to do so.

Industry

Establish a Buy-Clean Standard

Little or No Progress

According to Sierra Club, support for this initiative is brewing in Colorado but a bill has yet to be enacted. SB159 (2020) "Global Warming Potential For Public Project Materials" failed to pass.

Industry

Establish a Buy-Clean Standard

Little or No Progress

According to Sierra Club, support for this initiative is brewing in Colorado but a bill has yet to be enacted. SB159 (2020) "Global Warming Potential For Public Project Materials" failed to pass.

Industry

Establish a Buy-Clean Standard

Little or No Progress

According to Sierra Club, support for this initiative is brewing in Colorado but a bill has yet to be enacted. SB159 (2020) "Global Warming Potential For Public Project Materials" failed to pass.

Industry

Establish a Buy-Clean Standard

Little or No Progress

According to Sierra Club, support for this initiative is brewing in Colorado but a bill has yet to be enacted. SB159 (2020) "Global Warming Potential For Public Project Materials" failed to pass.

Industry

Establish a Buy-Clean Standard

Little or No Progress

According to Sierra Club, support for this initiative is brewing in Colorado but a bill has yet to be enacted. SB159 (2020) "Global Warming Potential For Public Project Materials" failed to pass.

Industry

Establish a Buy-Clean Standard

Little or No Progress

According to Sierra Club, support for this initiative is brewing in Colorado but a bill has yet to be enacted. SB159 (2020) "Global Warming Potential For Public Project Materials" failed to pass.

Industry

Establish a Buy-Clean Standard

Little or No Progress

According to Sierra Club, support for this initiative is brewing in Colorado but a bill has yet to be enacted. SB159 (2020) "Global Warming Potential For Public Project Materials" failed to pass.

Industry

Establish a Buy-Clean Standard

Little or No Progress

According to Sierra Club, support for this initiative is brewing in Colorado but a bill has yet to be enacted. SB159 (2020) "Global Warming Potential For Public Project Materials" failed to pass.

Industry

Establish a Buy-Clean Standard

Little or No Progress

According to Sierra Club, support for this initiative is brewing in Colorado but a bill has yet to be enacted. SB159 (2020) "Global Warming Potential For Public Project Materials" failed to pass.

Industry

Save money and reduce energy waste by enacting and expanding Energy Efficiency Resource Standards

Some Progress

- HB1037 (2007) amended Colorado statutes C.R.S. 40-1-102 and 40-3.2-101-105 by requiring the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (COPUC) to establish energy savings goals for investor-owned electric and gas utilities.
- HB1227 (2017) extends electric efficiency programs to 2028 and requires the commission to set goals of at least 5% peak demand reduction and 5% energy savings by 2028 for demand-side management programs implemented during 2019 through 2028 when compared to a 2018 baseline.

Industry

Save money and reduce energy waste by enacting and expanding Energy Efficiency Resource Standards

Some Progress

- HB1037 (2007) amended Colorado statutes C.R.S. 40-1-102 and 40-3.2-101-105 by requiring the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (COPUC) to establish energy savings goals for investor-owned electric and gas utilities.
- HB1227 (2017) extends electric efficiency programs to 2028 and requires the commission to set goals of at least 5% peak demand reduction and 5% energy savings by 2028 for demand-side management programs implemented during 2019 through 2028 when compared to a 2018 baseline.

Industry

Save money and reduce energy waste by enacting and expanding Energy Efficiency Resource Standards

Some Progress

- HB1037 (2007) amended Colorado statutes C.R.S. 40-1-102 and 40-3.2-101-105 by requiring the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (COPUC) to establish energy savings goals for investor-owned electric and gas utilities.
- HB1227 (2017) extends electric efficiency programs to 2028 and requires the commission to set goals of at least 5% peak demand reduction and 5% energy savings by 2028 for demand-side management programs implemented during 2019 through 2028 when compared to a 2018 baseline.

Industry

Save money and reduce energy waste by enacting and expanding Energy Efficiency Resource Standards

Some Progress

- HB1037 (2007) amended Colorado statutes C.R.S. 40-1-102 and 40-3.2-101-105 by requiring the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (COPUC) to establish energy savings goals for investor-owned electric and gas utilities.
- HB1227 (2017) extends electric efficiency programs to 2028 and requires the commission to set goals of at least 5% peak demand reduction and 5% energy savings by 2028 for demand-side management programs implemented during 2019 through 2028 when compared to a 2018 baseline.

Industry

Save money and reduce energy waste by enacting and expanding Energy Efficiency Resource Standards

Some Progress

- HB1037 (2007) amended Colorado statutes C.R.S. 40-1-102 and 40-3.2-101-105 by requiring the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (COPUC) to establish energy savings goals for investor-owned electric and gas utilities.
- HB1227 (2017) extends electric efficiency programs to 2028 and requires the commission to set goals of at least 5% peak demand reduction and 5% energy savings by 2028 for demand-side management programs implemented during 2019 through 2028 when compared to a 2018 baseline.

Industry

Save money and reduce energy waste by enacting and expanding Energy Efficiency Resource Standards

Some Progress

- HB1037 (2007) amended Colorado statutes C.R.S. 40-1-102 and 40-3.2-101-105 by requiring the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (COPUC) to establish energy savings goals for investor-owned electric and gas utilities.
- HB1227 (2017) extends electric efficiency programs to 2028 and requires the commission to set goals of at least 5% peak demand reduction and 5% energy savings by 2028 for demand-side management programs implemented during 2019 through 2028 when compared to a 2018 baseline.

Industry

Save money and reduce energy waste by enacting and expanding Energy Efficiency Resource Standards

Some Progress

- HB1037 (2007) amended Colorado statutes C.R.S. 40-1-102 and 40-3.2-101-105 by requiring the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (COPUC) to establish energy savings goals for investor-owned electric and gas utilities.
- HB1227 (2017) extends electric efficiency programs to 2028 and requires the commission to set goals of at least 5% peak demand reduction and 5% energy savings by 2028 for demand-side management programs implemented during 2019 through 2028 when compared to a 2018 baseline.

Industry

Save money and reduce energy waste by enacting and expanding Energy Efficiency Resource Standards

Some Progress

- HB1037 (2007) amended Colorado statutes C.R.S. 40-1-102 and 40-3.2-101-105 by requiring the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (COPUC) to establish energy savings goals for investor-owned electric and gas utilities.
- HB1227 (2017) extends electric efficiency programs to 2028 and requires the commission to set goals of at least 5% peak demand reduction and 5% energy savings by 2028 for demand-side management programs implemented during 2019 through 2028 when compared to a 2018 baseline.

Industry

Save money and reduce energy waste by enacting and expanding Energy Efficiency Resource Standards

Some Progress

- HB1037 (2007) amended Colorado statutes C.R.S. 40-1-102 and 40-3.2-101-105 by requiring the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (COPUC) to establish energy savings goals for investor-owned electric and gas utilities.
- HB1227 (2017) extends electric efficiency programs to 2028 and requires the commission to set goals of at least 5% peak demand reduction and 5% energy savings by 2028 for demand-side management programs implemented during 2019 through 2028 when compared to a 2018 baseline.

Industry

Provide financial incentives to encourage low-carbon alternatives

Little or No Progress

Colorado does not currently have legislation or executive-led programs to encourage low-carbon alternatives such as low-carbon concrete.

Industry

Provide financial incentives to encourage low-carbon alternatives

Little or No Progress

Colorado does not currently have legislation or executive-led programs to encourage low-carbon alternatives such as low-carbon concrete.

Industry

Provide financial incentives to encourage low-carbon alternatives

Little or No Progress

Colorado does not currently have legislation or executive-led programs to encourage low-carbon alternatives such as low-carbon concrete.

Industry

Provide financial incentives to encourage low-carbon alternatives

Little or No Progress

Colorado does not currently have legislation or executive-led programs to encourage low-carbon alternatives such as low-carbon concrete.

Industry

Provide financial incentives to encourage low-carbon alternatives

Little or No Progress

Colorado does not currently have legislation or executive-led programs to encourage low-carbon alternatives such as low-carbon concrete.

Industry

Provide financial incentives to encourage low-carbon alternatives

Little or No Progress

Colorado does not currently have legislation or executive-led programs to encourage low-carbon alternatives such as low-carbon concrete.

Industry

Provide financial incentives to encourage low-carbon alternatives

Little or No Progress

Colorado does not currently have legislation or executive-led programs to encourage low-carbon alternatives such as low-carbon concrete.

Industry

Provide financial incentives to encourage low-carbon alternatives

Little or No Progress

Colorado does not currently have legislation or executive-led programs to encourage low-carbon alternatives such as low-carbon concrete.

Industry

Provide financial incentives to encourage low-carbon alternatives

Little or No Progress

Colorado does not currently have legislation or executive-led programs to encourage low-carbon alternatives such as low-carbon concrete.

Industry

Create jobs, stimulate private investment, and help homeowners and business save money on electricity bills

Some Progress

- Colorado has an active statewide commercial PACE program (CO C-PACE). Colorado PACE financing offers property owners a new tool to finance energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy projects. PACE financing is available in counties and municipalities throughout the state.
- Colorado has a brownfields revolving loan fund available for the clean-up of environmentally contaminated commercial sites, but does not have an RLF for clean energy investment.
- Colorado Clean Energy Fund (CCEF) was launched in 2018 as a collaboration among the Colorado Energy Office (CEO), the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Coalition for Green Capital (CGC). Executive branch initiative in response to Colorado Climate Action Plan (HB1261).
- The Colorado Energy Office funds institutions and projects that conduct clean energy research including the Center for Renewable Energy Economic Development (CREED), "a catalyst for economic development in Colorado through clean energy and energy efficiency innovation and entrepreneurship." (Source)

Industry

Create jobs, stimulate private investment, and help homeowners and business save money on electricity bills

Some Progress

- Colorado has an active statewide commercial PACE program (CO C-PACE). Colorado PACE financing offers property owners a new tool to finance energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy projects. PACE financing is available in counties and municipalities throughout the state.
- Colorado has a brownfields revolving loan fund available for the clean-up of environmentally contaminated commercial sites, but does not have an RLF for clean energy investment.
- Colorado Clean Energy Fund (CCEF) was launched in 2018 as a collaboration among the Colorado Energy Office (CEO), the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Coalition for Green Capital (CGC). Executive branch initiative in response to Colorado Climate Action Plan (HB1261).
- The Colorado Energy Office funds institutions and projects that conduct clean energy research including the Center for Renewable Energy Economic Development (CREED), "a catalyst for economic development in Colorado through clean energy and energy efficiency innovation and entrepreneurship." (Source)

Industry

Create jobs, stimulate private investment, and help homeowners and business save money on electricity bills

Some Progress

- Colorado has an active statewide commercial PACE program (CO C-PACE). Colorado PACE financing offers property owners a new tool to finance energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy projects. PACE financing is available in counties and municipalities throughout the state.
- Colorado has a brownfields revolving loan fund available for the clean-up of environmentally contaminated commercial sites, but does not have an RLF for clean energy investment.
- Colorado Clean Energy Fund (CCEF) was launched in 2018 as a collaboration among the Colorado Energy Office (CEO), the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Coalition for Green Capital (CGC). Executive branch initiative in response to Colorado Climate Action Plan (HB1261).
- The Colorado Energy Office funds institutions and projects that conduct clean energy research including the Center for Renewable Energy Economic Development (CREED), "a catalyst for economic development in Colorado through clean energy and energy efficiency innovation and entrepreneurship." (Source)

Industry

Create jobs, stimulate private investment, and help homeowners and business save money on electricity bills

Some Progress

- Colorado has an active statewide commercial PACE program (CO C-PACE). Colorado PACE financing offers property owners a new tool to finance energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy projects. PACE financing is available in counties and municipalities throughout the state.
- Colorado has a brownfields revolving loan fund available for the clean-up of environmentally contaminated commercial sites, but does not have an RLF for clean energy investment.
- Colorado Clean Energy Fund (CCEF) was launched in 2018 as a collaboration among the Colorado Energy Office (CEO), the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Coalition for Green Capital (CGC). Executive branch initiative in response to Colorado Climate Action Plan (HB1261).
- The Colorado Energy Office funds institutions and projects that conduct clean energy research including the Center for Renewable Energy Economic Development (CREED), "a catalyst for economic development in Colorado through clean energy and energy efficiency innovation and entrepreneurship." (Source)

Industry

Create jobs, stimulate private investment, and help homeowners and business save money on electricity bills

Some Progress

- Colorado has an active statewide commercial PACE program (CO C-PACE). Colorado PACE financing offers property owners a new tool to finance energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy projects. PACE financing is available in counties and municipalities throughout the state.
- Colorado has a brownfields revolving loan fund available for the clean-up of environmentally contaminated commercial sites, but does not have an RLF for clean energy investment.
- Colorado Clean Energy Fund (CCEF) was launched in 2018 as a collaboration among the Colorado Energy Office (CEO), the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Coalition for Green Capital (CGC). Executive branch initiative in response to Colorado Climate Action Plan (HB1261).
- The Colorado Energy Office funds institutions and projects that conduct clean energy research including the Center for Renewable Energy Economic Development (CREED), "a catalyst for economic development in Colorado through clean energy and energy efficiency innovation and entrepreneurship." (Source)

Industry

Create jobs, stimulate private investment, and help homeowners and business save money on electricity bills

Some Progress

- Colorado has an active statewide commercial PACE program (CO C-PACE). Colorado PACE financing offers property owners a new tool to finance energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy projects. PACE financing is available in counties and municipalities throughout the state.
- Colorado has a brownfields revolving loan fund available for the clean-up of environmentally contaminated commercial sites, but does not have an RLF for clean energy investment.
- Colorado Clean Energy Fund (CCEF) was launched in 2018 as a collaboration among the Colorado Energy Office (CEO), the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Coalition for Green Capital (CGC). Executive branch initiative in response to Colorado Climate Action Plan (HB1261).
- The Colorado Energy Office funds institutions and projects that conduct clean energy research including the Center for Renewable Energy Economic Development (CREED), "a catalyst for economic development in Colorado through clean energy and energy efficiency innovation and entrepreneurship." (Source)

Industry

Create jobs, stimulate private investment, and help homeowners and business save money on electricity bills

Some Progress

- Colorado has an active statewide commercial PACE program (CO C-PACE). Colorado PACE financing offers property owners a new tool to finance energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy projects. PACE financing is available in counties and municipalities throughout the state.
- Colorado has a brownfields revolving loan fund available for the clean-up of environmentally contaminated commercial sites, but does not have an RLF for clean energy investment.
- Colorado Clean Energy Fund (CCEF) was launched in 2018 as a collaboration among the Colorado Energy Office (CEO), the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Coalition for Green Capital (CGC). Executive branch initiative in response to Colorado Climate Action Plan (HB1261).
- The Colorado Energy Office funds institutions and projects that conduct clean energy research including the Center for Renewable Energy Economic Development (CREED), "a catalyst for economic development in Colorado through clean energy and energy efficiency innovation and entrepreneurship." (Source)

Industry

Create jobs, stimulate private investment, and help homeowners and business save money on electricity bills

Some Progress

- Colorado has an active statewide commercial PACE program (CO C-PACE). Colorado PACE financing offers property owners a new tool to finance energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy projects. PACE financing is available in counties and municipalities throughout the state.
- Colorado has a brownfields revolving loan fund available for the clean-up of environmentally contaminated commercial sites, but does not have an RLF for clean energy investment.
- Colorado Clean Energy Fund (CCEF) was launched in 2018 as a collaboration among the Colorado Energy Office (CEO), the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Coalition for Green Capital (CGC). Executive branch initiative in response to Colorado Climate Action Plan (HB1261).
- The Colorado Energy Office funds institutions and projects that conduct clean energy research including the Center for Renewable Energy Economic Development (CREED), "a catalyst for economic development in Colorado through clean energy and energy efficiency innovation and entrepreneurship." (Source)

Industry

Create jobs, stimulate private investment, and help homeowners and business save money on electricity bills

Some Progress

- Colorado has an active statewide commercial PACE program (CO C-PACE). Colorado PACE financing offers property owners a new tool to finance energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy projects. PACE financing is available in counties and municipalities throughout the state.
- Colorado has a brownfields revolving loan fund available for the clean-up of environmentally contaminated commercial sites, but does not have an RLF for clean energy investment.
- Colorado Clean Energy Fund (CCEF) was launched in 2018 as a collaboration among the Colorado Energy Office (CEO), the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Coalition for Green Capital (CGC). Executive branch initiative in response to Colorado Climate Action Plan (HB1261).
- The Colorado Energy Office funds institutions and projects that conduct clean energy research including the Center for Renewable Energy Economic Development (CREED), "a catalyst for economic development in Colorado through clean energy and energy efficiency innovation and entrepreneurship." (Source)

Electricity

Increase renewable energy on the grid by enacting a renewable portfolio standard

Significant Progress

- SB236 (2019) directs Colorado utilities to generate more carbon-free electricity and consider the “social cost” of carbon when planning future energy projects, boosting the state's clean energy transition and ensuring the cost of climate change is considered in decisions. It includes provisions for utilities to file Clean Energy Plans for reducing emissions by 80% from 2005 levels by 2030 and energy generated from 100% clean energy sources by 2050.
- However, key stakeholders have found that Colorado doesn't appear to be on track to hitting many of these targets.

Electricity

Increase renewable energy on the grid by enacting a renewable portfolio standard

Significant Progress

- SB236 (2019) directs Colorado utilities to generate more carbon-free electricity and consider the “social cost” of carbon when planning future energy projects, boosting the state's clean energy transition and ensuring the cost of climate change is considered in decisions. It includes provisions for utilities to file Clean Energy Plans for reducing emissions by 80% from 2005 levels by 2030 and energy generated from 100% clean energy sources by 2050.
- However, key stakeholders have found that Colorado doesn't appear to be on track to hitting many of these targets.

Electricity

Increase renewable energy on the grid by enacting a renewable portfolio standard

Significant Progress

- SB236 (2019) directs Colorado utilities to generate more carbon-free electricity and consider the “social cost” of carbon when planning future energy projects, boosting the state's clean energy transition and ensuring the cost of climate change is considered in decisions. It includes provisions for utilities to file Clean Energy Plans for reducing emissions by 80% from 2005 levels by 2030 and energy generated from 100% clean energy sources by 2050.
- However, key stakeholders have found that Colorado doesn't appear to be on track to hitting many of these targets.

Electricity

Increase renewable energy on the grid by enacting a renewable portfolio standard

Significant Progress

- SB236 (2019) directs Colorado utilities to generate more carbon-free electricity and consider the “social cost” of carbon when planning future energy projects, boosting the state's clean energy transition and ensuring the cost of climate change is considered in decisions. It includes provisions for utilities to file Clean Energy Plans for reducing emissions by 80% from 2005 levels by 2030 and energy generated from 100% clean energy sources by 2050.
- However, key stakeholders have found that Colorado doesn't appear to be on track to hitting many of these targets.

Electricity

Increase renewable energy on the grid by enacting a renewable portfolio standard

Significant Progress

- SB236 (2019) directs Colorado utilities to generate more carbon-free electricity and consider the “social cost” of carbon when planning future energy projects, boosting the state's clean energy transition and ensuring the cost of climate change is considered in decisions. It includes provisions for utilities to file Clean Energy Plans for reducing emissions by 80% from 2005 levels by 2030 and energy generated from 100% clean energy sources by 2050.
- However, key stakeholders have found that Colorado doesn't appear to be on track to hitting many of these targets.

Electricity

Increase renewable energy on the grid by enacting a renewable portfolio standard

Significant Progress

- SB236 (2019) directs Colorado utilities to generate more carbon-free electricity and consider the “social cost” of carbon when planning future energy projects, boosting the state's clean energy transition and ensuring the cost of climate change is considered in decisions. It includes provisions for utilities to file Clean Energy Plans for reducing emissions by 80% from 2005 levels by 2030 and energy generated from 100% clean energy sources by 2050.
- However, key stakeholders have found that Colorado doesn't appear to be on track to hitting many of these targets.

Electricity

Increase renewable energy on the grid by enacting a renewable portfolio standard

Significant Progress

- SB236 (2019) directs Colorado utilities to generate more carbon-free electricity and consider the “social cost” of carbon when planning future energy projects, boosting the state's clean energy transition and ensuring the cost of climate change is considered in decisions. It includes provisions for utilities to file Clean Energy Plans for reducing emissions by 80% from 2005 levels by 2030 and energy generated from 100% clean energy sources by 2050.
- However, key stakeholders have found that Colorado doesn't appear to be on track to hitting many of these targets.

Electricity

Increase renewable energy on the grid by enacting a renewable portfolio standard

Significant Progress

- SB236 (2019) directs Colorado utilities to generate more carbon-free electricity and consider the “social cost” of carbon when planning future energy projects, boosting the state's clean energy transition and ensuring the cost of climate change is considered in decisions. It includes provisions for utilities to file Clean Energy Plans for reducing emissions by 80% from 2005 levels by 2030 and energy generated from 100% clean energy sources by 2050.
- However, key stakeholders have found that Colorado doesn't appear to be on track to hitting many of these targets.

Electricity

Increase renewable energy on the grid by enacting a renewable portfolio standard

Significant Progress

- SB236 (2019) directs Colorado utilities to generate more carbon-free electricity and consider the “social cost” of carbon when planning future energy projects, boosting the state's clean energy transition and ensuring the cost of climate change is considered in decisions. It includes provisions for utilities to file Clean Energy Plans for reducing emissions by 80% from 2005 levels by 2030 and energy generated from 100% clean energy sources by 2050.
- However, key stakeholders have found that Colorado doesn't appear to be on track to hitting many of these targets.

Electricity

Increase renewables and modernize the grid by upgrading transmission, distribution, and storage

Some Progress

- Transmission: SB236 (2019) added 40-2.3-102 to the Colorado Revised Statutes, requiring that there be a commission proceeding on or before January 1, 2020 followed by a public hearing on or before July 1, 2021 to evaluate participation in an energy imbalance market, regional transmission organization, power pool, or joint tariff.
- Distribution: SB236 (2019) added 40-2-135 to the Colorado Revised Statues, stipulating that "a retail electic utility customer is entitled to generate, consume, store, and export electricity produced from eligible energy resources to the electric grid through the use of customer-sited retail distributed generation."
- Storage: SB009 (2018) allows Coloradans to install and use energy storage on their property without unnecessary restrictions, boosting the state’s renewable market and jobs and promoting grid resiliency. HB1270 (2018) directs the PUC to "adopt rules, by February 1, 2019, establishing mechanisms for the procurement of energy storage systems by investor-owned electric utilities, based on an analysis of costs and benefits as well as factors such as grid reliability and a reduction in the need for additional peak generation capacity."

Electricity

Increase renewables and modernize the grid by upgrading transmission, distribution, and storage

Some Progress

- Transmission: SB236 (2019) added 40-2.3-102 to the Colorado Revised Statutes, requiring that there be a commission proceeding on or before January 1, 2020 followed by a public hearing on or before July 1, 2021 to evaluate participation in an energy imbalance market, regional transmission organization, power pool, or joint tariff.
- Distribution: SB236 (2019) added 40-2-135 to the Colorado Revised Statues, stipulating that "a retail electic utility customer is entitled to generate, consume, store, and export electricity produced from eligible energy resources to the electric grid through the use of customer-sited retail distributed generation."
- Storage: SB009 (2018) allows Coloradans to install and use energy storage on their property without unnecessary restrictions, boosting the state’s renewable market and jobs and promoting grid resiliency. HB1270 (2018) directs the PUC to "adopt rules, by February 1, 2019, establishing mechanisms for the procurement of energy storage systems by investor-owned electric utilities, based on an analysis of costs and benefits as well as factors such as grid reliability and a reduction in the need for additional peak generation capacity."

Electricity

Increase renewables and modernize the grid by upgrading transmission, distribution, and storage

Some Progress

- Transmission: SB236 (2019) added 40-2.3-102 to the Colorado Revised Statutes, requiring that there be a commission proceeding on or before January 1, 2020 followed by a public hearing on or before July 1, 2021 to evaluate participation in an energy imbalance market, regional transmission organization, power pool, or joint tariff.
- Distribution: SB236 (2019) added 40-2-135 to the Colorado Revised Statues, stipulating that "a retail electic utility customer is entitled to generate, consume, store, and export electricity produced from eligible energy resources to the electric grid through the use of customer-sited retail distributed generation."
- Storage: SB009 (2018) allows Coloradans to install and use energy storage on their property without unnecessary restrictions, boosting the state’s renewable market and jobs and promoting grid resiliency. HB1270 (2018) directs the PUC to "adopt rules, by February 1, 2019, establishing mechanisms for the procurement of energy storage systems by investor-owned electric utilities, based on an analysis of costs and benefits as well as factors such as grid reliability and a reduction in the need for additional peak generation capacity."

Electricity

Increase renewables and modernize the grid by upgrading transmission, distribution, and storage

Some Progress

- Transmission: SB236 (2019) added 40-2.3-102 to the Colorado Revised Statutes, requiring that there be a commission proceeding on or before January 1, 2020 followed by a public hearing on or before July 1, 2021 to evaluate participation in an energy imbalance market, regional transmission organization, power pool, or joint tariff.
- Distribution: SB236 (2019) added 40-2-135 to the Colorado Revised Statues, stipulating that "a retail electic utility customer is entitled to generate, consume, store, and export electricity produced from eligible energy resources to the electric grid through the use of customer-sited retail distributed generation."
- Storage: SB009 (2018) allows Coloradans to install and use energy storage on their property without unnecessary restrictions, boosting the state’s renewable market and jobs and promoting grid resiliency. HB1270 (2018) directs the PUC to "adopt rules, by February 1, 2019, establishing mechanisms for the procurement of energy storage systems by investor-owned electric utilities, based on an analysis of costs and benefits as well as factors such as grid reliability and a reduction in the need for additional peak generation capacity."

Electricity

Increase renewables and modernize the grid by upgrading transmission, distribution, and storage

Some Progress

- Transmission: SB236 (2019) added 40-2.3-102 to the Colorado Revised Statutes, requiring that there be a commission proceeding on or before January 1, 2020 followed by a public hearing on or before July 1, 2021 to evaluate participation in an energy imbalance market, regional transmission organization, power pool, or joint tariff.
- Distribution: SB236 (2019) added 40-2-135 to the Colorado Revised Statues, stipulating that "a retail electic utility customer is entitled to generate, consume, store, and export electricity produced from eligible energy resources to the electric grid through the use of customer-sited retail distributed generation."
- Storage: SB009 (2018) allows Coloradans to install and use energy storage on their property without unnecessary restrictions, boosting the state’s renewable market and jobs and promoting grid resiliency. HB1270 (2018) directs the PUC to "adopt rules, by February 1, 2019, establishing mechanisms for the procurement of energy storage systems by investor-owned electric utilities, based on an analysis of costs and benefits as well as factors such as grid reliability and a reduction in the need for additional peak generation capacity."

Electricity

Increase renewables and modernize the grid by upgrading transmission, distribution, and storage

Some Progress

- Transmission: SB236 (2019) added 40-2.3-102 to the Colorado Revised Statutes, requiring that there be a commission proceeding on or before January 1, 2020 followed by a public hearing on or before July 1, 2021 to evaluate participation in an energy imbalance market, regional transmission organization, power pool, or joint tariff.
- Distribution: SB236 (2019) added 40-2-135 to the Colorado Revised Statues, stipulating that "a retail electic utility customer is entitled to generate, consume, store, and export electricity produced from eligible energy resources to the electric grid through the use of customer-sited retail distributed generation."
- Storage: SB009 (2018) allows Coloradans to install and use energy storage on their property without unnecessary restrictions, boosting the state’s renewable market and jobs and promoting grid resiliency. HB1270 (2018) directs the PUC to "adopt rules, by February 1, 2019, establishing mechanisms for the procurement of energy storage systems by investor-owned electric utilities, based on an analysis of costs and benefits as well as factors such as grid reliability and a reduction in the need for additional peak generation capacity."

Electricity

Increase renewables and modernize the grid by upgrading transmission, distribution, and storage

Some Progress

- Transmission: SB236 (2019) added 40-2.3-102 to the Colorado Revised Statutes, requiring that there be a commission proceeding on or before January 1, 2020 followed by a public hearing on or before July 1, 2021 to evaluate participation in an energy imbalance market, regional transmission organization, power pool, or joint tariff.
- Distribution: SB236 (2019) added 40-2-135 to the Colorado Revised Statues, stipulating that "a retail electic utility customer is entitled to generate, consume, store, and export electricity produced from eligible energy resources to the electric grid through the use of customer-sited retail distributed generation."
- Storage: SB009 (2018) allows Coloradans to install and use energy storage on their property without unnecessary restrictions, boosting the state’s renewable market and jobs and promoting grid resiliency. HB1270 (2018) directs the PUC to "adopt rules, by February 1, 2019, establishing mechanisms for the procurement of energy storage systems by investor-owned electric utilities, based on an analysis of costs and benefits as well as factors such as grid reliability and a reduction in the need for additional peak generation capacity."

Electricity

Increase renewables and modernize the grid by upgrading transmission, distribution, and storage

Some Progress

- Transmission: SB236 (2019) added 40-2.3-102 to the Colorado Revised Statutes, requiring that there be a commission proceeding on or before January 1, 2020 followed by a public hearing on or before July 1, 2021 to evaluate participation in an energy imbalance market, regional transmission organization, power pool, or joint tariff.
- Distribution: SB236 (2019) added 40-2-135 to the Colorado Revised Statues, stipulating that "a retail electic utility customer is entitled to generate, consume, store, and export electricity produced from eligible energy resources to the electric grid through the use of customer-sited retail distributed generation."
- Storage: SB009 (2018) allows Coloradans to install and use energy storage on their property without unnecessary restrictions, boosting the state’s renewable market and jobs and promoting grid resiliency. HB1270 (2018) directs the PUC to "adopt rules, by February 1, 2019, establishing mechanisms for the procurement of energy storage systems by investor-owned electric utilities, based on an analysis of costs and benefits as well as factors such as grid reliability and a reduction in the need for additional peak generation capacity."

Electricity

Increase renewables and modernize the grid by upgrading transmission, distribution, and storage

Some Progress

- Transmission: SB236 (2019) added 40-2.3-102 to the Colorado Revised Statutes, requiring that there be a commission proceeding on or before January 1, 2020 followed by a public hearing on or before July 1, 2021 to evaluate participation in an energy imbalance market, regional transmission organization, power pool, or joint tariff.
- Distribution: SB236 (2019) added 40-2-135 to the Colorado Revised Statues, stipulating that "a retail electic utility customer is entitled to generate, consume, store, and export electricity produced from eligible energy resources to the electric grid through the use of customer-sited retail distributed generation."
- Storage: SB009 (2018) allows Coloradans to install and use energy storage on their property without unnecessary restrictions, boosting the state’s renewable market and jobs and promoting grid resiliency. HB1270 (2018) directs the PUC to "adopt rules, by February 1, 2019, establishing mechanisms for the procurement of energy storage systems by investor-owned electric utilities, based on an analysis of costs and benefits as well as factors such as grid reliability and a reduction in the need for additional peak generation capacity."

Electricity

Streamline permitting of renewable energy projects

Some Progress

- SB179 (2017) extends the repeal date of existing laws that limit the amount of permit, plan review, or other fees that counties, municipalities, or the state may charge for installing solar energy devices or systems.
- Colorado’s enabling legislation on county planning allows county and regional planning commissions to consider “methods for assuring access to appropriate conditions for solar, wind, or other alternative energy sources” when they create master plans.

Electricity

Streamline permitting of renewable energy projects

Some Progress

- SB179 (2017) extends the repeal date of existing laws that limit the amount of permit, plan review, or other fees that counties, municipalities, or the state may charge for installing solar energy devices or systems.
- Colorado’s enabling legislation on county planning allows county and regional planning commissions to consider “methods for assuring access to appropriate conditions for solar, wind, or other alternative energy sources” when they create master plans.

Electricity

Streamline permitting of renewable energy projects

Some Progress

- SB179 (2017) extends the repeal date of existing laws that limit the amount of permit, plan review, or other fees that counties, municipalities, or the state may charge for installing solar energy devices or systems.
- Colorado’s enabling legislation on county planning allows county and regional planning commissions to consider “methods for assuring access to appropriate conditions for solar, wind, or other alternative energy sources” when they create master plans.

Electricity

Streamline permitting of renewable energy projects

Some Progress

- SB179 (2017) extends the repeal date of existing laws that limit the amount of permit, plan review, or other fees that counties, municipalities, or the state may charge for installing solar energy devices or systems.
- Colorado’s enabling legislation on county planning allows county and regional planning commissions to consider “methods for assuring access to appropriate conditions for solar, wind, or other alternative energy sources” when they create master plans.

Electricity

Streamline permitting of renewable energy projects

Some Progress

- SB179 (2017) extends the repeal date of existing laws that limit the amount of permit, plan review, or other fees that counties, municipalities, or the state may charge for installing solar energy devices or systems.
- Colorado’s enabling legislation on county planning allows county and regional planning commissions to consider “methods for assuring access to appropriate conditions for solar, wind, or other alternative energy sources” when they create master plans.

Electricity

Streamline permitting of renewable energy projects

Some Progress

- SB179 (2017) extends the repeal date of existing laws that limit the amount of permit, plan review, or other fees that counties, municipalities, or the state may charge for installing solar energy devices or systems.
- Colorado’s enabling legislation on county planning allows county and regional planning commissions to consider “methods for assuring access to appropriate conditions for solar, wind, or other alternative energy sources” when they create master plans.

Electricity

Streamline permitting of renewable energy projects

Some Progress

- SB179 (2017) extends the repeal date of existing laws that limit the amount of permit, plan review, or other fees that counties, municipalities, or the state may charge for installing solar energy devices or systems.
- Colorado’s enabling legislation on county planning allows county and regional planning commissions to consider “methods for assuring access to appropriate conditions for solar, wind, or other alternative energy sources” when they create master plans.

Electricity

Streamline permitting of renewable energy projects

Some Progress

- SB179 (2017) extends the repeal date of existing laws that limit the amount of permit, plan review, or other fees that counties, municipalities, or the state may charge for installing solar energy devices or systems.
- Colorado’s enabling legislation on county planning allows county and regional planning commissions to consider “methods for assuring access to appropriate conditions for solar, wind, or other alternative energy sources” when they create master plans.

Electricity

Streamline permitting of renewable energy projects

Some Progress

- SB179 (2017) extends the repeal date of existing laws that limit the amount of permit, plan review, or other fees that counties, municipalities, or the state may charge for installing solar energy devices or systems.
- Colorado’s enabling legislation on county planning allows county and regional planning commissions to consider “methods for assuring access to appropriate conditions for solar, wind, or other alternative energy sources” when they create master plans.

Electricity

Save money and reduce energy waste through Energy Efficiency Resource Standards (EERS)

Some Progress

- HB1037 (2007) amended Colorado statutes C.R.S. 40-1-102 and 40-3.2-101-105 by requiring the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (COPUC) to establish energy savings goals for investor-owned electric and gas utilities.
- HB1227 (2017) extends electric efficiency programs to 2028 and requires the commission to set goals of at least 5% peak demand reduction and 5% energy savings by 2028 for demand-side management programs implemented during 2019 through 2028 when compared to a 2018 baseline.

Electricity

Save money and reduce energy waste through Energy Efficiency Resource Standards (EERS)

Some Progress

- HB1037 (2007) amended Colorado statutes C.R.S. 40-1-102 and 40-3.2-101-105 by requiring the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (COPUC) to establish energy savings goals for investor-owned electric and gas utilities.
- HB1227 (2017) extends electric efficiency programs to 2028 and requires the commission to set goals of at least 5% peak demand reduction and 5% energy savings by 2028 for demand-side management programs implemented during 2019 through 2028 when compared to a 2018 baseline.

Electricity

Save money and reduce energy waste through Energy Efficiency Resource Standards (EERS)

Some Progress

- HB1037 (2007) amended Colorado statutes C.R.S. 40-1-102 and 40-3.2-101-105 by requiring the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (COPUC) to establish energy savings goals for investor-owned electric and gas utilities.
- HB1227 (2017) extends electric efficiency programs to 2028 and requires the commission to set goals of at least 5% peak demand reduction and 5% energy savings by 2028 for demand-side management programs implemented during 2019 through 2028 when compared to a 2018 baseline.

Electricity

Save money and reduce energy waste through Energy Efficiency Resource Standards (EERS)

Some Progress

- HB1037 (2007) amended Colorado statutes C.R.S. 40-1-102 and 40-3.2-101-105 by requiring the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (COPUC) to establish energy savings goals for investor-owned electric and gas utilities.
- HB1227 (2017) extends electric efficiency programs to 2028 and requires the commission to set goals of at least 5% peak demand reduction and 5% energy savings by 2028 for demand-side management programs implemented during 2019 through 2028 when compared to a 2018 baseline.

Electricity

Save money and reduce energy waste through Energy Efficiency Resource Standards (EERS)

Some Progress

- HB1037 (2007) amended Colorado statutes C.R.S. 40-1-102 and 40-3.2-101-105 by requiring the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (COPUC) to establish energy savings goals for investor-owned electric and gas utilities.
- HB1227 (2017) extends electric efficiency programs to 2028 and requires the commission to set goals of at least 5% peak demand reduction and 5% energy savings by 2028 for demand-side management programs implemented during 2019 through 2028 when compared to a 2018 baseline.

Electricity

Save money and reduce energy waste through Energy Efficiency Resource Standards (EERS)

Some Progress

- HB1037 (2007) amended Colorado statutes C.R.S. 40-1-102 and 40-3.2-101-105 by requiring the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (COPUC) to establish energy savings goals for investor-owned electric and gas utilities.
- HB1227 (2017) extends electric efficiency programs to 2028 and requires the commission to set goals of at least 5% peak demand reduction and 5% energy savings by 2028 for demand-side management programs implemented during 2019 through 2028 when compared to a 2018 baseline.

Electricity

Save money and reduce energy waste through Energy Efficiency Resource Standards (EERS)

Some Progress

- HB1037 (2007) amended Colorado statutes C.R.S. 40-1-102 and 40-3.2-101-105 by requiring the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (COPUC) to establish energy savings goals for investor-owned electric and gas utilities.
- HB1227 (2017) extends electric efficiency programs to 2028 and requires the commission to set goals of at least 5% peak demand reduction and 5% energy savings by 2028 for demand-side management programs implemented during 2019 through 2028 when compared to a 2018 baseline.

Electricity

Save money and reduce energy waste through Energy Efficiency Resource Standards (EERS)

Some Progress

- HB1037 (2007) amended Colorado statutes C.R.S. 40-1-102 and 40-3.2-101-105 by requiring the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (COPUC) to establish energy savings goals for investor-owned electric and gas utilities.
- HB1227 (2017) extends electric efficiency programs to 2028 and requires the commission to set goals of at least 5% peak demand reduction and 5% energy savings by 2028 for demand-side management programs implemented during 2019 through 2028 when compared to a 2018 baseline.

Electricity

Save money and reduce energy waste through Energy Efficiency Resource Standards (EERS)

Some Progress

- HB1037 (2007) amended Colorado statutes C.R.S. 40-1-102 and 40-3.2-101-105 by requiring the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (COPUC) to establish energy savings goals for investor-owned electric and gas utilities.
- HB1227 (2017) extends electric efficiency programs to 2028 and requires the commission to set goals of at least 5% peak demand reduction and 5% energy savings by 2028 for demand-side management programs implemented during 2019 through 2028 when compared to a 2018 baseline.

Electricity

Encourage distributed renewable energy generation through Net Energy Metering (NEM) and Community Solar

Significant Progress

- HB1160 (2008) requires municipal utilities with more than 5,000 customers and all cooperative utilities to offer net-metering. The law allows residential systems up to 10 kW in capacity and commercial and industrial systems up to 25 kW to be credited monthly at the retail rate for any net excess generation their systems produce" (Source).
- HB1003 (2019) Community Solar Gardens Modernization Act, expands and updates community solar policy first established in 2010 (HB1342), which notably had a five percent per project carveout to serve low-income families (Source).

Electricity

Encourage distributed renewable energy generation through Net Energy Metering (NEM) and Community Solar

Significant Progress

- HB1160 (2008) requires municipal utilities with more than 5,000 customers and all cooperative utilities to offer net-metering. The law allows residential systems up to 10 kW in capacity and commercial and industrial systems up to 25 kW to be credited monthly at the retail rate for any net excess generation their systems produce" (Source).
- HB1003 (2019) Community Solar Gardens Modernization Act, expands and updates community solar policy first established in 2010 (HB1342), which notably had a five percent per project carveout to serve low-income families (Source).

Electricity

Encourage distributed renewable energy generation through Net Energy Metering (NEM) and Community Solar

Significant Progress

- HB1160 (2008) requires municipal utilities with more than 5,000 customers and all cooperative utilities to offer net-metering. The law allows residential systems up to 10 kW in capacity and commercial and industrial systems up to 25 kW to be credited monthly at the retail rate for any net excess generation their systems produce" (Source).
- HB1003 (2019) Community Solar Gardens Modernization Act, expands and updates community solar policy first established in 2010 (HB1342), which notably had a five percent per project carveout to serve low-income families (Source).

Electricity

Encourage distributed renewable energy generation through Net Energy Metering (NEM) and Community Solar

Significant Progress

- HB1160 (2008) requires municipal utilities with more than 5,000 customers and all cooperative utilities to offer net-metering. The law allows residential systems up to 10 kW in capacity and commercial and industrial systems up to 25 kW to be credited monthly at the retail rate for any net excess generation their systems produce" (Source).
- HB1003 (2019) Community Solar Gardens Modernization Act, expands and updates community solar policy first established in 2010 (HB1342), which notably had a five percent per project carveout to serve low-income families (Source).

Electricity

Encourage distributed renewable energy generation through Net Energy Metering (NEM) and Community Solar

Significant Progress

- HB1160 (2008) requires municipal utilities with more than 5,000 customers and all cooperative utilities to offer net-metering. The law allows residential systems up to 10 kW in capacity and commercial and industrial systems up to 25 kW to be credited monthly at the retail rate for any net excess generation their systems produce" (Source).
- HB1003 (2019) Community Solar Gardens Modernization Act, expands and updates community solar policy first established in 2010 (HB1342), which notably had a five percent per project carveout to serve low-income families (Source).

Electricity

Encourage distributed renewable energy generation through Net Energy Metering (NEM) and Community Solar

Significant Progress

- HB1160 (2008) requires municipal utilities with more than 5,000 customers and all cooperative utilities to offer net-metering. The law allows residential systems up to 10 kW in capacity and commercial and industrial systems up to 25 kW to be credited monthly at the retail rate for any net excess generation their systems produce" (Source).
- HB1003 (2019) Community Solar Gardens Modernization Act, expands and updates community solar policy first established in 2010 (HB1342), which notably had a five percent per project carveout to serve low-income families (Source).

Electricity

Encourage distributed renewable energy generation through Net Energy Metering (NEM) and Community Solar

Significant Progress

- HB1160 (2008) requires municipal utilities with more than 5,000 customers and all cooperative utilities to offer net-metering. The law allows residential systems up to 10 kW in capacity and commercial and industrial systems up to 25 kW to be credited monthly at the retail rate for any net excess generation their systems produce" (Source).
- HB1003 (2019) Community Solar Gardens Modernization Act, expands and updates community solar policy first established in 2010 (HB1342), which notably had a five percent per project carveout to serve low-income families (Source).

Electricity

Encourage distributed renewable energy generation through Net Energy Metering (NEM) and Community Solar

Significant Progress

- HB1160 (2008) requires municipal utilities with more than 5,000 customers and all cooperative utilities to offer net-metering. The law allows residential systems up to 10 kW in capacity and commercial and industrial systems up to 25 kW to be credited monthly at the retail rate for any net excess generation their systems produce" (Source).
- HB1003 (2019) Community Solar Gardens Modernization Act, expands and updates community solar policy first established in 2010 (HB1342), which notably had a five percent per project carveout to serve low-income families (Source).

Electricity

Encourage distributed renewable energy generation through Net Energy Metering (NEM) and Community Solar

Significant Progress

- HB1160 (2008) requires municipal utilities with more than 5,000 customers and all cooperative utilities to offer net-metering. The law allows residential systems up to 10 kW in capacity and commercial and industrial systems up to 25 kW to be credited monthly at the retail rate for any net excess generation their systems produce" (Source).
- HB1003 (2019) Community Solar Gardens Modernization Act, expands and updates community solar policy first established in 2010 (HB1342), which notably had a five percent per project carveout to serve low-income families (Source).

Electricity

Align utility incentives with climate goals through Performance-Based Ratemaking (PBR) and decoupling

Some Progress

- Performance-Based Ratemaking: Colorado is in the early exploration phase on this based on a provision in SB236 (2019) that called for an investigation of performance-based ratemaking, with a report due to the Senate Transportation and Energy Committee within 18 months (November 2020).
- Decoupling: Investor-owned utility Xcel Energy is authorized to implement a revenue decoupling adjustment trial from 2017–2021. The trial includes electric residential and small commercial customers and was approved by Colorado PUC in proceeding 16A-0546E ("Public Service Company - Revenue Decoupling Adjustment")

Electricity

Align utility incentives with climate goals through Performance-Based Ratemaking (PBR) and decoupling

Some Progress

- Performance-Based Ratemaking: Colorado is in the early exploration phase on this based on a provision in SB236 (2019) that called for an investigation of performance-based ratemaking, with a report due to the Senate Transportation and Energy Committee within 18 months (November 2020).
- Decoupling: Investor-owned utility Xcel Energy is authorized to implement a revenue decoupling adjustment trial from 2017–2021. The trial includes electric residential and small commercial customers and was approved by Colorado PUC in proceeding 16A-0546E ("Public Service Company - Revenue Decoupling Adjustment")

Electricity

Align utility incentives with climate goals through Performance-Based Ratemaking (PBR) and decoupling

Some Progress

- Performance-Based Ratemaking: Colorado is in the early exploration phase on this based on a provision in SB236 (2019) that called for an investigation of performance-based ratemaking, with a report due to the Senate Transportation and Energy Committee within 18 months (November 2020).
- Decoupling: Investor-owned utility Xcel Energy is authorized to implement a revenue decoupling adjustment trial from 2017–2021. The trial includes electric residential and small commercial customers and was approved by Colorado PUC in proceeding 16A-0546E ("Public Service Company - Revenue Decoupling Adjustment")

Electricity

Align utility incentives with climate goals through Performance-Based Ratemaking (PBR) and decoupling

Some Progress

- Performance-Based Ratemaking: Colorado is in the early exploration phase on this based on a provision in SB236 (2019) that called for an investigation of performance-based ratemaking, with a report due to the Senate Transportation and Energy Committee within 18 months (November 2020).
- Decoupling: Investor-owned utility Xcel Energy is authorized to implement a revenue decoupling adjustment trial from 2017–2021. The trial includes electric residential and small commercial customers and was approved by Colorado PUC in proceeding 16A-0546E ("Public Service Company - Revenue Decoupling Adjustment")

Electricity

Align utility incentives with climate goals through Performance-Based Ratemaking (PBR) and decoupling

Some Progress

- Performance-Based Ratemaking: Colorado is in the early exploration phase on this based on a provision in SB236 (2019) that called for an investigation of performance-based ratemaking, with a report due to the Senate Transportation and Energy Committee within 18 months (November 2020).
- Decoupling: Investor-owned utility Xcel Energy is authorized to implement a revenue decoupling adjustment trial from 2017–2021. The trial includes electric residential and small commercial customers and was approved by Colorado PUC in proceeding 16A-0546E ("Public Service Company - Revenue Decoupling Adjustment")

Electricity

Align utility incentives with climate goals through Performance-Based Ratemaking (PBR) and decoupling

Some Progress

- Performance-Based Ratemaking: Colorado is in the early exploration phase on this based on a provision in SB236 (2019) that called for an investigation of performance-based ratemaking, with a report due to the Senate Transportation and Energy Committee within 18 months (November 2020).
- Decoupling: Investor-owned utility Xcel Energy is authorized to implement a revenue decoupling adjustment trial from 2017–2021. The trial includes electric residential and small commercial customers and was approved by Colorado PUC in proceeding 16A-0546E ("Public Service Company - Revenue Decoupling Adjustment")

Electricity

Align utility incentives with climate goals through Performance-Based Ratemaking (PBR) and decoupling

Some Progress

- Performance-Based Ratemaking: Colorado is in the early exploration phase on this based on a provision in SB236 (2019) that called for an investigation of performance-based ratemaking, with a report due to the Senate Transportation and Energy Committee within 18 months (November 2020).
- Decoupling: Investor-owned utility Xcel Energy is authorized to implement a revenue decoupling adjustment trial from 2017–2021. The trial includes electric residential and small commercial customers and was approved by Colorado PUC in proceeding 16A-0546E ("Public Service Company - Revenue Decoupling Adjustment")

Electricity

Align utility incentives with climate goals through Performance-Based Ratemaking (PBR) and decoupling

Some Progress

- Performance-Based Ratemaking: Colorado is in the early exploration phase on this based on a provision in SB236 (2019) that called for an investigation of performance-based ratemaking, with a report due to the Senate Transportation and Energy Committee within 18 months (November 2020).
- Decoupling: Investor-owned utility Xcel Energy is authorized to implement a revenue decoupling adjustment trial from 2017–2021. The trial includes electric residential and small commercial customers and was approved by Colorado PUC in proceeding 16A-0546E ("Public Service Company - Revenue Decoupling Adjustment")

Electricity

Align utility incentives with climate goals through Performance-Based Ratemaking (PBR) and decoupling

Some Progress

- Performance-Based Ratemaking: Colorado is in the early exploration phase on this based on a provision in SB236 (2019) that called for an investigation of performance-based ratemaking, with a report due to the Senate Transportation and Energy Committee within 18 months (November 2020).
- Decoupling: Investor-owned utility Xcel Energy is authorized to implement a revenue decoupling adjustment trial from 2017–2021. The trial includes electric residential and small commercial customers and was approved by Colorado PUC in proceeding 16A-0546E ("Public Service Company - Revenue Decoupling Adjustment")

Electricity

Consider the Social Cost of Carbon (SCC) in energy decisions

Significant Progress

SB236 (2019) directs Colorado utilities to generate more carbon-free electricity and consider the “social cost” of carbon when planning future energy projects, boosting the state's clean energy transition and ensuring the cost of climate change is considered in decisions.

Electricity

Consider the Social Cost of Carbon (SCC) in energy decisions

Significant Progress

SB236 (2019) directs Colorado utilities to generate more carbon-free electricity and consider the “social cost” of carbon when planning future energy projects, boosting the state's clean energy transition and ensuring the cost of climate change is considered in decisions.

Electricity

Consider the Social Cost of Carbon (SCC) in energy decisions

Significant Progress

SB236 (2019) directs Colorado utilities to generate more carbon-free electricity and consider the “social cost” of carbon when planning future energy projects, boosting the state's clean energy transition and ensuring the cost of climate change is considered in decisions.

Electricity

Consider the Social Cost of Carbon (SCC) in energy decisions

Significant Progress

SB236 (2019) directs Colorado utilities to generate more carbon-free electricity and consider the “social cost” of carbon when planning future energy projects, boosting the state's clean energy transition and ensuring the cost of climate change is considered in decisions.

Electricity

Consider the Social Cost of Carbon (SCC) in energy decisions

Significant Progress

SB236 (2019) directs Colorado utilities to generate more carbon-free electricity and consider the “social cost” of carbon when planning future energy projects, boosting the state's clean energy transition and ensuring the cost of climate change is considered in decisions.

Electricity

Consider the Social Cost of Carbon (SCC) in energy decisions

Significant Progress

SB236 (2019) directs Colorado utilities to generate more carbon-free electricity and consider the “social cost” of carbon when planning future energy projects, boosting the state's clean energy transition and ensuring the cost of climate change is considered in decisions.

Electricity

Consider the Social Cost of Carbon (SCC) in energy decisions

Significant Progress

SB236 (2019) directs Colorado utilities to generate more carbon-free electricity and consider the “social cost” of carbon when planning future energy projects, boosting the state's clean energy transition and ensuring the cost of climate change is considered in decisions.

Electricity

Consider the Social Cost of Carbon (SCC) in energy decisions

Significant Progress

SB236 (2019) directs Colorado utilities to generate more carbon-free electricity and consider the “social cost” of carbon when planning future energy projects, boosting the state's clean energy transition and ensuring the cost of climate change is considered in decisions.

Electricity

Consider the Social Cost of Carbon (SCC) in energy decisions

Significant Progress

SB236 (2019) directs Colorado utilities to generate more carbon-free electricity and consider the “social cost” of carbon when planning future energy projects, boosting the state's clean energy transition and ensuring the cost of climate change is considered in decisions.

Electricity

Make utilities more accountable by creating Intervenor Compensation Programs (ICPs)

Little or No Progress

Colorado does not have an Intervenor Compensation Program (ICP) in place at this time, per their Guide to Public Participation in Public Utilities Commission Proceedings.

Electricity

Make utilities more accountable by creating Intervenor Compensation Programs (ICPs)

Little or No Progress

Colorado does not have an Intervenor Compensation Program (ICP) in place at this time, per their Guide to Public Participation in Public Utilities Commission Proceedings.

Electricity

Make utilities more accountable by creating Intervenor Compensation Programs (ICPs)

Little or No Progress

Colorado does not have an Intervenor Compensation Program (ICP) in place at this time, per their Guide to Public Participation in Public Utilities Commission Proceedings.

Electricity

Make utilities more accountable by creating Intervenor Compensation Programs (ICPs)

Little or No Progress

Colorado does not have an Intervenor Compensation Program (ICP) in place at this time, per their Guide to Public Participation in Public Utilities Commission Proceedings.

Electricity

Make utilities more accountable by creating Intervenor Compensation Programs (ICPs)

Little or No Progress

Colorado does not have an Intervenor Compensation Program (ICP) in place at this time, per their Guide to Public Participation in Public Utilities Commission Proceedings.

Electricity

Make utilities more accountable by creating Intervenor Compensation Programs (ICPs)

Little or No Progress

Colorado does not have an Intervenor Compensation Program (ICP) in place at this time, per their Guide to Public Participation in Public Utilities Commission Proceedings.

Electricity

Make utilities more accountable by creating Intervenor Compensation Programs (ICPs)

Little or No Progress

Colorado does not have an Intervenor Compensation Program (ICP) in place at this time, per their Guide to Public Participation in Public Utilities Commission Proceedings.

Electricity

Make utilities more accountable by creating Intervenor Compensation Programs (ICPs)

Little or No Progress

Colorado does not have an Intervenor Compensation Program (ICP) in place at this time, per their Guide to Public Participation in Public Utilities Commission Proceedings.

Electricity

Make utilities more accountable by creating Intervenor Compensation Programs (ICPs)

Little or No Progress

Colorado does not have an Intervenor Compensation Program (ICP) in place at this time, per their Guide to Public Participation in Public Utilities Commission Proceedings.

Electricity

Provide financial incentives to encourage clean energy and energy efficiency

Some Progress

- Colorado has tax incentives for Residential Renewable Energy (Colorado Revised Statutes § 39-1-102 and 39-3-102) & Community Solar Gardens (C.R.S. § 39-3-118.7), plus the ability for county/municipal Local Renewable Energy Incentives and Rebates (C.R.S. §§ 30-11-107.3 and 31-20-101.3).
- HB1219 (2015) creates an enterprise zone investment tax credit refund for renewable energy projects, incentivizing investments in renewable energy projects built in Colorado.
- HB1332 (2016) updates and streamlines an existing clean vehicle tax credit, makes it easier for buyers to understand the benefits of purchasing clean vehicles.
- HB1159 (2019) extends electric vehicle tax credits to 2025, which will help Coloradans save money on fuel, boost the clean energy economy, and clean up the air.

Electricity

Provide financial incentives to encourage clean energy and energy efficiency

Some Progress

- Colorado has tax incentives for Residential Renewable Energy (Colorado Revised Statutes § 39-1-102 and 39-3-102) & Community Solar Gardens (C.R.S. § 39-3-118.7), plus the ability for county/municipal Local Renewable Energy Incentives and Rebates (C.R.S. §§ 30-11-107.3 and 31-20-101.3).
- HB1219 (2015) creates an enterprise zone investment tax credit refund for renewable energy projects, incentivizing investments in renewable energy projects built in Colorado.
- HB1332 (2016) updates and streamlines an existing clean vehicle tax credit, makes it easier for buyers to understand the benefits of purchasing clean vehicles.
- HB1159 (2019) extends electric vehicle tax credits to 2025, which will help Coloradans save money on fuel, boost the clean energy economy, and clean up the air.

Electricity

Provide financial incentives to encourage clean energy and energy efficiency

Some Progress

- Colorado has tax incentives for Residential Renewable Energy (Colorado Revised Statutes § 39-1-102 and 39-3-102) & Community Solar Gardens (C.R.S. § 39-3-118.7), plus the ability for county/municipal Local Renewable Energy Incentives and Rebates (C.R.S. §§ 30-11-107.3 and 31-20-101.3).
- HB1219 (2015) creates an enterprise zone investment tax credit refund for renewable energy projects, incentivizing investments in renewable energy projects built in Colorado.
- HB1332 (2016) updates and streamlines an existing clean vehicle tax credit, makes it easier for buyers to understand the benefits of purchasing clean vehicles.
- HB1159 (2019) extends electric vehicle tax credits to 2025, which will help Coloradans save money on fuel, boost the clean energy economy, and clean up the air.

Electricity

Provide financial incentives to encourage clean energy and energy efficiency

Some Progress

- Colorado has tax incentives for Residential Renewable Energy (Colorado Revised Statutes § 39-1-102 and 39-3-102) & Community Solar Gardens (C.R.S. § 39-3-118.7), plus the ability for county/municipal Local Renewable Energy Incentives and Rebates (C.R.S. §§ 30-11-107.3 and 31-20-101.3).
- HB1219 (2015) creates an enterprise zone investment tax credit refund for renewable energy projects, incentivizing investments in renewable energy projects built in Colorado.
- HB1332 (2016) updates and streamlines an existing clean vehicle tax credit, makes it easier for buyers to understand the benefits of purchasing clean vehicles.
- HB1159 (2019) extends electric vehicle tax credits to 2025, which will help Coloradans save money on fuel, boost the clean energy economy, and clean up the air.

Electricity

Provide financial incentives to encourage clean energy and energy efficiency

Some Progress

- Colorado has tax incentives for Residential Renewable Energy (Colorado Revised Statutes § 39-1-102 and 39-3-102) & Community Solar Gardens (C.R.S. § 39-3-118.7), plus the ability for county/municipal Local Renewable Energy Incentives and Rebates (C.R.S. §§ 30-11-107.3 and 31-20-101.3).
- HB1219 (2015) creates an enterprise zone investment tax credit refund for renewable energy projects, incentivizing investments in renewable energy projects built in Colorado.
- HB1332 (2016) updates and streamlines an existing clean vehicle tax credit, makes it easier for buyers to understand the benefits of purchasing clean vehicles.
- HB1159 (2019) extends electric vehicle tax credits to 2025, which will help Coloradans save money on fuel, boost the clean energy economy, and clean up the air.

Electricity

Provide financial incentives to encourage clean energy and energy efficiency

Some Progress

- Colorado has tax incentives for Residential Renewable Energy (Colorado Revised Statutes § 39-1-102 and 39-3-102) & Community Solar Gardens (C.R.S. § 39-3-118.7), plus the ability for county/municipal Local Renewable Energy Incentives and Rebates (C.R.S. §§ 30-11-107.3 and 31-20-101.3).
- HB1219 (2015) creates an enterprise zone investment tax credit refund for renewable energy projects, incentivizing investments in renewable energy projects built in Colorado.
- HB1332 (2016) updates and streamlines an existing clean vehicle tax credit, makes it easier for buyers to understand the benefits of purchasing clean vehicles.
- HB1159 (2019) extends electric vehicle tax credits to 2025, which will help Coloradans save money on fuel, boost the clean energy economy, and clean up the air.

Electricity

Provide financial incentives to encourage clean energy and energy efficiency

Some Progress

- Colorado has tax incentives for Residential Renewable Energy (Colorado Revised Statutes § 39-1-102 and 39-3-102) & Community Solar Gardens (C.R.S. § 39-3-118.7), plus the ability for county/municipal Local Renewable Energy Incentives and Rebates (C.R.S. §§ 30-11-107.3 and 31-20-101.3).
- HB1219 (2015) creates an enterprise zone investment tax credit refund for renewable energy projects, incentivizing investments in renewable energy projects built in Colorado.
- HB1332 (2016) updates and streamlines an existing clean vehicle tax credit, makes it easier for buyers to understand the benefits of purchasing clean vehicles.
- HB1159 (2019) extends electric vehicle tax credits to 2025, which will help Coloradans save money on fuel, boost the clean energy economy, and clean up the air.

Electricity

Provide financial incentives to encourage clean energy and energy efficiency

Some Progress

- Colorado has tax incentives for Residential Renewable Energy (Colorado Revised Statutes § 39-1-102 and 39-3-102) & Community Solar Gardens (C.R.S. § 39-3-118.7), plus the ability for county/municipal Local Renewable Energy Incentives and Rebates (C.R.S. §§ 30-11-107.3 and 31-20-101.3).
- HB1219 (2015) creates an enterprise zone investment tax credit refund for renewable energy projects, incentivizing investments in renewable energy projects built in Colorado.
- HB1332 (2016) updates and streamlines an existing clean vehicle tax credit, makes it easier for buyers to understand the benefits of purchasing clean vehicles.
- HB1159 (2019) extends electric vehicle tax credits to 2025, which will help Coloradans save money on fuel, boost the clean energy economy, and clean up the air.

Electricity

Provide financial incentives to encourage clean energy and energy efficiency

Some Progress

- Colorado has tax incentives for Residential Renewable Energy (Colorado Revised Statutes § 39-1-102 and 39-3-102) & Community Solar Gardens (C.R.S. § 39-3-118.7), plus the ability for county/municipal Local Renewable Energy Incentives and Rebates (C.R.S. §§ 30-11-107.3 and 31-20-101.3).
- HB1219 (2015) creates an enterprise zone investment tax credit refund for renewable energy projects, incentivizing investments in renewable energy projects built in Colorado.
- HB1332 (2016) updates and streamlines an existing clean vehicle tax credit, makes it easier for buyers to understand the benefits of purchasing clean vehicles.
- HB1159 (2019) extends electric vehicle tax credits to 2025, which will help Coloradans save money on fuel, boost the clean energy economy, and clean up the air.

Electricity

Promote and enable Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs)

Significant Progress

The Colorado Energy Office is noted as establishing and monitoring standards for ESCOs as early as 2012.

Electricity

Promote and enable Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs)

Significant Progress

The Colorado Energy Office is noted as establishing and monitoring standards for ESCOs as early as 2012.

Electricity

Promote and enable Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs)

Significant Progress

The Colorado Energy Office is noted as establishing and monitoring standards for ESCOs as early as 2012.

Electricity

Promote and enable Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs)

Significant Progress

The Colorado Energy Office is noted as establishing and monitoring standards for ESCOs as early as 2012.

Electricity

Promote and enable Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs)

Significant Progress

The Colorado Energy Office is noted as establishing and monitoring standards for ESCOs as early as 2012.

Electricity

Promote and enable Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs)

Significant Progress

The Colorado Energy Office is noted as establishing and monitoring standards for ESCOs as early as 2012.

Electricity

Promote and enable Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs)

Significant Progress

The Colorado Energy Office is noted as establishing and monitoring standards for ESCOs as early as 2012.

Electricity

Promote and enable Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs)

Significant Progress

The Colorado Energy Office is noted as establishing and monitoring standards for ESCOs as early as 2012.

Electricity

Promote and enable Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs)

Significant Progress

The Colorado Energy Office is noted as establishing and monitoring standards for ESCOs as early as 2012.

Electricity

- Active statewide commercial PACE program (CO C-PACE). Colorado PACE financing offers property owners a new tool to finance energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy projects. PACE financing is available in counties and municipalities throughout the state. Source.
- The Colorado C-PACE program is an initiative of the New Energy Improvement District (NEID) which was authorized by The Colorado General Assembly’s passage of the New Energy Jobs Creation Act of 2010 (HB1328 (2010)), as amended by the New Energy Jobs Act of 2013 (SB212 (2013)) and SB171, enacted in 2014. These statutory provisions are codified at C.R.S. 32-20-101 et seq. (collectively, the “C-PACE Statute”).

Electricity

- Active statewide commercial PACE program (CO C-PACE). Colorado PACE financing offers property owners a new tool to finance energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy projects. PACE financing is available in counties and municipalities throughout the state. Source.
- The Colorado C-PACE program is an initiative of the New Energy Improvement District (NEID) which was authorized by The Colorado General Assembly’s passage of the New Energy Jobs Creation Act of 2010 (HB1328 (2010)), as amended by the New Energy Jobs Act of 2013 (SB212 (2013)) and SB171, enacted in 2014. These statutory provisions are codified at C.R.S. 32-20-101 et seq. (collectively, the “C-PACE Statute”).

Electricity

- Active statewide commercial PACE program (CO C-PACE). Colorado PACE financing offers property owners a new tool to finance energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy projects. PACE financing is available in counties and municipalities throughout the state. Source.
- The Colorado C-PACE program is an initiative of the New Energy Improvement District (NEID) which was authorized by The Colorado General Assembly’s passage of the New Energy Jobs Creation Act of 2010 (HB1328 (2010)), as amended by the New Energy Jobs Act of 2013 (SB212 (2013)) and SB171, enacted in 2014. These statutory provisions are codified at C.R.S. 32-20-101 et seq. (collectively, the “C-PACE Statute”).

Electricity

- Active statewide commercial PACE program (CO C-PACE). Colorado PACE financing offers property owners a new tool to finance energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy projects. PACE financing is available in counties and municipalities throughout the state. Source.
- The Colorado C-PACE program is an initiative of the New Energy Improvement District (NEID) which was authorized by The Colorado General Assembly’s passage of the New Energy Jobs Creation Act of 2010 (HB1328 (2010)), as amended by the New Energy Jobs Act of 2013 (SB212 (2013)) and SB171, enacted in 2014. These statutory provisions are codified at C.R.S. 32-20-101 et seq. (collectively, the “C-PACE Statute”).

Electricity

- Active statewide commercial PACE program (CO C-PACE). Colorado PACE financing offers property owners a new tool to finance energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy projects. PACE financing is available in counties and municipalities throughout the state. Source.
- The Colorado C-PACE program is an initiative of the New Energy Improvement District (NEID) which was authorized by The Colorado General Assembly’s passage of the New Energy Jobs Creation Act of 2010 (HB1328 (2010)), as amended by the New Energy Jobs Act of 2013 (SB212 (2013)) and SB171, enacted in 2014. These statutory provisions are codified at C.R.S. 32-20-101 et seq. (collectively, the “C-PACE Statute”).

Electricity

- Active statewide commercial PACE program (CO C-PACE). Colorado PACE financing offers property owners a new tool to finance energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy projects. PACE financing is available in counties and municipalities throughout the state. Source.
- The Colorado C-PACE program is an initiative of the New Energy Improvement District (NEID) which was authorized by The Colorado General Assembly’s passage of the New Energy Jobs Creation Act of 2010 (HB1328 (2010)), as amended by the New Energy Jobs Act of 2013 (SB212 (2013)) and SB171, enacted in 2014. These statutory provisions are codified at C.R.S. 32-20-101 et seq. (collectively, the “C-PACE Statute”).

Electricity

- Active statewide commercial PACE program (CO C-PACE). Colorado PACE financing offers property owners a new tool to finance energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy projects. PACE financing is available in counties and municipalities throughout the state. Source.
- The Colorado C-PACE program is an initiative of the New Energy Improvement District (NEID) which was authorized by The Colorado General Assembly’s passage of the New Energy Jobs Creation Act of 2010 (HB1328 (2010)), as amended by the New Energy Jobs Act of 2013 (SB212 (2013)) and SB171, enacted in 2014. These statutory provisions are codified at C.R.S. 32-20-101 et seq. (collectively, the “C-PACE Statute”).

Electricity

- Active statewide commercial PACE program (CO C-PACE). Colorado PACE financing offers property owners a new tool to finance energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy projects. PACE financing is available in counties and municipalities throughout the state. Source.
- The Colorado C-PACE program is an initiative of the New Energy Improvement District (NEID) which was authorized by The Colorado General Assembly’s passage of the New Energy Jobs Creation Act of 2010 (HB1328 (2010)), as amended by the New Energy Jobs Act of 2013 (SB212 (2013)) and SB171, enacted in 2014. These statutory provisions are codified at C.R.S. 32-20-101 et seq. (collectively, the “C-PACE Statute”).

Electricity

- Active statewide commercial PACE program (CO C-PACE). Colorado PACE financing offers property owners a new tool to finance energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy projects. PACE financing is available in counties and municipalities throughout the state. Source.
- The Colorado C-PACE program is an initiative of the New Energy Improvement District (NEID) which was authorized by The Colorado General Assembly’s passage of the New Energy Jobs Creation Act of 2010 (HB1328 (2010)), as amended by the New Energy Jobs Act of 2013 (SB212 (2013)) and SB171, enacted in 2014. These statutory provisions are codified at C.R.S. 32-20-101 et seq. (collectively, the “C-PACE Statute”).

Electricity

Establish a statewide Revolving Loan Fund (RLF)

Little or No Progress

- Colorado has a brownfields revolving loan fund available for the clean-up of environmentally contaminated commercial sites, but does not have an RLF for clean energy investment.

Electricity

Establish a statewide Revolving Loan Fund (RLF)

Little or No Progress

- Colorado has a brownfields revolving loan fund available for the clean-up of environmentally contaminated commercial sites, but does not have an RLF for clean energy investment.

Electricity

Establish a statewide Revolving Loan Fund (RLF)

Little or No Progress

- Colorado has a brownfields revolving loan fund available for the clean-up of environmentally contaminated commercial sites, but does not have an RLF for clean energy investment.

Electricity

Establish a statewide Revolving Loan Fund (RLF)

Little or No Progress

- Colorado has a brownfields revolving loan fund available for the clean-up of environmentally contaminated commercial sites, but does not have an RLF for clean energy investment.

Electricity

Establish a statewide Revolving Loan Fund (RLF)

Little or No Progress

- Colorado has a brownfields revolving loan fund available for the clean-up of environmentally contaminated commercial sites, but does not have an RLF for clean energy investment.

Electricity

Establish a statewide Revolving Loan Fund (RLF)

Little or No Progress

- Colorado has a brownfields revolving loan fund available for the clean-up of environmentally contaminated commercial sites, but does not have an RLF for clean energy investment.

Electricity

Establish a statewide Revolving Loan Fund (RLF)

Little or No Progress

- Colorado has a brownfields revolving loan fund available for the clean-up of environmentally contaminated commercial sites, but does not have an RLF for clean energy investment.

Electricity

Establish a statewide Revolving Loan Fund (RLF)

Little or No Progress

- Colorado has a brownfields revolving loan fund available for the clean-up of environmentally contaminated commercial sites, but does not have an RLF for clean energy investment.

Electricity

Establish a statewide Revolving Loan Fund (RLF)

Little or No Progress

- Colorado has a brownfields revolving loan fund available for the clean-up of environmentally contaminated commercial sites, but does not have an RLF for clean energy investment.

Electricity

Establish or expand statewide or local Green Banks or Clean Energy Funds (CEFs)

Some Progress

Colorado Clean Energy Fund (CCEF) was launched in 2018 as a collaboration among the Colorado Energy Office (CEO), the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Coalition for Green Capital (CGC). Executive branch initiative in response to Colorado Climate Action Plan (HB1261 (2019)).

Electricity

Establish or expand statewide or local Green Banks or Clean Energy Funds (CEFs)

Some Progress

Colorado Clean Energy Fund (CCEF) was launched in 2018 as a collaboration among the Colorado Energy Office (CEO), the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Coalition for Green Capital (CGC). Executive branch initiative in response to Colorado Climate Action Plan (HB1261 (2019)).

Electricity

Establish or expand statewide or local Green Banks or Clean Energy Funds (CEFs)

Some Progress

Colorado Clean Energy Fund (CCEF) was launched in 2018 as a collaboration among the Colorado Energy Office (CEO), the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Coalition for Green Capital (CGC). Executive branch initiative in response to Colorado Climate Action Plan (HB1261 (2019)).

Electricity

Establish or expand statewide or local Green Banks or Clean Energy Funds (CEFs)

Some Progress

Colorado Clean Energy Fund (CCEF) was launched in 2018 as a collaboration among the Colorado Energy Office (CEO), the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Coalition for Green Capital (CGC). Executive branch initiative in response to Colorado Climate Action Plan (HB1261 (2019)).

Electricity

Establish or expand statewide or local Green Banks or Clean Energy Funds (CEFs)

Some Progress

Colorado Clean Energy Fund (CCEF) was launched in 2018 as a collaboration among the Colorado Energy Office (CEO), the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Coalition for Green Capital (CGC). Executive branch initiative in response to Colorado Climate Action Plan (HB1261 (2019)).

Electricity

Establish or expand statewide or local Green Banks or Clean Energy Funds (CEFs)

Some Progress

Colorado Clean Energy Fund (CCEF) was launched in 2018 as a collaboration among the Colorado Energy Office (CEO), the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Coalition for Green Capital (CGC). Executive branch initiative in response to Colorado Climate Action Plan (HB1261 (2019)).

Electricity

Establish or expand statewide or local Green Banks or Clean Energy Funds (CEFs)

Some Progress

Colorado Clean Energy Fund (CCEF) was launched in 2018 as a collaboration among the Colorado Energy Office (CEO), the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Coalition for Green Capital (CGC). Executive branch initiative in response to Colorado Climate Action Plan (HB1261 (2019)).

Electricity

Establish or expand statewide or local Green Banks or Clean Energy Funds (CEFs)

Some Progress

Colorado Clean Energy Fund (CCEF) was launched in 2018 as a collaboration among the Colorado Energy Office (CEO), the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Coalition for Green Capital (CGC). Executive branch initiative in response to Colorado Climate Action Plan (HB1261 (2019)).

Electricity

Establish or expand statewide or local Green Banks or Clean Energy Funds (CEFs)

Some Progress

Colorado Clean Energy Fund (CCEF) was launched in 2018 as a collaboration among the Colorado Energy Office (CEO), the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Coalition for Green Capital (CGC). Executive branch initiative in response to Colorado Climate Action Plan (HB1261 (2019)).

Electricity

Fund Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) Efforts

Some Progress

- The Colorado Energy Office funds institutions and projects that conduct clean energy research including the Center for Renewable Energy Economic Development (CREED), "a catalyst for economic development in Colorado through clean energy and energy efficiency innovation and entrepreneurship."

Electricity

Fund Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) Efforts

Some Progress

- The Colorado Energy Office funds institutions and projects that conduct clean energy research including the Center for Renewable Energy Economic Development (CREED), "a catalyst for economic development in Colorado through clean energy and energy efficiency innovation and entrepreneurship."

Electricity

Fund Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) Efforts

Some Progress

- The Colorado Energy Office funds institutions and projects that conduct clean energy research including the Center for Renewable Energy Economic Development (CREED), "a catalyst for economic development in Colorado through clean energy and energy efficiency innovation and entrepreneurship."

Electricity

Fund Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) Efforts

Some Progress

- The Colorado Energy Office funds institutions and projects that conduct clean energy research including the Center for Renewable Energy Economic Development (CREED), "a catalyst for economic development in Colorado through clean energy and energy efficiency innovation and entrepreneurship."

Electricity

Fund Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) Efforts

Some Progress

- The Colorado Energy Office funds institutions and projects that conduct clean energy research including the Center for Renewable Energy Economic Development (CREED), "a catalyst for economic development in Colorado through clean energy and energy efficiency innovation and entrepreneurship."

Electricity

Fund Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) Efforts

Some Progress

- The Colorado Energy Office funds institutions and projects that conduct clean energy research including the Center for Renewable Energy Economic Development (CREED), "a catalyst for economic development in Colorado through clean energy and energy efficiency innovation and entrepreneurship."

Electricity

Fund Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) Efforts

Some Progress

- The Colorado Energy Office funds institutions and projects that conduct clean energy research including the Center for Renewable Energy Economic Development (CREED), "a catalyst for economic development in Colorado through clean energy and energy efficiency innovation and entrepreneurship."

Electricity

Fund Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) Efforts

Some Progress

- The Colorado Energy Office funds institutions and projects that conduct clean energy research including the Center for Renewable Energy Economic Development (CREED), "a catalyst for economic development in Colorado through clean energy and energy efficiency innovation and entrepreneurship."

Electricity

Fund Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) Efforts

Some Progress

- The Colorado Energy Office funds institutions and projects that conduct clean energy research including the Center for Renewable Energy Economic Development (CREED), "a catalyst for economic development in Colorado through clean energy and energy efficiency innovation and entrepreneurship."

Electricity

Washington Clean Energy Transformation Act
SB5116 (2019-2020)

Not Applicable

Electricity

Washington Clean Energy Transformation Act
SB5116 (2019-2020)

Not Applicable

Electricity

Washington Clean Energy Transformation Act
SB5116 (2019-2020)

Not Applicable

Electricity

Washington Clean Energy Transformation Act
SB5116 (2019-2020)

Not Applicable

Electricity

Washington Clean Energy Transformation Act
SB5116 (2019-2020)

Not Applicable

Electricity

Washington Clean Energy Transformation Act
SB5116 (2019-2020)

Not Applicable

Electricity

Washington Clean Energy Transformation Act
SB5116 (2019-2020)

Not Applicable

Electricity

Washington Clean Energy Transformation Act
SB5116 (2019-2020)

Not Applicable

Electricity

Washington Clean Energy Transformation Act
SB5116 (2019-2020)

Not Applicable

Electricity

Virginia Clean Economy Act
HB1526 (2020)

Not Applicable

Electricity

Virginia Clean Economy Act
HB1526 (2020)

Not Applicable

Electricity

Virginia Clean Economy Act
HB1526 (2020)

Not Applicable

Electricity

Virginia Clean Economy Act
HB1526 (2020)

Not Applicable

Electricity

Virginia Clean Economy Act
HB1526 (2020)

Not Applicable

Electricity

Virginia Clean Economy Act
HB1526 (2020)

Not Applicable

Electricity

Virginia Clean Economy Act
HB1526 (2020)

Not Applicable

Electricity

Virginia Clean Economy Act
HB1526 (2020)

Not Applicable

Electricity

Virginia Clean Economy Act
HB1526 (2020)

Not Applicable

Buildings

Update energy codes to the most recent energy efficiency standards

Significant Progress

HB1260 (2019) updates the minimum energy code for the construction of new buildings, increasing energy efficiency and reducing emissions from wasted energy.

Buildings

Update energy codes to the most recent energy efficiency standards

Significant Progress

HB1260 (2019) updates the minimum energy code for the construction of new buildings, increasing energy efficiency and reducing emissions from wasted energy.

Buildings

Update energy codes to the most recent energy efficiency standards

Significant Progress

HB1260 (2019) updates the minimum energy code for the construction of new buildings, increasing energy efficiency and reducing emissions from wasted energy.

Buildings

Update energy codes to the most recent energy efficiency standards

Significant Progress

HB1260 (2019) updates the minimum energy code for the construction of new buildings, increasing energy efficiency and reducing emissions from wasted energy.

Buildings

Update energy codes to the most recent energy efficiency standards

Significant Progress

HB1260 (2019) updates the minimum energy code for the construction of new buildings, increasing energy efficiency and reducing emissions from wasted energy.

Buildings

Update energy codes to the most recent energy efficiency standards

Significant Progress

HB1260 (2019) updates the minimum energy code for the construction of new buildings, increasing energy efficiency and reducing emissions from wasted energy.

Buildings

Update energy codes to the most recent energy efficiency standards

Significant Progress

HB1260 (2019) updates the minimum energy code for the construction of new buildings, increasing energy efficiency and reducing emissions from wasted energy.

Buildings

Update energy codes to the most recent energy efficiency standards

Significant Progress

HB1260 (2019) updates the minimum energy code for the construction of new buildings, increasing energy efficiency and reducing emissions from wasted energy.

Buildings

Update energy codes to the most recent energy efficiency standards

Significant Progress

HB1260 (2019) updates the minimum energy code for the construction of new buildings, increasing energy efficiency and reducing emissions from wasted energy.

Buildings

Decarbonize buildings by enacting building energy performance standards

Little or No Progress

- At the local level, Boulder has had a building performance standard for rentals since 2010/
- At the state level, a bill was pending in the Colorado legislature in 2020 (Source) that sought to establish energy benchmarking and performance standards statewide, but with COVID-19, this was expected to push to 2021.

Buildings

Decarbonize buildings by enacting building energy performance standards

Little or No Progress

- At the local level, Boulder has had a building performance standard for rentals since 2010/
- At the state level, a bill was pending in the Colorado legislature in 2020 (Source) that sought to establish energy benchmarking and performance standards statewide, but with COVID-19, this was expected to push to 2021.

Buildings

Decarbonize buildings by enacting building energy performance standards

Little or No Progress

- At the local level, Boulder has had a building performance standard for rentals since 2010/
- At the state level, a bill was pending in the Colorado legislature in 2020 (Source) that sought to establish energy benchmarking and performance standards statewide, but with COVID-19, this was expected to push to 2021.

Buildings

Decarbonize buildings by enacting building energy performance standards

Little or No Progress

- At the local level, Boulder has had a building performance standard for rentals since 2010/
- At the state level, a bill was pending in the Colorado legislature in 2020 (Source) that sought to establish energy benchmarking and performance standards statewide, but with COVID-19, this was expected to push to 2021.

Buildings

Decarbonize buildings by enacting building energy performance standards

Little or No Progress

- At the local level, Boulder has had a building performance standard for rentals since 2010/
- At the state level, a bill was pending in the Colorado legislature in 2020 (Source) that sought to establish energy benchmarking and performance standards statewide, but with COVID-19, this was expected to push to 2021.

Buildings

Decarbonize buildings by enacting building energy performance standards

Little or No Progress

- At the local level, Boulder has had a building performance standard for rentals since 2010/
- At the state level, a bill was pending in the Colorado legislature in 2020 (Source) that sought to establish energy benchmarking and performance standards statewide, but with COVID-19, this was expected to push to 2021.

Buildings

Decarbonize buildings by enacting building energy performance standards

Little or No Progress

- At the local level, Boulder has had a building performance standard for rentals since 2010/
- At the state level, a bill was pending in the Colorado legislature in 2020 (Source) that sought to establish energy benchmarking and performance standards statewide, but with COVID-19, this was expected to push to 2021.

Buildings

Decarbonize buildings by enacting building energy performance standards

Little or No Progress

- At the local level, Boulder has had a building performance standard for rentals since 2010/
- At the state level, a bill was pending in the Colorado legislature in 2020 (Source) that sought to establish energy benchmarking and performance standards statewide, but with COVID-19, this was expected to push to 2021.

Buildings

Decarbonize buildings by enacting building energy performance standards

Little or No Progress

- At the local level, Boulder has had a building performance standard for rentals since 2010/
- At the state level, a bill was pending in the Colorado legislature in 2020 (Source) that sought to establish energy benchmarking and performance standards statewide, but with COVID-19, this was expected to push to 2021.

Buildings

Empower local governments to set stronger codes by adopting stretch codes

Little or No Progress

Colorado is a home-rule state and has not adopted a stretch code.

Buildings

Empower local governments to set stronger codes by adopting stretch codes

Little or No Progress

Colorado is a home-rule state and has not adopted a stretch code.

Buildings

Empower local governments to set stronger codes by adopting stretch codes

Little or No Progress

Colorado is a home-rule state and has not adopted a stretch code.

Buildings

Empower local governments to set stronger codes by adopting stretch codes

Little or No Progress

Colorado is a home-rule state and has not adopted a stretch code.

Buildings

Empower local governments to set stronger codes by adopting stretch codes

Little or No Progress

Colorado is a home-rule state and has not adopted a stretch code.

Buildings

Empower local governments to set stronger codes by adopting stretch codes

Little or No Progress

Colorado is a home-rule state and has not adopted a stretch code.

Buildings

Empower local governments to set stronger codes by adopting stretch codes

Little or No Progress

Colorado is a home-rule state and has not adopted a stretch code.

Buildings

Empower local governments to set stronger codes by adopting stretch codes

Little or No Progress

Colorado is a home-rule state and has not adopted a stretch code.

Buildings

Empower local governments to set stronger codes by adopting stretch codes

Little or No Progress

Colorado is a home-rule state and has not adopted a stretch code.

Buildings

- HB1149 (2009) initially created the requirements for solar prewire.
- HB1155 (2020) updated the language for solar prewire and added requirements for electric vehicle charging (albeit only for single-family homes). However, this bill still lets the consumer opt-in, which will slow progress.

Buildings

- HB1149 (2009) initially created the requirements for solar prewire.
- HB1155 (2020) updated the language for solar prewire and added requirements for electric vehicle charging (albeit only for single-family homes). However, this bill still lets the consumer opt-in, which will slow progress.

Buildings

- HB1149 (2009) initially created the requirements for solar prewire.
- HB1155 (2020) updated the language for solar prewire and added requirements for electric vehicle charging (albeit only for single-family homes). However, this bill still lets the consumer opt-in, which will slow progress.

Buildings

- HB1149 (2009) initially created the requirements for solar prewire.
- HB1155 (2020) updated the language for solar prewire and added requirements for electric vehicle charging (albeit only for single-family homes). However, this bill still lets the consumer opt-in, which will slow progress.

Buildings

- HB1149 (2009) initially created the requirements for solar prewire.
- HB1155 (2020) updated the language for solar prewire and added requirements for electric vehicle charging (albeit only for single-family homes). However, this bill still lets the consumer opt-in, which will slow progress.

Buildings

- HB1149 (2009) initially created the requirements for solar prewire.
- HB1155 (2020) updated the language for solar prewire and added requirements for electric vehicle charging (albeit only for single-family homes). However, this bill still lets the consumer opt-in, which will slow progress.

Buildings

- HB1149 (2009) initially created the requirements for solar prewire.
- HB1155 (2020) updated the language for solar prewire and added requirements for electric vehicle charging (albeit only for single-family homes). However, this bill still lets the consumer opt-in, which will slow progress.

Buildings

- HB1149 (2009) initially created the requirements for solar prewire.
- HB1155 (2020) updated the language for solar prewire and added requirements for electric vehicle charging (albeit only for single-family homes). However, this bill still lets the consumer opt-in, which will slow progress.

Buildings

- HB1149 (2009) initially created the requirements for solar prewire.
- HB1155 (2020) updated the language for solar prewire and added requirements for electric vehicle charging (albeit only for single-family homes). However, this bill still lets the consumer opt-in, which will slow progress.

Buildings

Save money and reduce energy waste through Energy Efficiency Resource Standards (EERS)

Some Progress

- HB1037 (2007) amended Colorado statutes C.R.S. 40-1-102 and 40-3.2-101-105 by requiring the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (COPUC) to establish energy savings goals for investor-owned electric and gas utilities.
- HB1227 (2017) extends electric efficiency programs to 2028 and requires the commission to set goals of at least 5% peak demand reduction and 5% energy savings by 2028 for demand-side management programs implemented during 2019 through 2028 when compared to a 2018 baseline.

Buildings

Save money and reduce energy waste through Energy Efficiency Resource Standards (EERS)

Some Progress

- HB1037 (2007) amended Colorado statutes C.R.S. 40-1-102 and 40-3.2-101-105 by requiring the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (COPUC) to establish energy savings goals for investor-owned electric and gas utilities.
- HB1227 (2017) extends electric efficiency programs to 2028 and requires the commission to set goals of at least 5% peak demand reduction and 5% energy savings by 2028 for demand-side management programs implemented during 2019 through 2028 when compared to a 2018 baseline.

Buildings

Save money and reduce energy waste through Energy Efficiency Resource Standards (EERS)

Some Progress

- HB1037 (2007) amended Colorado statutes C.R.S. 40-1-102 and 40-3.2-101-105 by requiring the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (COPUC) to establish energy savings goals for investor-owned electric and gas utilities.
- HB1227 (2017) extends electric efficiency programs to 2028 and requires the commission to set goals of at least 5% peak demand reduction and 5% energy savings by 2028 for demand-side management programs implemented during 2019 through 2028 when compared to a 2018 baseline.

Buildings

Save money and reduce energy waste through Energy Efficiency Resource Standards (EERS)

Some Progress

- HB1037 (2007) amended Colorado statutes C.R.S. 40-1-102 and 40-3.2-101-105 by requiring the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (COPUC) to establish energy savings goals for investor-owned electric and gas utilities.
- HB1227 (2017) extends electric efficiency programs to 2028 and requires the commission to set goals of at least 5% peak demand reduction and 5% energy savings by 2028 for demand-side management programs implemented during 2019 through 2028 when compared to a 2018 baseline.

Buildings

Save money and reduce energy waste through Energy Efficiency Resource Standards (EERS)

Some Progress

- HB1037 (2007) amended Colorado statutes C.R.S. 40-1-102 and 40-3.2-101-105 by requiring the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (COPUC) to establish energy savings goals for investor-owned electric and gas utilities.
- HB1227 (2017) extends electric efficiency programs to 2028 and requires the commission to set goals of at least 5% peak demand reduction and 5% energy savings by 2028 for demand-side management programs implemented during 2019 through 2028 when compared to a 2018 baseline.

Buildings

Save money and reduce energy waste through Energy Efficiency Resource Standards (EERS)

Some Progress

- HB1037 (2007) amended Colorado statutes C.R.S. 40-1-102 and 40-3.2-101-105 by requiring the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (COPUC) to establish energy savings goals for investor-owned electric and gas utilities.
- HB1227 (2017) extends electric efficiency programs to 2028 and requires the commission to set goals of at least 5% peak demand reduction and 5% energy savings by 2028 for demand-side management programs implemented during 2019 through 2028 when compared to a 2018 baseline.

Buildings

Save money and reduce energy waste through Energy Efficiency Resource Standards (EERS)

Some Progress

- HB1037 (2007) amended Colorado statutes C.R.S. 40-1-102 and 40-3.2-101-105 by requiring the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (COPUC) to establish energy savings goals for investor-owned electric and gas utilities.
- HB1227 (2017) extends electric efficiency programs to 2028 and requires the commission to set goals of at least 5% peak demand reduction and 5% energy savings by 2028 for demand-side management programs implemented during 2019 through 2028 when compared to a 2018 baseline.

Buildings

Save money and reduce energy waste through Energy Efficiency Resource Standards (EERS)

Some Progress

- HB1037 (2007) amended Colorado statutes C.R.S. 40-1-102 and 40-3.2-101-105 by requiring the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (COPUC) to establish energy savings goals for investor-owned electric and gas utilities.
- HB1227 (2017) extends electric efficiency programs to 2028 and requires the commission to set goals of at least 5% peak demand reduction and 5% energy savings by 2028 for demand-side management programs implemented during 2019 through 2028 when compared to a 2018 baseline.

Buildings

Save money and reduce energy waste through Energy Efficiency Resource Standards (EERS)

Some Progress

- HB1037 (2007) amended Colorado statutes C.R.S. 40-1-102 and 40-3.2-101-105 by requiring the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (COPUC) to establish energy savings goals for investor-owned electric and gas utilities.
- HB1227 (2017) extends electric efficiency programs to 2028 and requires the commission to set goals of at least 5% peak demand reduction and 5% energy savings by 2028 for demand-side management programs implemented during 2019 through 2028 when compared to a 2018 baseline.

Buildings

Enact and update appliance efficiency standards

Significant Progress

HB1231 (2019) sets new energy and water efficiency standards for household appliances, reducing waste energy and associated greenhouse gas emissions.

Buildings

Enact and update appliance efficiency standards

Significant Progress

HB1231 (2019) sets new energy and water efficiency standards for household appliances, reducing waste energy and associated greenhouse gas emissions.

Buildings

Enact and update appliance efficiency standards

Significant Progress

HB1231 (2019) sets new energy and water efficiency standards for household appliances, reducing waste energy and associated greenhouse gas emissions.

Buildings

Enact and update appliance efficiency standards

Significant Progress

HB1231 (2019) sets new energy and water efficiency standards for household appliances, reducing waste energy and associated greenhouse gas emissions.

Buildings

Enact and update appliance efficiency standards

Significant Progress

HB1231 (2019) sets new energy and water efficiency standards for household appliances, reducing waste energy and associated greenhouse gas emissions.

Buildings

Enact and update appliance efficiency standards

Significant Progress

HB1231 (2019) sets new energy and water efficiency standards for household appliances, reducing waste energy and associated greenhouse gas emissions.

Buildings

Enact and update appliance efficiency standards

Significant Progress

HB1231 (2019) sets new energy and water efficiency standards for household appliances, reducing waste energy and associated greenhouse gas emissions.

Buildings

Enact and update appliance efficiency standards

Significant Progress

HB1231 (2019) sets new energy and water efficiency standards for household appliances, reducing waste energy and associated greenhouse gas emissions.

Buildings

Enact and update appliance efficiency standards

Significant Progress

HB1231 (2019) sets new energy and water efficiency standards for household appliances, reducing waste energy and associated greenhouse gas emissions.

Buildings

Provide financial incentives to encourage clean energy and energy efficiency

Some Progress

- Colorado has tax incentives for Residential Renewable Energy (Colorado Revised Statutes § 39-1-102 and 39-3-102) & Community Solar Gardens (C.R.S. § 39-3-118.7), plus the ability for county/municipal Local Renewable Energy Incentives and Rebates (C.R.S. §§ 30-11-107.3 and 31-20-101.3).
- HB1219 (2015) creates an enterprise zone investment tax credit refund for renewable energy projects, incentivizing investments in renewable energy projects built in Colorado.
- HB1332 (2016) updates and streamlines an existing clean vehicle tax credit, makes it easier for buyers to understand the benefits of purchasing clean vehicles.
- HB1159 (2019) extends electric vehicle tax credits to 2025, which will help Coloradans save money on fuel, boost the clean energy economy, and clean up the air.

Buildings

Provide financial incentives to encourage clean energy and energy efficiency

Some Progress

- Colorado has tax incentives for Residential Renewable Energy (Colorado Revised Statutes § 39-1-102 and 39-3-102) & Community Solar Gardens (C.R.S. § 39-3-118.7), plus the ability for county/municipal Local Renewable Energy Incentives and Rebates (C.R.S. §§ 30-11-107.3 and 31-20-101.3).
- HB1219 (2015) creates an enterprise zone investment tax credit refund for renewable energy projects, incentivizing investments in renewable energy projects built in Colorado.
- HB1332 (2016) updates and streamlines an existing clean vehicle tax credit, makes it easier for buyers to understand the benefits of purchasing clean vehicles.
- HB1159 (2019) extends electric vehicle tax credits to 2025, which will help Coloradans save money on fuel, boost the clean energy economy, and clean up the air.

Buildings

Provide financial incentives to encourage clean energy and energy efficiency

Some Progress

- Colorado has tax incentives for Residential Renewable Energy (Colorado Revised Statutes § 39-1-102 and 39-3-102) & Community Solar Gardens (C.R.S. § 39-3-118.7), plus the ability for county/municipal Local Renewable Energy Incentives and Rebates (C.R.S. §§ 30-11-107.3 and 31-20-101.3).
- HB1219 (2015) creates an enterprise zone investment tax credit refund for renewable energy projects, incentivizing investments in renewable energy projects built in Colorado.
- HB1332 (2016) updates and streamlines an existing clean vehicle tax credit, makes it easier for buyers to understand the benefits of purchasing clean vehicles.
- HB1159 (2019) extends electric vehicle tax credits to 2025, which will help Coloradans save money on fuel, boost the clean energy economy, and clean up the air.

Buildings

Provide financial incentives to encourage clean energy and energy efficiency

Some Progress

- Colorado has tax incentives for Residential Renewable Energy (Colorado Revised Statutes § 39-1-102 and 39-3-102) & Community Solar Gardens (C.R.S. § 39-3-118.7), plus the ability for county/municipal Local Renewable Energy Incentives and Rebates (C.R.S. §§ 30-11-107.3 and 31-20-101.3).
- HB1219 (2015) creates an enterprise zone investment tax credit refund for renewable energy projects, incentivizing investments in renewable energy projects built in Colorado.
- HB1332 (2016) updates and streamlines an existing clean vehicle tax credit, makes it easier for buyers to understand the benefits of purchasing clean vehicles.
- HB1159 (2019) extends electric vehicle tax credits to 2025, which will help Coloradans save money on fuel, boost the clean energy economy, and clean up the air.

Buildings

Provide financial incentives to encourage clean energy and energy efficiency

Some Progress

- Colorado has tax incentives for Residential Renewable Energy (Colorado Revised Statutes § 39-1-102 and 39-3-102) & Community Solar Gardens (C.R.S. § 39-3-118.7), plus the ability for county/municipal Local Renewable Energy Incentives and Rebates (C.R.S. §§ 30-11-107.3 and 31-20-101.3).
- HB1219 (2015) creates an enterprise zone investment tax credit refund for renewable energy projects, incentivizing investments in renewable energy projects built in Colorado.
- HB1332 (2016) updates and streamlines an existing clean vehicle tax credit, makes it easier for buyers to understand the benefits of purchasing clean vehicles.
- HB1159 (2019) extends electric vehicle tax credits to 2025, which will help Coloradans save money on fuel, boost the clean energy economy, and clean up the air.

Buildings

Provide financial incentives to encourage clean energy and energy efficiency

Some Progress

- Colorado has tax incentives for Residential Renewable Energy (Colorado Revised Statutes § 39-1-102 and 39-3-102) & Community Solar Gardens (C.R.S. § 39-3-118.7), plus the ability for county/municipal Local Renewable Energy Incentives and Rebates (C.R.S. §§ 30-11-107.3 and 31-20-101.3).
- HB1219 (2015) creates an enterprise zone investment tax credit refund for renewable energy projects, incentivizing investments in renewable energy projects built in Colorado.
- HB1332 (2016) updates and streamlines an existing clean vehicle tax credit, makes it easier for buyers to understand the benefits of purchasing clean vehicles.
- HB1159 (2019) extends electric vehicle tax credits to 2025, which will help Coloradans save money on fuel, boost the clean energy economy, and clean up the air.

Buildings

Provide financial incentives to encourage clean energy and energy efficiency

Some Progress

- Colorado has tax incentives for Residential Renewable Energy (Colorado Revised Statutes § 39-1-102 and 39-3-102) & Community Solar Gardens (C.R.S. § 39-3-118.7), plus the ability for county/municipal Local Renewable Energy Incentives and Rebates (C.R.S. §§ 30-11-107.3 and 31-20-101.3).
- HB1219 (2015) creates an enterprise zone investment tax credit refund for renewable energy projects, incentivizing investments in renewable energy projects built in Colorado.
- HB1332 (2016) updates and streamlines an existing clean vehicle tax credit, makes it easier for buyers to understand the benefits of purchasing clean vehicles.
- HB1159 (2019) extends electric vehicle tax credits to 2025, which will help Coloradans save money on fuel, boost the clean energy economy, and clean up the air.

Buildings

Provide financial incentives to encourage clean energy and energy efficiency

Some Progress

- Colorado has tax incentives for Residential Renewable Energy (Colorado Revised Statutes § 39-1-102 and 39-3-102) & Community Solar Gardens (C.R.S. § 39-3-118.7), plus the ability for county/municipal Local Renewable Energy Incentives and Rebates (C.R.S. §§ 30-11-107.3 and 31-20-101.3).
- HB1219 (2015) creates an enterprise zone investment tax credit refund for renewable energy projects, incentivizing investments in renewable energy projects built in Colorado.
- HB1332 (2016) updates and streamlines an existing clean vehicle tax credit, makes it easier for buyers to understand the benefits of purchasing clean vehicles.
- HB1159 (2019) extends electric vehicle tax credits to 2025, which will help Coloradans save money on fuel, boost the clean energy economy, and clean up the air.

Buildings

Provide financial incentives to encourage clean energy and energy efficiency

Some Progress

- Colorado has tax incentives for Residential Renewable Energy (Colorado Revised Statutes § 39-1-102 and 39-3-102) & Community Solar Gardens (C.R.S. § 39-3-118.7), plus the ability for county/municipal Local Renewable Energy Incentives and Rebates (C.R.S. §§ 30-11-107.3 and 31-20-101.3).
- HB1219 (2015) creates an enterprise zone investment tax credit refund for renewable energy projects, incentivizing investments in renewable energy projects built in Colorado.
- HB1332 (2016) updates and streamlines an existing clean vehicle tax credit, makes it easier for buyers to understand the benefits of purchasing clean vehicles.
- HB1159 (2019) extends electric vehicle tax credits to 2025, which will help Coloradans save money on fuel, boost the clean energy economy, and clean up the air.

Buildings

Adopt benchmarking and transparency requirements

Little or No Progress

Colorado does not have anything in place for benchmarking or disclosure (transparency).

Buildings

Adopt benchmarking and transparency requirements

Little or No Progress

Colorado does not have anything in place for benchmarking or disclosure (transparency).

Buildings

Adopt benchmarking and transparency requirements

Little or No Progress

Colorado does not have anything in place for benchmarking or disclosure (transparency).

Buildings

Adopt benchmarking and transparency requirements

Little or No Progress

Colorado does not have anything in place for benchmarking or disclosure (transparency).

Buildings

Adopt benchmarking and transparency requirements

Little or No Progress

Colorado does not have anything in place for benchmarking or disclosure (transparency).

Buildings

Adopt benchmarking and transparency requirements

Little or No Progress

Colorado does not have anything in place for benchmarking or disclosure (transparency).

Buildings

Adopt benchmarking and transparency requirements

Little or No Progress

Colorado does not have anything in place for benchmarking or disclosure (transparency).

Buildings

Adopt benchmarking and transparency requirements

Little or No Progress

Colorado does not have anything in place for benchmarking or disclosure (transparency).

Buildings

Adopt benchmarking and transparency requirements

Little or No Progress

Colorado does not have anything in place for benchmarking or disclosure (transparency).

Buildings

Promote and enable Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs)

Significant Progress

- Colorado is noted for having a strong program coordinated by the Colorado Energy Office.

Buildings

Promote and enable Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs)

Significant Progress

- Colorado is noted for having a strong program coordinated by the Colorado Energy Office.

Buildings

Promote and enable Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs)

Significant Progress

- Colorado is noted for having a strong program coordinated by the Colorado Energy Office.

Buildings

Promote and enable Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs)

Significant Progress

- Colorado is noted for having a strong program coordinated by the Colorado Energy Office.

Buildings

Promote and enable Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs)

Significant Progress

- Colorado is noted for having a strong program coordinated by the Colorado Energy Office.

Buildings

Promote and enable Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs)

Significant Progress

- Colorado is noted for having a strong program coordinated by the Colorado Energy Office.

Buildings

Promote and enable Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs)

Significant Progress

- Colorado is noted for having a strong program coordinated by the Colorado Energy Office.

Buildings

Promote and enable Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs)

Significant Progress

- Colorado is noted for having a strong program coordinated by the Colorado Energy Office.

Buildings

Promote and enable Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs)

Significant Progress

- Colorado is noted for having a strong program coordinated by the Colorado Energy Office.

Buildings

- Active statewide commercial PACE program (CO C-PACE). Colorado PACE financing offers property owners a new tool to finance energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy projects. PACE financing is available in counties and municipalities throughout the state. Source.
- The Colorado C-PACE program is an initiative of the New Energy Improvement District (NEID) which was authorized by The Colorado General Assembly’s passage of the New Energy Jobs Creation Act of 2010 (HB1328 (2010)), as amended by the New Energy Jobs Act of 2013 (SB212 (2013)) and SB171, enacted in 2014. These statutory provisions are codified at C.R.S. 32-20-101 et seq. (collectively, the “C-PACE Statute”).

Buildings

- Active statewide commercial PACE program (CO C-PACE). Colorado PACE financing offers property owners a new tool to finance energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy projects. PACE financing is available in counties and municipalities throughout the state. Source.
- The Colorado C-PACE program is an initiative of the New Energy Improvement District (NEID) which was authorized by The Colorado General Assembly’s passage of the New Energy Jobs Creation Act of 2010 (HB1328 (2010)), as amended by the New Energy Jobs Act of 2013 (SB212 (2013)) and SB171, enacted in 2014. These statutory provisions are codified at C.R.S. 32-20-101 et seq. (collectively, the “C-PACE Statute”).

Buildings

- Active statewide commercial PACE program (CO C-PACE). Colorado PACE financing offers property owners a new tool to finance energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy projects. PACE financing is available in counties and municipalities throughout the state. Source.
- The Colorado C-PACE program is an initiative of the New Energy Improvement District (NEID) which was authorized by The Colorado General Assembly’s passage of the New Energy Jobs Creation Act of 2010 (HB1328 (2010)), as amended by the New Energy Jobs Act of 2013 (SB212 (2013)) and SB171, enacted in 2014. These statutory provisions are codified at C.R.S. 32-20-101 et seq. (collectively, the “C-PACE Statute”).

Buildings

- Active statewide commercial PACE program (CO C-PACE). Colorado PACE financing offers property owners a new tool to finance energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy projects. PACE financing is available in counties and municipalities throughout the state. Source.
- The Colorado C-PACE program is an initiative of the New Energy Improvement District (NEID) which was authorized by The Colorado General Assembly’s passage of the New Energy Jobs Creation Act of 2010 (HB1328 (2010)), as amended by the New Energy Jobs Act of 2013 (SB212 (2013)) and SB171, enacted in 2014. These statutory provisions are codified at C.R.S. 32-20-101 et seq. (collectively, the “C-PACE Statute”).

Buildings

- Active statewide commercial PACE program (CO C-PACE). Colorado PACE financing offers property owners a new tool to finance energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy projects. PACE financing is available in counties and municipalities throughout the state. Source.
- The Colorado C-PACE program is an initiative of the New Energy Improvement District (NEID) which was authorized by The Colorado General Assembly’s passage of the New Energy Jobs Creation Act of 2010 (HB1328 (2010)), as amended by the New Energy Jobs Act of 2013 (SB212 (2013)) and SB171, enacted in 2014. These statutory provisions are codified at C.R.S. 32-20-101 et seq. (collectively, the “C-PACE Statute”).

Buildings

- Active statewide commercial PACE program (CO C-PACE). Colorado PACE financing offers property owners a new tool to finance energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy projects. PACE financing is available in counties and municipalities throughout the state. Source.
- The Colorado C-PACE program is an initiative of the New Energy Improvement District (NEID) which was authorized by The Colorado General Assembly’s passage of the New Energy Jobs Creation Act of 2010 (HB1328 (2010)), as amended by the New Energy Jobs Act of 2013 (SB212 (2013)) and SB171, enacted in 2014. These statutory provisions are codified at C.R.S. 32-20-101 et seq. (collectively, the “C-PACE Statute”).

Buildings

- Active statewide commercial PACE program (CO C-PACE). Colorado PACE financing offers property owners a new tool to finance energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy projects. PACE financing is available in counties and municipalities throughout the state. Source.
- The Colorado C-PACE program is an initiative of the New Energy Improvement District (NEID) which was authorized by The Colorado General Assembly’s passage of the New Energy Jobs Creation Act of 2010 (HB1328 (2010)), as amended by the New Energy Jobs Act of 2013 (SB212 (2013)) and SB171, enacted in 2014. These statutory provisions are codified at C.R.S. 32-20-101 et seq. (collectively, the “C-PACE Statute”).

Buildings

- Active statewide commercial PACE program (CO C-PACE). Colorado PACE financing offers property owners a new tool to finance energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy projects. PACE financing is available in counties and municipalities throughout the state. Source.
- The Colorado C-PACE program is an initiative of the New Energy Improvement District (NEID) which was authorized by The Colorado General Assembly’s passage of the New Energy Jobs Creation Act of 2010 (HB1328 (2010)), as amended by the New Energy Jobs Act of 2013 (SB212 (2013)) and SB171, enacted in 2014. These statutory provisions are codified at C.R.S. 32-20-101 et seq. (collectively, the “C-PACE Statute”).

Buildings

- Active statewide commercial PACE program (CO C-PACE). Colorado PACE financing offers property owners a new tool to finance energy efficiency, water conservation, and renewable energy projects. PACE financing is available in counties and municipalities throughout the state. Source.
- The Colorado C-PACE program is an initiative of the New Energy Improvement District (NEID) which was authorized by The Colorado General Assembly’s passage of the New Energy Jobs Creation Act of 2010 (HB1328 (2010)), as amended by the New Energy Jobs Act of 2013 (SB212 (2013)) and SB171, enacted in 2014. These statutory provisions are codified at C.R.S. 32-20-101 et seq. (collectively, the “C-PACE Statute”).

Buildings

Establish a statewide Revolving Loan Fund (RLF)

Little or No Progress

- Colorado has a brownfields revolving loan fund available for the clean-up of environmentally contaminated commercial sites, but does not have an RLF for clean energy investment.

Buildings

Establish a statewide Revolving Loan Fund (RLF)

Little or No Progress

- Colorado has a brownfields revolving loan fund available for the clean-up of environmentally contaminated commercial sites, but does not have an RLF for clean energy investment.

Buildings

Establish a statewide Revolving Loan Fund (RLF)

Little or No Progress

- Colorado has a brownfields revolving loan fund available for the clean-up of environmentally contaminated commercial sites, but does not have an RLF for clean energy investment.

Buildings

Establish a statewide Revolving Loan Fund (RLF)

Little or No Progress

- Colorado has a brownfields revolving loan fund available for the clean-up of environmentally contaminated commercial sites, but does not have an RLF for clean energy investment.

Buildings

Establish a statewide Revolving Loan Fund (RLF)

Little or No Progress

- Colorado has a brownfields revolving loan fund available for the clean-up of environmentally contaminated commercial sites, but does not have an RLF for clean energy investment.

Buildings

Establish a statewide Revolving Loan Fund (RLF)

Little or No Progress

- Colorado has a brownfields revolving loan fund available for the clean-up of environmentally contaminated commercial sites, but does not have an RLF for clean energy investment.

Buildings

Establish a statewide Revolving Loan Fund (RLF)

Little or No Progress

- Colorado has a brownfields revolving loan fund available for the clean-up of environmentally contaminated commercial sites, but does not have an RLF for clean energy investment.

Buildings

Establish a statewide Revolving Loan Fund (RLF)

Little or No Progress

- Colorado has a brownfields revolving loan fund available for the clean-up of environmentally contaminated commercial sites, but does not have an RLF for clean energy investment.

Buildings

Establish a statewide Revolving Loan Fund (RLF)

Little or No Progress

- Colorado has a brownfields revolving loan fund available for the clean-up of environmentally contaminated commercial sites, but does not have an RLF for clean energy investment.

Buildings

Establish or expand statewide or local Green Banks or Clean Energy Funds (CEFs)

Some Progress

Colorado Clean Energy Fund (CCEF) was launched in 2018 as a collaboration among the Colorado Energy Office (CEO), the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Coalition for Green Capital (CGC). Executive branch initiative in response to Colorado Climate Action Plan (HB1261 (2019)).

Buildings

Establish or expand statewide or local Green Banks or Clean Energy Funds (CEFs)

Some Progress

Colorado Clean Energy Fund (CCEF) was launched in 2018 as a collaboration among the Colorado Energy Office (CEO), the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Coalition for Green Capital (CGC). Executive branch initiative in response to Colorado Climate Action Plan (HB1261 (2019)).

Buildings

Establish or expand statewide or local Green Banks or Clean Energy Funds (CEFs)

Some Progress

Colorado Clean Energy Fund (CCEF) was launched in 2018 as a collaboration among the Colorado Energy Office (CEO), the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Coalition for Green Capital (CGC). Executive branch initiative in response to Colorado Climate Action Plan (HB1261 (2019)).

Buildings

Establish or expand statewide or local Green Banks or Clean Energy Funds (CEFs)

Some Progress

Colorado Clean Energy Fund (CCEF) was launched in 2018 as a collaboration among the Colorado Energy Office (CEO), the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Coalition for Green Capital (CGC). Executive branch initiative in response to Colorado Climate Action Plan (HB1261 (2019)).

Buildings

Establish or expand statewide or local Green Banks or Clean Energy Funds (CEFs)

Some Progress

Colorado Clean Energy Fund (CCEF) was launched in 2018 as a collaboration among the Colorado Energy Office (CEO), the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Coalition for Green Capital (CGC). Executive branch initiative in response to Colorado Climate Action Plan (HB1261 (2019)).

Buildings

Establish or expand statewide or local Green Banks or Clean Energy Funds (CEFs)

Some Progress

Colorado Clean Energy Fund (CCEF) was launched in 2018 as a collaboration among the Colorado Energy Office (CEO), the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Coalition for Green Capital (CGC). Executive branch initiative in response to Colorado Climate Action Plan (HB1261 (2019)).

Buildings

Establish or expand statewide or local Green Banks or Clean Energy Funds (CEFs)

Some Progress

Colorado Clean Energy Fund (CCEF) was launched in 2018 as a collaboration among the Colorado Energy Office (CEO), the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Coalition for Green Capital (CGC). Executive branch initiative in response to Colorado Climate Action Plan (HB1261 (2019)).

Buildings

Establish or expand statewide or local Green Banks or Clean Energy Funds (CEFs)

Some Progress

Colorado Clean Energy Fund (CCEF) was launched in 2018 as a collaboration among the Colorado Energy Office (CEO), the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Coalition for Green Capital (CGC). Executive branch initiative in response to Colorado Climate Action Plan (HB1261 (2019)).

Buildings

Establish or expand statewide or local Green Banks or Clean Energy Funds (CEFs)

Some Progress

Colorado Clean Energy Fund (CCEF) was launched in 2018 as a collaboration among the Colorado Energy Office (CEO), the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Coalition for Green Capital (CGC). Executive branch initiative in response to Colorado Climate Action Plan (HB1261 (2019)).

Buildings

Prioritize low-income energy efficiency, upgrades, and protections

Little or No Progress

HB1116 (2017) extends funding for the Low-income Energy Assistance Program, which has saved low-income Coloradans over $140 million since 2006 through energy efficiency and clean energy upgrades. However, Colorado hasn't followed the example of other states in requiring utilities to prioritize upgrades for low-income customers, including % benchmarks.

Buildings

Prioritize low-income energy efficiency, upgrades, and protections

Little or No Progress

HB1116 (2017) extends funding for the Low-income Energy Assistance Program, which has saved low-income Coloradans over $140 million since 2006 through energy efficiency and clean energy upgrades. However, Colorado hasn't followed the example of other states in requiring utilities to prioritize upgrades for low-income customers, including % benchmarks.

Buildings

Prioritize low-income energy efficiency, upgrades, and protections

Little or No Progress

HB1116 (2017) extends funding for the Low-income Energy Assistance Program, which has saved low-income Coloradans over $140 million since 2006 through energy efficiency and clean energy upgrades. However, Colorado hasn't followed the example of other states in requiring utilities to prioritize upgrades for low-income customers, including % benchmarks.

Buildings

Prioritize low-income energy efficiency, upgrades, and protections

Little or No Progress

HB1116 (2017) extends funding for the Low-income Energy Assistance Program, which has saved low-income Coloradans over $140 million since 2006 through energy efficiency and clean energy upgrades. However, Colorado hasn't followed the example of other states in requiring utilities to prioritize upgrades for low-income customers, including % benchmarks.

Buildings

Prioritize low-income energy efficiency, upgrades, and protections

Little or No Progress

HB1116 (2017) extends funding for the Low-income Energy Assistance Program, which has saved low-income Coloradans over $140 million since 2006 through energy efficiency and clean energy upgrades. However, Colorado hasn't followed the example of other states in requiring utilities to prioritize upgrades for low-income customers, including % benchmarks.

Buildings

Prioritize low-income energy efficiency, upgrades, and protections

Little or No Progress

HB1116 (2017) extends funding for the Low-income Energy Assistance Program, which has saved low-income Coloradans over $140 million since 2006 through energy efficiency and clean energy upgrades. However, Colorado hasn't followed the example of other states in requiring utilities to prioritize upgrades for low-income customers, including % benchmarks.

Buildings

Prioritize low-income energy efficiency, upgrades, and protections

Little or No Progress

HB1116 (2017) extends funding for the Low-income Energy Assistance Program, which has saved low-income Coloradans over $140 million since 2006 through energy efficiency and clean energy upgrades. However, Colorado hasn't followed the example of other states in requiring utilities to prioritize upgrades for low-income customers, including % benchmarks.

Buildings

Prioritize low-income energy efficiency, upgrades, and protections

Little or No Progress

HB1116 (2017) extends funding for the Low-income Energy Assistance Program, which has saved low-income Coloradans over $140 million since 2006 through energy efficiency and clean energy upgrades. However, Colorado hasn't followed the example of other states in requiring utilities to prioritize upgrades for low-income customers, including % benchmarks.

Buildings

Prioritize low-income energy efficiency, upgrades, and protections

Little or No Progress

HB1116 (2017) extends funding for the Low-income Energy Assistance Program, which has saved low-income Coloradans over $140 million since 2006 through energy efficiency and clean energy upgrades. However, Colorado hasn't followed the example of other states in requiring utilities to prioritize upgrades for low-income customers, including % benchmarks.

Buildings

Washington Clean Buildings Act
HB1257 (2019)

Not Applicable

Buildings

Washington Clean Buildings Act
HB1257 (2019)

Not Applicable

Buildings

Washington Clean Buildings Act
HB1257 (2019)

Not Applicable

Buildings

Washington Clean Buildings Act
HB1257 (2019)

Not Applicable

Buildings

Washington Clean Buildings Act
HB1257 (2019)

Not Applicable

Buildings

Washington Clean Buildings Act
HB1257 (2019)

Not Applicable

Buildings

Washington Clean Buildings Act
HB1257 (2019)

Not Applicable

Buildings

Washington Clean Buildings Act
HB1257 (2019)

Not Applicable

Buildings

Washington Clean Buildings Act
HB1257 (2019)

Not Applicable

Transportation

Adopt the Advanced Clean Car Low-Emission Vehicle (LEV) standards & Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) regulations

Significant Progress

Colorado has adopted both California’s Low-Emission Vehicle (LEV) criteria pollutant and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission regulations and Zero-Emission Vehicle (ZEV) regulations, beginning with model year 2022 and 2023 respectively.

Transportation

Adopt the Advanced Clean Car Low-Emission Vehicle (LEV) standards & Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) regulations

Significant Progress

Colorado has adopted both California’s Low-Emission Vehicle (LEV) criteria pollutant and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission regulations and Zero-Emission Vehicle (ZEV) regulations, beginning with model year 2022 and 2023 respectively.

Transportation

Adopt the Advanced Clean Car Low-Emission Vehicle (LEV) standards & Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) regulations

Significant Progress

Colorado has adopted both California’s Low-Emission Vehicle (LEV) criteria pollutant and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission regulations and Zero-Emission Vehicle (ZEV) regulations, beginning with model year 2022 and 2023 respectively.

Transportation

Adopt the Advanced Clean Car Low-Emission Vehicle (LEV) standards & Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) regulations

Significant Progress

Colorado has adopted both California’s Low-Emission Vehicle (LEV) criteria pollutant and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission regulations and Zero-Emission Vehicle (ZEV) regulations, beginning with model year 2022 and 2023 respectively.

Transportation

Adopt the Advanced Clean Car Low-Emission Vehicle (LEV) standards & Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) regulations

Significant Progress

Colorado has adopted both California’s Low-Emission Vehicle (LEV) criteria pollutant and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission regulations and Zero-Emission Vehicle (ZEV) regulations, beginning with model year 2022 and 2023 respectively.

Transportation

Adopt the Advanced Clean Car Low-Emission Vehicle (LEV) standards & Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) regulations

Significant Progress

Colorado has adopted both California’s Low-Emission Vehicle (LEV) criteria pollutant and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission regulations and Zero-Emission Vehicle (ZEV) regulations, beginning with model year 2022 and 2023 respectively.

Transportation

Adopt the Advanced Clean Car Low-Emission Vehicle (LEV) standards & Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) regulations

Significant Progress

Colorado has adopted both California’s Low-Emission Vehicle (LEV) criteria pollutant and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission regulations and Zero-Emission Vehicle (ZEV) regulations, beginning with model year 2022 and 2023 respectively.

Transportation

Adopt the Advanced Clean Car Low-Emission Vehicle (LEV) standards & Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) regulations

Significant Progress

Colorado has adopted both California’s Low-Emission Vehicle (LEV) criteria pollutant and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission regulations and Zero-Emission Vehicle (ZEV) regulations, beginning with model year 2022 and 2023 respectively.

Transportation

Adopt the Advanced Clean Car Low-Emission Vehicle (LEV) standards & Zero Emission Vehicle (ZEV) regulations

Significant Progress

Colorado has adopted both California’s Low-Emission Vehicle (LEV) criteria pollutant and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission regulations and Zero-Emission Vehicle (ZEV) regulations, beginning with model year 2022 and 2023 respectively.

Transportation

Encourage the Governor to join the Transportation Climate Initiative (TCI) {Northeast states only}

Not Applicable

Transportation

Encourage the Governor to join the Transportation Climate Initiative (TCI) {Northeast states only}

Not Applicable

Transportation

Encourage the Governor to join the Transportation Climate Initiative (TCI) {Northeast states only}

Not Applicable

Transportation

Encourage the Governor to join the Transportation Climate Initiative (TCI) {Northeast states only}

Not Applicable

Transportation

Encourage the Governor to join the Transportation Climate Initiative (TCI) {Northeast states only}

Not Applicable

Transportation

Encourage the Governor to join the Transportation Climate Initiative (TCI) {Northeast states only}

Not Applicable

Transportation

Encourage the Governor to join the Transportation Climate Initiative (TCI) {Northeast states only}

Not Applicable

Transportation

Encourage the Governor to join the Transportation Climate Initiative (TCI) {Northeast states only}

Not Applicable

Transportation

Encourage the Governor to join the Transportation Climate Initiative (TCI) {Northeast states only}

Not Applicable

Transportation

Ensure utilities invest in electric vehicle infrastructure by requiring utility Transportation Electrification Plans

Significant Progress

- Under SB077 (2019) "Black Hills Energy and Xcel Energy are required to submit regular three-year Transportation Electrification Plans (TEPs) detailing planned investments in transportation electrification efforts by offering EV-specific rates, rebates, programs and pilots. These plans are filed with and approved by the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (PUC)." Source.
- Black Hills Electric and Xcel Energy submitted their first TEP to the PUC in mid-May 2020. The Xcel Energy plan was approved in January 2021 and received a positive review from NRDC. They noted that "a minimum of 15% of all funding will be dedicated to low-income customers and underserved communities... [and] the plan importantly includes a $5 million 'Equity Rebate' program to provide upfront rebates for eligible low-income customers purchasing new or used EVs."

Transportation

Ensure utilities invest in electric vehicle infrastructure by requiring utility Transportation Electrification Plans

Significant Progress

- Under SB077 (2019) "Black Hills Energy and Xcel Energy are required to submit regular three-year Transportation Electrification Plans (TEPs) detailing planned investments in transportation electrification efforts by offering EV-specific rates, rebates, programs and pilots. These plans are filed with and approved by the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (PUC)." Source.
- Black Hills Electric and Xcel Energy submitted their first TEP to the PUC in mid-May 2020. The Xcel Energy plan was approved in January 2021 and received a positive review from NRDC. They noted that "a minimum of 15% of all funding will be dedicated to low-income customers and underserved communities... [and] the plan importantly includes a $5 million 'Equity Rebate' program to provide upfront rebates for eligible low-income customers purchasing new or used EVs."

Transportation

Ensure utilities invest in electric vehicle infrastructure by requiring utility Transportation Electrification Plans

Significant Progress

- Under SB077 (2019) "Black Hills Energy and Xcel Energy are required to submit regular three-year Transportation Electrification Plans (TEPs) detailing planned investments in transportation electrification efforts by offering EV-specific rates, rebates, programs and pilots. These plans are filed with and approved by the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (PUC)." Source.
- Black Hills Electric and Xcel Energy submitted their first TEP to the PUC in mid-May 2020. The Xcel Energy plan was approved in January 2021 and received a positive review from NRDC. They noted that "a minimum of 15% of all funding will be dedicated to low-income customers and underserved communities... [and] the plan importantly includes a $5 million 'Equity Rebate' program to provide upfront rebates for eligible low-income customers purchasing new or used EVs."

Transportation

Ensure utilities invest in electric vehicle infrastructure by requiring utility Transportation Electrification Plans

Significant Progress

- Under SB077 (2019) "Black Hills Energy and Xcel Energy are required to submit regular three-year Transportation Electrification Plans (TEPs) detailing planned investments in transportation electrification efforts by offering EV-specific rates, rebates, programs and pilots. These plans are filed with and approved by the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (PUC)." Source.
- Black Hills Electric and Xcel Energy submitted their first TEP to the PUC in mid-May 2020. The Xcel Energy plan was approved in January 2021 and received a positive review from NRDC. They noted that "a minimum of 15% of all funding will be dedicated to low-income customers and underserved communities... [and] the plan importantly includes a $5 million 'Equity Rebate' program to provide upfront rebates for eligible low-income customers purchasing new or used EVs."

Transportation

Ensure utilities invest in electric vehicle infrastructure by requiring utility Transportation Electrification Plans

Significant Progress

- Under SB077 (2019) "Black Hills Energy and Xcel Energy are required to submit regular three-year Transportation Electrification Plans (TEPs) detailing planned investments in transportation electrification efforts by offering EV-specific rates, rebates, programs and pilots. These plans are filed with and approved by the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (PUC)." Source.
- Black Hills Electric and Xcel Energy submitted their first TEP to the PUC in mid-May 2020. The Xcel Energy plan was approved in January 2021 and received a positive review from NRDC. They noted that "a minimum of 15% of all funding will be dedicated to low-income customers and underserved communities... [and] the plan importantly includes a $5 million 'Equity Rebate' program to provide upfront rebates for eligible low-income customers purchasing new or used EVs."

Transportation

Ensure utilities invest in electric vehicle infrastructure by requiring utility Transportation Electrification Plans

Significant Progress

- Under SB077 (2019) "Black Hills Energy and Xcel Energy are required to submit regular three-year Transportation Electrification Plans (TEPs) detailing planned investments in transportation electrification efforts by offering EV-specific rates, rebates, programs and pilots. These plans are filed with and approved by the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (PUC)." Source.
- Black Hills Electric and Xcel Energy submitted their first TEP to the PUC in mid-May 2020. The Xcel Energy plan was approved in January 2021 and received a positive review from NRDC. They noted that "a minimum of 15% of all funding will be dedicated to low-income customers and underserved communities... [and] the plan importantly includes a $5 million 'Equity Rebate' program to provide upfront rebates for eligible low-income customers purchasing new or used EVs."

Transportation

Ensure utilities invest in electric vehicle infrastructure by requiring utility Transportation Electrification Plans

Significant Progress

- Under SB077 (2019) "Black Hills Energy and Xcel Energy are required to submit regular three-year Transportation Electrification Plans (TEPs) detailing planned investments in transportation electrification efforts by offering EV-specific rates, rebates, programs and pilots. These plans are filed with and approved by the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (PUC)." Source.
- Black Hills Electric and Xcel Energy submitted their first TEP to the PUC in mid-May 2020. The Xcel Energy plan was approved in January 2021 and received a positive review from NRDC. They noted that "a minimum of 15% of all funding will be dedicated to low-income customers and underserved communities... [and] the plan importantly includes a $5 million 'Equity Rebate' program to provide upfront rebates for eligible low-income customers purchasing new or used EVs."

Transportation

Ensure utilities invest in electric vehicle infrastructure by requiring utility Transportation Electrification Plans

Significant Progress

- Under SB077 (2019) "Black Hills Energy and Xcel Energy are required to submit regular three-year Transportation Electrification Plans (TEPs) detailing planned investments in transportation electrification efforts by offering EV-specific rates, rebates, programs and pilots. These plans are filed with and approved by the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (PUC)." Source.
- Black Hills Electric and Xcel Energy submitted their first TEP to the PUC in mid-May 2020. The Xcel Energy plan was approved in January 2021 and received a positive review from NRDC. They noted that "a minimum of 15% of all funding will be dedicated to low-income customers and underserved communities... [and] the plan importantly includes a $5 million 'Equity Rebate' program to provide upfront rebates for eligible low-income customers purchasing new or used EVs."

Transportation

Ensure utilities invest in electric vehicle infrastructure by requiring utility Transportation Electrification Plans

Significant Progress

- Under SB077 (2019) "Black Hills Energy and Xcel Energy are required to submit regular three-year Transportation Electrification Plans (TEPs) detailing planned investments in transportation electrification efforts by offering EV-specific rates, rebates, programs and pilots. These plans are filed with and approved by the Colorado Public Utilities Commission (PUC)." Source.
- Black Hills Electric and Xcel Energy submitted their first TEP to the PUC in mid-May 2020. The Xcel Energy plan was approved in January 2021 and received a positive review from NRDC. They noted that "a minimum of 15% of all funding will be dedicated to low-income customers and underserved communities... [and] the plan importantly includes a $5 million 'Equity Rebate' program to provide upfront rebates for eligible low-income customers purchasing new or used EVs."

Transportation

Encourage the Governor to join regional efforts in medium- and heavy-duty vehicle electrification

Significant Progress

Governor Polis signed the Multi-State Medium- and Heavy-Duty Zero Emission Vehicle MOU in June 2020.

Transportation

Encourage the Governor to join regional efforts in medium- and heavy-duty vehicle electrification

Significant Progress

Governor Polis signed the Multi-State Medium- and Heavy-Duty Zero Emission Vehicle MOU in June 2020.

Transportation

Encourage the Governor to join regional efforts in medium- and heavy-duty vehicle electrification

Significant Progress

Governor Polis signed the Multi-State Medium- and Heavy-Duty Zero Emission Vehicle MOU in June 2020.

Transportation

Encourage the Governor to join regional efforts in medium- and heavy-duty vehicle electrification

Significant Progress

Governor Polis signed the Multi-State Medium- and Heavy-Duty Zero Emission Vehicle MOU in June 2020.

Transportation

Encourage the Governor to join regional efforts in medium- and heavy-duty vehicle electrification

Significant Progress

Governor Polis signed the Multi-State Medium- and Heavy-Duty Zero Emission Vehicle MOU in June 2020.

Transportation

Encourage the Governor to join regional efforts in medium- and heavy-duty vehicle electrification

Significant Progress

Governor Polis signed the Multi-State Medium- and Heavy-Duty Zero Emission Vehicle MOU in June 2020.

Transportation

Encourage the Governor to join regional efforts in medium- and heavy-duty vehicle electrification

Significant Progress

Governor Polis signed the Multi-State Medium- and Heavy-Duty Zero Emission Vehicle MOU in June 2020.

Transportation

Encourage the Governor to join regional efforts in medium- and heavy-duty vehicle electrification

Significant Progress

Governor Polis signed the Multi-State Medium- and Heavy-Duty Zero Emission Vehicle MOU in June 2020.

Transportation

Encourage the Governor to join regional efforts in medium- and heavy-duty vehicle electrification

Significant Progress

Governor Polis signed the Multi-State Medium- and Heavy-Duty Zero Emission Vehicle MOU in June 2020.

Transportation

Leverage government's purchasing power by enacting Green State Fleets

Significant Progress

- As outlined in the 2018 and 2020 Colorado Electric Vehicle Plan and Governor Polis' 2019 update to the Greening of State Government Executive Order, Colorado is committed to the state government leading by example on the issue by setting targets for electrifying the state fleet.
- As of January 2017, the national NAFA Fleet Management Association accredits Colorado State Fleet Management as a Sustainable Fleet.

Transportation

Leverage government's purchasing power by enacting Green State Fleets

Significant Progress

- As outlined in the 2018 and 2020 Colorado Electric Vehicle Plan and Governor Polis' 2019 update to the Greening of State Government Executive Order, Colorado is committed to the state government leading by example on the issue by setting targets for electrifying the state fleet.
- As of January 2017, the national NAFA Fleet Management Association accredits Colorado State Fleet Management as a Sustainable Fleet.

Transportation

Leverage government's purchasing power by enacting Green State Fleets

Significant Progress

- As outlined in the 2018 and 2020 Colorado Electric Vehicle Plan and Governor Polis' 2019 update to the Greening of State Government Executive Order, Colorado is committed to the state government leading by example on the issue by setting targets for electrifying the state fleet.
- As of January 2017, the national NAFA Fleet Management Association accredits Colorado State Fleet Management as a Sustainable Fleet.

Transportation

Leverage government's purchasing power by enacting Green State Fleets

Significant Progress

- As outlined in the 2018 and 2020 Colorado Electric Vehicle Plan and Governor Polis' 2019 update to the Greening of State Government Executive Order, Colorado is committed to the state government leading by example on the issue by setting targets for electrifying the state fleet.
- As of January 2017, the national NAFA Fleet Management Association accredits Colorado State Fleet Management as a Sustainable Fleet.

Transportation

Leverage government's purchasing power by enacting Green State Fleets

Significant Progress

- As outlined in the 2018 and 2020 Colorado Electric Vehicle Plan and Governor Polis' 2019 update to the Greening of State Government Executive Order, Colorado is committed to the state government leading by example on the issue by setting targets for electrifying the state fleet.
- As of January 2017, the national NAFA Fleet Management Association accredits Colorado State Fleet Management as a Sustainable Fleet.

Transportation

Leverage government's purchasing power by enacting Green State Fleets

Significant Progress

- As outlined in the 2018 and 2020 Colorado Electric Vehicle Plan and Governor Polis' 2019 update to the Greening of State Government Executive Order, Colorado is committed to the state government leading by example on the issue by setting targets for electrifying the state fleet.
- As of January 2017, the national NAFA Fleet Management Association accredits Colorado State Fleet Management as a Sustainable Fleet.

Transportation

Leverage government's purchasing power by enacting Green State Fleets

Significant Progress

- As outlined in the 2018 and 2020 Colorado Electric Vehicle Plan and Governor Polis' 2019 update to the Greening of State Government Executive Order, Colorado is committed to the state government leading by example on the issue by setting targets for electrifying the state fleet.
- As of January 2017, the national NAFA Fleet Management Association accredits Colorado State Fleet Management as a Sustainable Fleet.

Transportation

Leverage government's purchasing power by enacting Green State Fleets

Significant Progress

- As outlined in the 2018 and 2020 Colorado Electric Vehicle Plan and Governor Polis' 2019 update to the Greening of State Government Executive Order, Colorado is committed to the state government leading by example on the issue by setting targets for electrifying the state fleet.
- As of January 2017, the national NAFA Fleet Management Association accredits Colorado State Fleet Management as a Sustainable Fleet.

Transportation

Leverage government's purchasing power by enacting Green State Fleets

Significant Progress

- As outlined in the 2018 and 2020 Colorado Electric Vehicle Plan and Governor Polis' 2019 update to the Greening of State Government Executive Order, Colorado is committed to the state government leading by example on the issue by setting targets for electrifying the state fleet.
- As of January 2017, the national NAFA Fleet Management Association accredits Colorado State Fleet Management as a Sustainable Fleet.

Transportation

Decarbonize fuels by Low-Carbon Fuel Standards (LCFS)

Not Applicable

Transportation

Decarbonize fuels by Low-Carbon Fuel Standards (LCFS)

Not Applicable

Transportation

Decarbonize fuels by Low-Carbon Fuel Standards (LCFS)

Not Applicable

Transportation

Decarbonize fuels by Low-Carbon Fuel Standards (LCFS)

Not Applicable

Transportation

Decarbonize fuels by Low-Carbon Fuel Standards (LCFS)

Not Applicable

Transportation

Decarbonize fuels by Low-Carbon Fuel Standards (LCFS)

Not Applicable

Transportation

Decarbonize fuels by Low-Carbon Fuel Standards (LCFS)

Not Applicable

Transportation

Decarbonize fuels by Low-Carbon Fuel Standards (LCFS)

Not Applicable

Transportation

Decarbonize fuels by Low-Carbon Fuel Standards (LCFS)

Not Applicable

Transportation

Remove legal barriers to charging stations

Little or No Progress

Colorado has not removed legal barriers to charging stations by adopting public utility exemptions.

Transportation

Remove legal barriers to charging stations

Little or No Progress

Colorado has not removed legal barriers to charging stations by adopting public utility exemptions.

Transportation

Remove legal barriers to charging stations

Little or No Progress

Colorado has not removed legal barriers to charging stations by adopting public utility exemptions.

Transportation

Remove legal barriers to charging stations

Little or No Progress

Colorado has not removed legal barriers to charging stations by adopting public utility exemptions.

Transportation

Remove legal barriers to charging stations

Little or No Progress

Colorado has not removed legal barriers to charging stations by adopting public utility exemptions.

Transportation

Remove legal barriers to charging stations

Little or No Progress

Colorado has not removed legal barriers to charging stations by adopting public utility exemptions.

Transportation

Remove legal barriers to charging stations

Little or No Progress

Colorado has not removed legal barriers to charging stations by adopting public utility exemptions.

Transportation

Remove legal barriers to charging stations

Little or No Progress

Colorado has not removed legal barriers to charging stations by adopting public utility exemptions.

Transportation

Remove legal barriers to charging stations

Little or No Progress

Colorado has not removed legal barriers to charging stations by adopting public utility exemptions.

Transportation

Provide financial incentives to encourage electric vehicle (EV) adoption

Significant Progress

Colorado Rev. Stat. §39-22-516.7 and §39-22-516.8 allows for a tax credit up to $16,000 for purchase or conversion ($8,000 for lease) of an electric or fuel cell heavy-duty truck and $4,000 for purchase or conversion ($2,000 for lease) of a light-duty EV or PHEV. The credit declines over time and expires after January 1, 2026.

Transportation

Provide financial incentives to encourage electric vehicle (EV) adoption

Significant Progress

Colorado Rev. Stat. §39-22-516.7 and §39-22-516.8 allows for a tax credit up to $16,000 for purchase or conversion ($8,000 for lease) of an electric or fuel cell heavy-duty truck and $4,000 for purchase or conversion ($2,000 for lease) of a light-duty EV or PHEV. The credit declines over time and expires after January 1, 2026.

Transportation

Provide financial incentives to encourage electric vehicle (EV) adoption

Significant Progress

Colorado Rev. Stat. §39-22-516.7 and §39-22-516.8 allows for a tax credit up to $16,000 for purchase or conversion ($8,000 for lease) of an electric or fuel cell heavy-duty truck and $4,000 for purchase or conversion ($2,000 for lease) of a light-duty EV or PHEV. The credit declines over time and expires after January 1, 2026.

Transportation

Provide financial incentives to encourage electric vehicle (EV) adoption

Significant Progress

Colorado Rev. Stat. §39-22-516.7 and §39-22-516.8 allows for a tax credit up to $16,000 for purchase or conversion ($8,000 for lease) of an electric or fuel cell heavy-duty truck and $4,000 for purchase or conversion ($2,000 for lease) of a light-duty EV or PHEV. The credit declines over time and expires after January 1, 2026.

Transportation

Provide financial incentives to encourage electric vehicle (EV) adoption

Significant Progress

Colorado Rev. Stat. §39-22-516.7 and §39-22-516.8 allows for a tax credit up to $16,000 for purchase or conversion ($8,000 for lease) of an electric or fuel cell heavy-duty truck and $4,000 for purchase or conversion ($2,000 for lease) of a light-duty EV or PHEV. The credit declines over time and expires after January 1, 2026.

Transportation

Provide financial incentives to encourage electric vehicle (EV) adoption

Significant Progress

Colorado Rev. Stat. §39-22-516.7 and §39-22-516.8 allows for a tax credit up to $16,000 for purchase or conversion ($8,000 for lease) of an electric or fuel cell heavy-duty truck and $4,000 for purchase or conversion ($2,000 for lease) of a light-duty EV or PHEV. The credit declines over time and expires after January 1, 2026.

Transportation

Provide financial incentives to encourage electric vehicle (EV) adoption

Significant Progress

Colorado Rev. Stat. §39-22-516.7 and §39-22-516.8 allows for a tax credit up to $16,000 for purchase or conversion ($8,000 for lease) of an electric or fuel cell heavy-duty truck and $4,000 for purchase or conversion ($2,000 for lease) of a light-duty EV or PHEV. The credit declines over time and expires after January 1, 2026.

Transportation

Provide financial incentives to encourage electric vehicle (EV) adoption

Significant Progress

Colorado Rev. Stat. §39-22-516.7 and §39-22-516.8 allows for a tax credit up to $16,000 for purchase or conversion ($8,000 for lease) of an electric or fuel cell heavy-duty truck and $4,000 for purchase or conversion ($2,000 for lease) of a light-duty EV or PHEV. The credit declines over time and expires after January 1, 2026.

Transportation

Provide financial incentives to encourage electric vehicle (EV) adoption

Significant Progress

Colorado Rev. Stat. §39-22-516.7 and §39-22-516.8 allows for a tax credit up to $16,000 for purchase or conversion ($8,000 for lease) of an electric or fuel cell heavy-duty truck and $4,000 for purchase or conversion ($2,000 for lease) of a light-duty EV or PHEV. The credit declines over time and expires after January 1, 2026.

Transportation

Expand private and public electric vehicle charging infrastructure

Some Progress

The Colorado Electric Vehicle Plan 2020 outlines the state's investments in private and public EV charging infrastructure, notably through the Charge Ahead Colorado program and the EV Corridor Fast-Charging plan, for which the Colorado Energy Office "awarded a $10.33 million grant to ChargePoint for Direct Current (DC) fast charging corridors to build EV stations across the state. The fast-charging stations will be located in communities at 33 sites across six corridors comprised of Interstate, State and US Highways."

Transportation

Expand private and public electric vehicle charging infrastructure

Some Progress

The Colorado Electric Vehicle Plan 2020 outlines the state's investments in private and public EV charging infrastructure, notably through the Charge Ahead Colorado program and the EV Corridor Fast-Charging plan, for which the Colorado Energy Office "awarded a $10.33 million grant to ChargePoint for Direct Current (DC) fast charging corridors to build EV stations across the state. The fast-charging stations will be located in communities at 33 sites across six corridors comprised of Interstate, State and US Highways."

Transportation

Expand private and public electric vehicle charging infrastructure

Some Progress

The Colorado Electric Vehicle Plan 2020 outlines the state's investments in private and public EV charging infrastructure, notably through the Charge Ahead Colorado program and the EV Corridor Fast-Charging plan, for which the Colorado Energy Office "awarded a $10.33 million grant to ChargePoint for Direct Current (DC) fast charging corridors to build EV stations across the state. The fast-charging stations will be located in communities at 33 sites across six corridors comprised of Interstate, State and US Highways."

Transportation

Expand private and public electric vehicle charging infrastructure

Some Progress

The Colorado Electric Vehicle Plan 2020 outlines the state's investments in private and public EV charging infrastructure, notably through the Charge Ahead Colorado program and the EV Corridor Fast-Charging plan, for which the Colorado Energy Office "awarded a $10.33 million grant to ChargePoint for Direct Current (DC) fast charging corridors to build EV stations across the state. The fast-charging stations will be located in communities at 33 sites across six corridors comprised of Interstate, State and US Highways."

Transportation

Expand private and public electric vehicle charging infrastructure

Some Progress

The Colorado Electric Vehicle Plan 2020 outlines the state's investments in private and public EV charging infrastructure, notably through the Charge Ahead Colorado program and the EV Corridor Fast-Charging plan, for which the Colorado Energy Office "awarded a $10.33 million grant to ChargePoint for Direct Current (DC) fast charging corridors to build EV stations across the state. The fast-charging stations will be located in communities at 33 sites across six corridors comprised of Interstate, State and US Highways."

Transportation

Expand private and public electric vehicle charging infrastructure

Some Progress

The Colorado Electric Vehicle Plan 2020 outlines the state's investments in private and public EV charging infrastructure, notably through the Charge Ahead Colorado program and the EV Corridor Fast-Charging plan, for which the Colorado Energy Office "awarded a $10.33 million grant to ChargePoint for Direct Current (DC) fast charging corridors to build EV stations across the state. The fast-charging stations will be located in communities at 33 sites across six corridors comprised of Interstate, State and US Highways."

Transportation

Expand private and public electric vehicle charging infrastructure

Some Progress

The Colorado Electric Vehicle Plan 2020 outlines the state's investments in private and public EV charging infrastructure, notably through the Charge Ahead Colorado program and the EV Corridor Fast-Charging plan, for which the Colorado Energy Office "awarded a $10.33 million grant to ChargePoint for Direct Current (DC) fast charging corridors to build EV stations across the state. The fast-charging stations will be located in communities at 33 sites across six corridors comprised of Interstate, State and US Highways."

Transportation

Expand private and public electric vehicle charging infrastructure

Some Progress

The Colorado Electric Vehicle Plan 2020 outlines the state's investments in private and public EV charging infrastructure, notably through the Charge Ahead Colorado program and the EV Corridor Fast-Charging plan, for which the Colorado Energy Office "awarded a $10.33 million grant to ChargePoint for Direct Current (DC) fast charging corridors to build EV stations across the state. The fast-charging stations will be located in communities at 33 sites across six corridors comprised of Interstate, State and US Highways."

Transportation

Expand private and public electric vehicle charging infrastructure

Some Progress

The Colorado Electric Vehicle Plan 2020 outlines the state's investments in private and public EV charging infrastructure, notably through the Charge Ahead Colorado program and the EV Corridor Fast-Charging plan, for which the Colorado Energy Office "awarded a $10.33 million grant to ChargePoint for Direct Current (DC) fast charging corridors to build EV stations across the state. The fast-charging stations will be located in communities at 33 sites across six corridors comprised of Interstate, State and US Highways."

Transportation

Expand and electrify Public Transportation

Some Progress

- Colorado has made some progress on electrifying public transportation options at the state and local level, including reallocating some of the remaining state Volkswagen diesel settlement funds to zero emission buses and shuttles including "first round grant awards totaling $13.9 million to six transit agencies for 23 battery electric buses and supporting infrastructure."
- Colorado has also outlined plans to expand local & regional and inter-city transit in the 2045 Statewide Transit Plan. As an intermediate proof point, Bustang, which began operating in 2015 and is CDOT’s interregional express bus service that connects urbanized areas across the state, has seen total ridership 6x from 2015-2019.

Transportation

Expand and electrify Public Transportation

Some Progress

- Colorado has made some progress on electrifying public transportation options at the state and local level, including reallocating some of the remaining state Volkswagen diesel settlement funds to zero emission buses and shuttles including "first round grant awards totaling $13.9 million to six transit agencies for 23 battery electric buses and supporting infrastructure."
- Colorado has also outlined plans to expand local & regional and inter-city transit in the 2045 Statewide Transit Plan. As an intermediate proof point, Bustang, which began operating in 2015 and is CDOT’s interregional express bus service that connects urbanized areas across the state, has seen total ridership 6x from 2015-2019.

Transportation

Expand and electrify Public Transportation

Some Progress

- Colorado has made some progress on electrifying public transportation options at the state and local level, including reallocating some of the remaining state Volkswagen diesel settlement funds to zero emission buses and shuttles including "first round grant awards totaling $13.9 million to six transit agencies for 23 battery electric buses and supporting infrastructure."
- Colorado has also outlined plans to expand local & regional and inter-city transit in the 2045 Statewide Transit Plan. As an intermediate proof point, Bustang, which began operating in 2015 and is CDOT’s interregional express bus service that connects urbanized areas across the state, has seen total ridership 6x from 2015-2019.

Transportation

Expand and electrify Public Transportation

Some Progress

- Colorado has made some progress on electrifying public transportation options at the state and local level, including reallocating some of the remaining state Volkswagen diesel settlement funds to zero emission buses and shuttles including "first round grant awards totaling $13.9 million to six transit agencies for 23 battery electric buses and supporting infrastructure."
- Colorado has also outlined plans to expand local & regional and inter-city transit in the 2045 Statewide Transit Plan. As an intermediate proof point, Bustang, which began operating in 2015 and is CDOT’s interregional express bus service that connects urbanized areas across the state, has seen total ridership 6x from 2015-2019.

Transportation

Expand and electrify Public Transportation

Some Progress

- Colorado has made some progress on electrifying public transportation options at the state and local level, including reallocating some of the remaining state Volkswagen diesel settlement funds to zero emission buses and shuttles including "first round grant awards totaling $13.9 million to six transit agencies for 23 battery electric buses and supporting infrastructure."
- Colorado has also outlined plans to expand local & regional and inter-city transit in the 2045 Statewide Transit Plan. As an intermediate proof point, Bustang, which began operating in 2015 and is CDOT’s interregional express bus service that connects urbanized areas across the state, has seen total ridership 6x from 2015-2019.

Transportation

Expand and electrify Public Transportation

Some Progress

- Colorado has made some progress on electrifying public transportation options at the state and local level, including reallocating some of the remaining state Volkswagen diesel settlement funds to zero emission buses and shuttles including "first round grant awards totaling $13.9 million to six transit agencies for 23 battery electric buses and supporting infrastructure."
- Colorado has also outlined plans to expand local & regional and inter-city transit in the 2045 Statewide Transit Plan. As an intermediate proof point, Bustang, which began operating in 2015 and is CDOT’s interregional express bus service that connects urbanized areas across the state, has seen total ridership 6x from 2015-2019.

Transportation

Expand and electrify Public Transportation

Some Progress

- Colorado has made some progress on electrifying public transportation options at the state and local level, including reallocating some of the remaining state Volkswagen diesel settlement funds to zero emission buses and shuttles including "first round grant awards totaling $13.9 million to six transit agencies for 23 battery electric buses and supporting infrastructure."
- Colorado has also outlined plans to expand local & regional and inter-city transit in the 2045 Statewide Transit Plan. As an intermediate proof point, Bustang, which began operating in 2015 and is CDOT’s interregional express bus service that connects urbanized areas across the state, has seen total ridership 6x from 2015-2019.

Transportation

Expand and electrify Public Transportation

Some Progress

- Colorado has made some progress on electrifying public transportation options at the state and local level, including reallocating some of the remaining state Volkswagen diesel settlement funds to zero emission buses and shuttles including "first round grant awards totaling $13.9 million to six transit agencies for 23 battery electric buses and supporting infrastructure."
- Colorado has also outlined plans to expand local & regional and inter-city transit in the 2045 Statewide Transit Plan. As an intermediate proof point, Bustang, which began operating in 2015 and is CDOT’s interregional express bus service that connects urbanized areas across the state, has seen total ridership 6x from 2015-2019.

Transportation

Expand and electrify Public Transportation

Some Progress

- Colorado has made some progress on electrifying public transportation options at the state and local level, including reallocating some of the remaining state Volkswagen diesel settlement funds to zero emission buses and shuttles including "first round grant awards totaling $13.9 million to six transit agencies for 23 battery electric buses and supporting infrastructure."
- Colorado has also outlined plans to expand local & regional and inter-city transit in the 2045 Statewide Transit Plan. As an intermediate proof point, Bustang, which began operating in 2015 and is CDOT’s interregional express bus service that connects urbanized areas across the state, has seen total ridership 6x from 2015-2019.

Transportation

Invest in Smart Growth and Complete Streets

Little or No Progress

- HB1147 (2010) codified the CO Department of Transportation's "complete streets policy to promote the use of alternative transportation by providing a comprehensive network of roads and streets." Source
- More recently, "the cities of Westminster, Aurora, and Arvada, Colorado collaboratively applied for and won the second ever Complete Streets Consortium Series technical assistance, an EPA-funded program designed to bring multiple jurisdictions within the same state together for a series of workshops and webinars." State departments also partcipated in the workshops, resulting in the following report of action items.

Transportation

Invest in Smart Growth and Complete Streets

Little or No Progress

- HB1147 (2010) codified the CO Department of Transportation's "complete streets policy to promote the use of alternative transportation by providing a comprehensive network of roads and streets." Source
- More recently, "the cities of Westminster, Aurora, and Arvada, Colorado collaboratively applied for and won the second ever Complete Streets Consortium Series technical assistance, an EPA-funded program designed to bring multiple jurisdictions within the same state together for a series of workshops and webinars." State departments also partcipated in the workshops, resulting in the following report of action items.

Transportation

Invest in Smart Growth and Complete Streets

Little or No Progress

- HB1147 (2010) codified the CO Department of Transportation's "complete streets policy to promote the use of alternative transportation by providing a comprehensive network of roads and streets." Source
- More recently, "the cities of Westminster, Aurora, and Arvada, Colorado collaboratively applied for and won the second ever Complete Streets Consortium Series technical assistance, an EPA-funded program designed to bring multiple jurisdictions within the same state together for a series of workshops and webinars." State departments also partcipated in the workshops, resulting in the following report of action items.

Transportation

Invest in Smart Growth and Complete Streets

Little or No Progress

- HB1147 (2010) codified the CO Department of Transportation's "complete streets policy to promote the use of alternative transportation by providing a comprehensive network of roads and streets." Source
- More recently, "the cities of Westminster, Aurora, and Arvada, Colorado collaboratively applied for and won the second ever Complete Streets Consortium Series technical assistance, an EPA-funded program designed to bring multiple jurisdictions within the same state together for a series of workshops and webinars." State departments also partcipated in the workshops, resulting in the following report of action items.

Transportation

Invest in Smart Growth and Complete Streets

Little or No Progress

- HB1147 (2010) codified the CO Department of Transportation's "complete streets policy to promote the use of alternative transportation by providing a comprehensive network of roads and streets." Source
- More recently, "the cities of Westminster, Aurora, and Arvada, Colorado collaboratively applied for and won the second ever Complete Streets Consortium Series technical assistance, an EPA-funded program designed to bring multiple jurisdictions within the same state together for a series of workshops and webinars." State departments also partcipated in the workshops, resulting in the following report of action items.

Transportation

Invest in Smart Growth and Complete Streets

Little or No Progress

- HB1147 (2010) codified the CO Department of Transportation's "complete streets policy to promote the use of alternative transportation by providing a comprehensive network of roads and streets." Source
- More recently, "the cities of Westminster, Aurora, and Arvada, Colorado collaboratively applied for and won the second ever Complete Streets Consortium Series technical assistance, an EPA-funded program designed to bring multiple jurisdictions within the same state together for a series of workshops and webinars." State departments also partcipated in the workshops, resulting in the following report of action items.

Transportation

Invest in Smart Growth and Complete Streets

Little or No Progress

- HB1147 (2010) codified the CO Department of Transportation's "complete streets policy to promote the use of alternative transportation by providing a comprehensive network of roads and streets." Source
- More recently, "the cities of Westminster, Aurora, and Arvada, Colorado collaboratively applied for and won the second ever Complete Streets Consortium Series technical assistance, an EPA-funded program designed to bring multiple jurisdictions within the same state together for a series of workshops and webinars." State departments also partcipated in the workshops, resulting in the following report of action items.

Transportation

Invest in Smart Growth and Complete Streets

Little or No Progress

- HB1147 (2010) codified the CO Department of Transportation's "complete streets policy to promote the use of alternative transportation by providing a comprehensive network of roads and streets." Source
- More recently, "the cities of Westminster, Aurora, and Arvada, Colorado collaboratively applied for and won the second ever Complete Streets Consortium Series technical assistance, an EPA-funded program designed to bring multiple jurisdictions within the same state together for a series of workshops and webinars." State departments also partcipated in the workshops, resulting in the following report of action items.

Transportation

Invest in Smart Growth and Complete Streets

Little or No Progress

- HB1147 (2010) codified the CO Department of Transportation's "complete streets policy to promote the use of alternative transportation by providing a comprehensive network of roads and streets." Source
- More recently, "the cities of Westminster, Aurora, and Arvada, Colorado collaboratively applied for and won the second ever Complete Streets Consortium Series technical assistance, an EPA-funded program designed to bring multiple jurisdictions within the same state together for a series of workshops and webinars." State departments also partcipated in the workshops, resulting in the following report of action items.

Transportation

Expand and electrify rail – for passengers and freight

Some Progress

The 2018 Colorado Freight and Passenger Rail Plan and 2045 Statewide Transportation Plan both mention expanding rail for passengers and freight but don't outline the goal of electrifying rail.

Transportation

Expand and electrify rail – for passengers and freight

Some Progress

The 2018 Colorado Freight and Passenger Rail Plan and 2045 Statewide Transportation Plan both mention expanding rail for passengers and freight but don't outline the goal of electrifying rail.

Transportation

Expand and electrify rail – for passengers and freight

Some Progress

The 2018 Colorado Freight and Passenger Rail Plan and 2045 Statewide Transportation Plan both mention expanding rail for passengers and freight but don't outline the goal of electrifying rail.

Transportation

Expand and electrify rail – for passengers and freight

Some Progress

The 2018 Colorado Freight and Passenger Rail Plan and 2045 Statewide Transportation Plan both mention expanding rail for passengers and freight but don't outline the goal of electrifying rail.

Transportation

Expand and electrify rail – for passengers and freight

Some Progress

The 2018 Colorado Freight and Passenger Rail Plan and 2045 Statewide Transportation Plan both mention expanding rail for passengers and freight but don't outline the goal of electrifying rail.

Transportation

Expand and electrify rail – for passengers and freight

Some Progress

The 2018 Colorado Freight and Passenger Rail Plan and 2045 Statewide Transportation Plan both mention expanding rail for passengers and freight but don't outline the goal of electrifying rail.

Transportation

Expand and electrify rail – for passengers and freight

Some Progress

The 2018 Colorado Freight and Passenger Rail Plan and 2045 Statewide Transportation Plan both mention expanding rail for passengers and freight but don't outline the goal of electrifying rail.

Transportation

Expand and electrify rail – for passengers and freight

Some Progress

The 2018 Colorado Freight and Passenger Rail Plan and 2045 Statewide Transportation Plan both mention expanding rail for passengers and freight but don't outline the goal of electrifying rail.

Transportation

Expand and electrify rail – for passengers and freight

Some Progress

The 2018 Colorado Freight and Passenger Rail Plan and 2045 Statewide Transportation Plan both mention expanding rail for passengers and freight but don't outline the goal of electrifying rail.

Transportation

New Jersey
S2252 (2020)
Goals and incentives for increased use of Electric Vehicles (EVs)

Not Applicable

Transportation

New Jersey
S2252 (2020)
Goals and incentives for increased use of Electric Vehicles (EVs)

Not Applicable

Transportation

New Jersey
S2252 (2020)
Goals and incentives for increased use of Electric Vehicles (EVs)

Not Applicable

Transportation

New Jersey
S2252 (2020)
Goals and incentives for increased use of Electric Vehicles (EVs)

Not Applicable

Transportation

New Jersey
S2252 (2020)
Goals and incentives for increased use of Electric Vehicles (EVs)

Not Applicable

Transportation

New Jersey
S2252 (2020)
Goals and incentives for increased use of Electric Vehicles (EVs)

Not Applicable

Transportation

New Jersey
S2252 (2020)
Goals and incentives for increased use of Electric Vehicles (EVs)

Not Applicable

Transportation

New Jersey
S2252 (2020)
Goals and incentives for increased use of Electric Vehicles (EVs)

Not Applicable

Transportation

New Jersey
S2252 (2020)
Goals and incentives for increased use of Electric Vehicles (EVs)

Not Applicable

Transportation

Washington
HB2042 (2019) & HB1512 (2019)
Transportation Decarbonization Package

Not Applicable

Transportation

Washington
HB2042 (2019) & HB1512 (2019)
Transportation Decarbonization Package

Not Applicable

Transportation

Washington
HB2042 (2019) & HB1512 (2019)
Transportation Decarbonization Package

Not Applicable

Transportation

Washington
HB2042 (2019) & HB1512 (2019)
Transportation Decarbonization Package

Not Applicable

Transportation

Washington
HB2042 (2019) & HB1512 (2019)
Transportation Decarbonization Package

Not Applicable

Transportation

Washington
HB2042 (2019) & HB1512 (2019)
Transportation Decarbonization Package

Not Applicable

Transportation

Washington
HB2042 (2019) & HB1512 (2019)
Transportation Decarbonization Package

Not Applicable

Transportation

Washington
HB2042 (2019) & HB1512 (2019)
Transportation Decarbonization Package

Not Applicable

Transportation

Washington
HB2042 (2019) & HB1512 (2019)
Transportation Decarbonization Package

Not Applicable

Agriculture & Conservation

Fight food waste through policies such as organic waste reduction goals and donation standards

Some Progress

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 39-22-536 and Colo. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 39-22-301 provide tax incentives for food donation.

Agriculture & Conservation

Fight food waste through policies such as organic waste reduction goals and donation standards

Some Progress

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 39-22-536 and Colo. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 39-22-301 provide tax incentives for food donation.

Agriculture & Conservation

Fight food waste through policies such as organic waste reduction goals and donation standards

Some Progress

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 39-22-536 and Colo. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 39-22-301 provide tax incentives for food donation.

Agriculture & Conservation

Fight food waste through policies such as organic waste reduction goals and donation standards

Some Progress

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 39-22-536 and Colo. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 39-22-301 provide tax incentives for food donation.

Agriculture & Conservation

Fight food waste through policies such as organic waste reduction goals and donation standards

Some Progress

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 39-22-536 and Colo. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 39-22-301 provide tax incentives for food donation.

Agriculture & Conservation

Fight food waste through policies such as organic waste reduction goals and donation standards

Some Progress

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 39-22-536 and Colo. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 39-22-301 provide tax incentives for food donation.

Agriculture & Conservation

Fight food waste through policies such as organic waste reduction goals and donation standards

Some Progress

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 39-22-536 and Colo. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 39-22-301 provide tax incentives for food donation.

Agriculture & Conservation

Fight food waste through policies such as organic waste reduction goals and donation standards

Some Progress

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 39-22-536 and Colo. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 39-22-301 provide tax incentives for food donation.

Agriculture & Conservation

Fight food waste through policies such as organic waste reduction goals and donation standards

Some Progress

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 39-22-536 and Colo. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 39-22-301 provide tax incentives for food donation.

Agriculture & Conservation

HB1264 (2019) improves Colorado's conservation easement program, which will support further conservation of open spaces, waterways, and wildlife habitat.

Agriculture & Conservation

HB1264 (2019) improves Colorado's conservation easement program, which will support further conservation of open spaces, waterways, and wildlife habitat.

Agriculture & Conservation

HB1264 (2019) improves Colorado's conservation easement program, which will support further conservation of open spaces, waterways, and wildlife habitat.

Agriculture & Conservation

HB1264 (2019) improves Colorado's conservation easement program, which will support further conservation of open spaces, waterways, and wildlife habitat.

Agriculture & Conservation

HB1264 (2019) improves Colorado's conservation easement program, which will support further conservation of open spaces, waterways, and wildlife habitat.

Agriculture & Conservation

HB1264 (2019) improves Colorado's conservation easement program, which will support further conservation of open spaces, waterways, and wildlife habitat.

Agriculture & Conservation

HB1264 (2019) improves Colorado's conservation easement program, which will support further conservation of open spaces, waterways, and wildlife habitat.

Agriculture & Conservation

HB1264 (2019) improves Colorado's conservation easement program, which will support further conservation of open spaces, waterways, and wildlife habitat.

Agriculture & Conservation

HB1264 (2019) improves Colorado's conservation easement program, which will support further conservation of open spaces, waterways, and wildlife habitat.

Agriculture & Conservation

Agriculture & Conservation

Agriculture & Conservation

Agriculture & Conservation

Agriculture & Conservation

Agriculture & Conservation

Agriculture & Conservation

Agriculture & Conservation

Agriculture & Conservation

Agriculture & Conservation

Support farmers practicing regenerative agriculture

Some Progress

- "The Soil Health Initiative began as a grassroots effort from the state’s Conservation Districts and was voted into action by the Colorado Association of Conservation Districts in 2018 and 2019...The Colorado Department of Agriculture (CDA) has spent more than a year engaging in a robust stakeholder process through the leadership of the Colorado Collaborative for Healthy Soils (CCHS) to gather input from agricultural groups and individual farmers and ranchers from across the state." (Source)
- HB-1181 (introduced 03/04/2021), which aims to create a voluntary soil health program, is under consideration at the time of writing.

Agriculture & Conservation

Support farmers practicing regenerative agriculture

Some Progress

- "The Soil Health Initiative began as a grassroots effort from the state’s Conservation Districts and was voted into action by the Colorado Association of Conservation Districts in 2018 and 2019...The Colorado Department of Agriculture (CDA) has spent more than a year engaging in a robust stakeholder process through the leadership of the Colorado Collaborative for Healthy Soils (CCHS) to gather input from agricultural groups and individual farmers and ranchers from across the state." (Source)
- HB-1181 (introduced 03/04/2021), which aims to create a voluntary soil health program, is under consideration at the time of writing.

Agriculture & Conservation

Support farmers practicing regenerative agriculture

Some Progress

- "The Soil Health Initiative began as a grassroots effort from the state’s Conservation Districts and was voted into action by the Colorado Association of Conservation Districts in 2018 and 2019...The Colorado Department of Agriculture (CDA) has spent more than a year engaging in a robust stakeholder process through the leadership of the Colorado Collaborative for Healthy Soils (CCHS) to gather input from agricultural groups and individual farmers and ranchers from across the state." (Source)
- HB-1181 (introduced 03/04/2021), which aims to create a voluntary soil health program, is under consideration at the time of writing.

Agriculture & Conservation

Support farmers practicing regenerative agriculture

Some Progress

- "The Soil Health Initiative began as a grassroots effort from the state’s Conservation Districts and was voted into action by the Colorado Association of Conservation Districts in 2018 and 2019...The Colorado Department of Agriculture (CDA) has spent more than a year engaging in a robust stakeholder process through the leadership of the Colorado Collaborative for Healthy Soils (CCHS) to gather input from agricultural groups and individual farmers and ranchers from across the state." (Source)
- HB-1181 (introduced 03/04/2021), which aims to create a voluntary soil health program, is under consideration at the time of writing.

Agriculture & Conservation

Support farmers practicing regenerative agriculture

Some Progress

- "The Soil Health Initiative began as a grassroots effort from the state’s Conservation Districts and was voted into action by the Colorado Association of Conservation Districts in 2018 and 2019...The Colorado Department of Agriculture (CDA) has spent more than a year engaging in a robust stakeholder process through the leadership of the Colorado Collaborative for Healthy Soils (CCHS) to gather input from agricultural groups and individual farmers and ranchers from across the state." (Source)
- HB-1181 (introduced 03/04/2021), which aims to create a voluntary soil health program, is under consideration at the time of writing.

Agriculture & Conservation

Support farmers practicing regenerative agriculture

Some Progress

- "The Soil Health Initiative began as a grassroots effort from the state’s Conservation Districts and was voted into action by the Colorado Association of Conservation Districts in 2018 and 2019...The Colorado Department of Agriculture (CDA) has spent more than a year engaging in a robust stakeholder process through the leadership of the Colorado Collaborative for Healthy Soils (CCHS) to gather input from agricultural groups and individual farmers and ranchers from across the state." (Source)
- HB-1181 (introduced 03/04/2021), which aims to create a voluntary soil health program, is under consideration at the time of writing.

Agriculture & Conservation

Support farmers practicing regenerative agriculture

Some Progress

- "The Soil Health Initiative began as a grassroots effort from the state’s Conservation Districts and was voted into action by the Colorado Association of Conservation Districts in 2018 and 2019...The Colorado Department of Agriculture (CDA) has spent more than a year engaging in a robust stakeholder process through the leadership of the Colorado Collaborative for Healthy Soils (CCHS) to gather input from agricultural groups and individual farmers and ranchers from across the state." (Source)
- HB-1181 (introduced 03/04/2021), which aims to create a voluntary soil health program, is under consideration at the time of writing.

Agriculture & Conservation

Support farmers practicing regenerative agriculture

Some Progress

- "The Soil Health Initiative began as a grassroots effort from the state’s Conservation Districts and was voted into action by the Colorado Association of Conservation Districts in 2018 and 2019...The Colorado Department of Agriculture (CDA) has spent more than a year engaging in a robust stakeholder process through the leadership of the Colorado Collaborative for Healthy Soils (CCHS) to gather input from agricultural groups and individual farmers and ranchers from across the state." (Source)
- HB-1181 (introduced 03/04/2021), which aims to create a voluntary soil health program, is under consideration at the time of writing.

Agriculture & Conservation

Support farmers practicing regenerative agriculture

Some Progress

- "The Soil Health Initiative began as a grassroots effort from the state’s Conservation Districts and was voted into action by the Colorado Association of Conservation Districts in 2018 and 2019...The Colorado Department of Agriculture (CDA) has spent more than a year engaging in a robust stakeholder process through the leadership of the Colorado Collaborative for Healthy Soils (CCHS) to gather input from agricultural groups and individual farmers and ranchers from across the state." (Source)
- HB-1181 (introduced 03/04/2021), which aims to create a voluntary soil health program, is under consideration at the time of writing.

Adaptation & Resilience

Update building codes for disaster-preparedness

Not Applicable

Adaptation & Resilience

Update building codes for disaster-preparedness

Not Applicable

Adaptation & Resilience

Update building codes for disaster-preparedness

Not Applicable

Adaptation & Resilience

Update building codes for disaster-preparedness

Not Applicable

Adaptation & Resilience

Update building codes for disaster-preparedness

Not Applicable

Adaptation & Resilience

Update building codes for disaster-preparedness

Not Applicable

Adaptation & Resilience

Update building codes for disaster-preparedness

Not Applicable

Adaptation & Resilience

Update building codes for disaster-preparedness

Not Applicable

Adaptation & Resilience

Update building codes for disaster-preparedness

Not Applicable

Adaptation & Resilience

Incorporate climate science in infrastructure planning

Some Progress

- The Colorado Resilience Framework was introduced by the governor after devastating floods in 2013 to prioritize resilience in planning.
- HB1006 (2019) "aims to mitigate the effects of wildfires within
wildland-urban interface areas, and includes funding for the forest restoration and wildfire risk mitigation grants program cash fund." (Source)

Adaptation & Resilience

Incorporate climate science in infrastructure planning

Some Progress

- The Colorado Resilience Framework was introduced by the governor after devastating floods in 2013 to prioritize resilience in planning.
- HB1006 (2019) "aims to mitigate the effects of wildfires within
wildland-urban interface areas, and includes funding for the forest restoration and wildfire risk mitigation grants program cash fund." (Source)

Adaptation & Resilience

Incorporate climate science in infrastructure planning

Some Progress

- The Colorado Resilience Framework was introduced by the governor after devastating floods in 2013 to prioritize resilience in planning.
- HB1006 (2019) "aims to mitigate the effects of wildfires within
wildland-urban interface areas, and includes funding for the forest restoration and wildfire risk mitigation grants program cash fund." (Source)

Adaptation & Resilience

Incorporate climate science in infrastructure planning

Some Progress

- The Colorado Resilience Framework was introduced by the governor after devastating floods in 2013 to prioritize resilience in planning.
- HB1006 (2019) "aims to mitigate the effects of wildfires within
wildland-urban interface areas, and includes funding for the forest restoration and wildfire risk mitigation grants program cash fund." (Source)

Adaptation & Resilience

Incorporate climate science in infrastructure planning

Some Progress

- The Colorado Resilience Framework was introduced by the governor after devastating floods in 2013 to prioritize resilience in planning.
- HB1006 (2019) "aims to mitigate the effects of wildfires within
wildland-urban interface areas, and includes funding for the forest restoration and wildfire risk mitigation grants program cash fund." (Source)

Adaptation & Resilience

Incorporate climate science in infrastructure planning

Some Progress

- The Colorado Resilience Framework was introduced by the governor after devastating floods in 2013 to prioritize resilience in planning.
- HB1006 (2019) "aims to mitigate the effects of wildfires within
wildland-urban interface areas, and includes funding for the forest restoration and wildfire risk mitigation grants program cash fund." (Source)

Adaptation & Resilience

Incorporate climate science in infrastructure planning

Some Progress

- The Colorado Resilience Framework was introduced by the governor after devastating floods in 2013 to prioritize resilience in planning.
- HB1006 (2019) "aims to mitigate the effects of wildfires within
wildland-urban interface areas, and includes funding for the forest restoration and wildfire risk mitigation grants program cash fund." (Source)

Adaptation & Resilience

Incorporate climate science in infrastructure planning

Some Progress

- The Colorado Resilience Framework was introduced by the governor after devastating floods in 2013 to prioritize resilience in planning.
- HB1006 (2019) "aims to mitigate the effects of wildfires within
wildland-urban interface areas, and includes funding for the forest restoration and wildfire risk mitigation grants program cash fund." (Source)

Adaptation & Resilience

Incorporate climate science in infrastructure planning

Some Progress

- The Colorado Resilience Framework was introduced by the governor after devastating floods in 2013 to prioritize resilience in planning.
- HB1006 (2019) "aims to mitigate the effects of wildfires within
wildland-urban interface areas, and includes funding for the forest restoration and wildfire risk mitigation grants program cash fund." (Source)

Adaptation & Resilience

Improve indoor air quality (IAQ)

Some Progress

As with most other states and DC, Colorado has a handful of statutory requirements that forbid the use of certain products (e.g. chemical air fresheners) in particular settings (e.g. schools and day-care centers) or mandate disclosure by real estate brokers of the existence of certain chemicals in a building (Source). However, this focus on IAQ has not been extended to natural gas bans or support for induction stoves to reduce GHG emissions and further improve IAQ.

Adaptation & Resilience

Improve indoor air quality (IAQ)

Some Progress

As with most other states and DC, Colorado has a handful of statutory requirements that forbid the use of certain products (e.g. chemical air fresheners) in particular settings (e.g. schools and day-care centers) or mandate disclosure by real estate brokers of the existence of certain chemicals in a building (Source). However, this focus on IAQ has not been extended to natural gas bans or support for induction stoves to reduce GHG emissions and further improve IAQ.

Adaptation & Resilience

Improve indoor air quality (IAQ)

Some Progress

As with most other states and DC, Colorado has a handful of statutory requirements that forbid the use of certain products (e.g. chemical air fresheners) in particular settings (e.g. schools and day-care centers) or mandate disclosure by real estate brokers of the existence of certain chemicals in a building (Source). However, this focus on IAQ has not been extended to natural gas bans or support for induction stoves to reduce GHG emissions and further improve IAQ.

Adaptation & Resilience

Improve indoor air quality (IAQ)

Some Progress

As with most other states and DC, Colorado has a handful of statutory requirements that forbid the use of certain products (e.g. chemical air fresheners) in particular settings (e.g. schools and day-care centers) or mandate disclosure by real estate brokers of the existence of certain chemicals in a building (Source). However, this focus on IAQ has not been extended to natural gas bans or support for induction stoves to reduce GHG emissions and further improve IAQ.

Adaptation & Resilience

Improve indoor air quality (IAQ)

Some Progress

As with most other states and DC, Colorado has a handful of statutory requirements that forbid the use of certain products (e.g. chemical air fresheners) in particular settings (e.g. schools and day-care centers) or mandate disclosure by real estate brokers of the existence of certain chemicals in a building (Source). However, this focus on IAQ has not been extended to natural gas bans or support for induction stoves to reduce GHG emissions and further improve IAQ.

Adaptation & Resilience

Improve indoor air quality (IAQ)

Some Progress

As with most other states and DC, Colorado has a handful of statutory requirements that forbid the use of certain products (e.g. chemical air fresheners) in particular settings (e.g. schools and day-care centers) or mandate disclosure by real estate brokers of the existence of certain chemicals in a building (Source). However, this focus on IAQ has not been extended to natural gas bans or support for induction stoves to reduce GHG emissions and further improve IAQ.

Adaptation & Resilience

Improve indoor air quality (IAQ)

Some Progress

As with most other states and DC, Colorado has a handful of statutory requirements that forbid the use of certain products (e.g. chemical air fresheners) in particular settings (e.g. schools and day-care centers) or mandate disclosure by real estate brokers of the existence of certain chemicals in a building (Source). However, this focus on IAQ has not been extended to natural gas bans or support for induction stoves to reduce GHG emissions and further improve IAQ.

Adaptation & Resilience

Improve indoor air quality (IAQ)

Some Progress

As with most other states and DC, Colorado has a handful of statutory requirements that forbid the use of certain products (e.g. chemical air fresheners) in particular settings (e.g. schools and day-care centers) or mandate disclosure by real estate brokers of the existence of certain chemicals in a building (Source). However, this focus on IAQ has not been extended to natural gas bans or support for induction stoves to reduce GHG emissions and further improve IAQ.

Adaptation & Resilience

Improve indoor air quality (IAQ)

Some Progress

As with most other states and DC, Colorado has a handful of statutory requirements that forbid the use of certain products (e.g. chemical air fresheners) in particular settings (e.g. schools and day-care centers) or mandate disclosure by real estate brokers of the existence of certain chemicals in a building (Source). However, this focus on IAQ has not been extended to natural gas bans or support for induction stoves to reduce GHG emissions and further improve IAQ.

Adaptation & Resilience

Promote energy security through microgrids and distributed energy generation

Some Progress

- HB1270 (2018) directed the PUC to adopt rules for the procurement of energy storage systems by investor-owned electric utilities, based on an analysis of costs and benefits as well as factors such as grid reliability and a reduction in the need for additional peak generation capacity. This contributed to the recently proposed project from Xcel Energy, which will provide 6 MW/15 MWh of microgrid capacity across seven microgrids including installations at a school, airport and other community sites (Source).
- SB009 (2018) allows Coloradans to install and use energy storage on their property without unnecessary restrictions, boosting the state’s renewable market and jobs and promoting grid resiliency.

Adaptation & Resilience

Promote energy security through microgrids and distributed energy generation

Some Progress

- HB1270 (2018) directed the PUC to adopt rules for the procurement of energy storage systems by investor-owned electric utilities, based on an analysis of costs and benefits as well as factors such as grid reliability and a reduction in the need for additional peak generation capacity. This contributed to the recently proposed project from Xcel Energy, which will provide 6 MW/15 MWh of microgrid capacity across seven microgrids including installations at a school, airport and other community sites (Source).
- SB009 (2018) allows Coloradans to install and use energy storage on their property without unnecessary restrictions, boosting the state’s renewable market and jobs and promoting grid resiliency.

Adaptation & Resilience

Promote energy security through microgrids and distributed energy generation

Some Progress

- HB1270 (2018) directed the PUC to adopt rules for the procurement of energy storage systems by investor-owned electric utilities, based on an analysis of costs and benefits as well as factors such as grid reliability and a reduction in the need for additional peak generation capacity. This contributed to the recently proposed project from Xcel Energy, which will provide 6 MW/15 MWh of microgrid capacity across seven microgrids including installations at a school, airport and other community sites (Source).
- SB009 (2018) allows Coloradans to install and use energy storage on their property without unnecessary restrictions, boosting the state’s renewable market and jobs and promoting grid resiliency.

Adaptation & Resilience

Promote energy security through microgrids and distributed energy generation

Some Progress

- HB1270 (2018) directed the PUC to adopt rules for the procurement of energy storage systems by investor-owned electric utilities, based on an analysis of costs and benefits as well as factors such as grid reliability and a reduction in the need for additional peak generation capacity. This contributed to the recently proposed project from Xcel Energy, which will provide 6 MW/15 MWh of microgrid capacity across seven microgrids including installations at a school, airport and other community sites (Source).
- SB009 (2018) allows Coloradans to install and use energy storage on their property without unnecessary restrictions, boosting the state’s renewable market and jobs and promoting grid resiliency.

Adaptation & Resilience

Promote energy security through microgrids and distributed energy generation

Some Progress

- HB1270 (2018) directed the PUC to adopt rules for the procurement of energy storage systems by investor-owned electric utilities, based on an analysis of costs and benefits as well as factors such as grid reliability and a reduction in the need for additional peak generation capacity. This contributed to the recently proposed project from Xcel Energy, which will provide 6 MW/15 MWh of microgrid capacity across seven microgrids including installations at a school, airport and other community sites (Source).
- SB009 (2018) allows Coloradans to install and use energy storage on their property without unnecessary restrictions, boosting the state’s renewable market and jobs and promoting grid resiliency.

Adaptation & Resilience

Promote energy security through microgrids and distributed energy generation

Some Progress

- HB1270 (2018) directed the PUC to adopt rules for the procurement of energy storage systems by investor-owned electric utilities, based on an analysis of costs and benefits as well as factors such as grid reliability and a reduction in the need for additional peak generation capacity. This contributed to the recently proposed project from Xcel Energy, which will provide 6 MW/15 MWh of microgrid capacity across seven microgrids including installations at a school, airport and other community sites (Source).
- SB009 (2018) allows Coloradans to install and use energy storage on their property without unnecessary restrictions, boosting the state’s renewable market and jobs and promoting grid resiliency.

Adaptation & Resilience

Promote energy security through microgrids and distributed energy generation

Some Progress

- HB1270 (2018) directed the PUC to adopt rules for the procurement of energy storage systems by investor-owned electric utilities, based on an analysis of costs and benefits as well as factors such as grid reliability and a reduction in the need for additional peak generation capacity. This contributed to the recently proposed project from Xcel Energy, which will provide 6 MW/15 MWh of microgrid capacity across seven microgrids including installations at a school, airport and other community sites (Source).
- SB009 (2018) allows Coloradans to install and use energy storage on their property without unnecessary restrictions, boosting the state’s renewable market and jobs and promoting grid resiliency.

Adaptation & Resilience

Promote energy security through microgrids and distributed energy generation

Some Progress

- HB1270 (2018) directed the PUC to adopt rules for the procurement of energy storage systems by investor-owned electric utilities, based on an analysis of costs and benefits as well as factors such as grid reliability and a reduction in the need for additional peak generation capacity. This contributed to the recently proposed project from Xcel Energy, which will provide 6 MW/15 MWh of microgrid capacity across seven microgrids including installations at a school, airport and other community sites (Source).
- SB009 (2018) allows Coloradans to install and use energy storage on their property without unnecessary restrictions, boosting the state’s renewable market and jobs and promoting grid resiliency.

Adaptation & Resilience

Promote energy security through microgrids and distributed energy generation

Some Progress

- HB1270 (2018) directed the PUC to adopt rules for the procurement of energy storage systems by investor-owned electric utilities, based on an analysis of costs and benefits as well as factors such as grid reliability and a reduction in the need for additional peak generation capacity. This contributed to the recently proposed project from Xcel Energy, which will provide 6 MW/15 MWh of microgrid capacity across seven microgrids including installations at a school, airport and other community sites (Source).
- SB009 (2018) allows Coloradans to install and use energy storage on their property without unnecessary restrictions, boosting the state’s renewable market and jobs and promoting grid resiliency.

Adaptation & Resilience

Require comprehensive tracking of natural disaster spending

Some Progress

Colorado has contributed information to organizations seeking to better understand disaster spending at the state level; however, their responses demonstrated a lack of comprehensive, standardized spending data across state agencies.

Adaptation & Resilience

Require comprehensive tracking of natural disaster spending

Some Progress

Colorado has contributed information to organizations seeking to better understand disaster spending at the state level; however, their responses demonstrated a lack of comprehensive, standardized spending data across state agencies.

Adaptation & Resilience

Require comprehensive tracking of natural disaster spending

Some Progress

Colorado has contributed information to organizations seeking to better understand disaster spending at the state level; however, their responses demonstrated a lack of comprehensive, standardized spending data across state agencies.

Adaptation & Resilience

Require comprehensive tracking of natural disaster spending

Some Progress

Colorado has contributed information to organizations seeking to better understand disaster spending at the state level; however, their responses demonstrated a lack of comprehensive, standardized spending data across state agencies.

Adaptation & Resilience

Require comprehensive tracking of natural disaster spending

Some Progress

Colorado has contributed information to organizations seeking to better understand disaster spending at the state level; however, their responses demonstrated a lack of comprehensive, standardized spending data across state agencies.

Adaptation & Resilience

Require comprehensive tracking of natural disaster spending

Some Progress

Colorado has contributed information to organizations seeking to better understand disaster spending at the state level; however, their responses demonstrated a lack of comprehensive, standardized spending data across state agencies.

Adaptation & Resilience

Require comprehensive tracking of natural disaster spending

Some Progress

Colorado has contributed information to organizations seeking to better understand disaster spending at the state level; however, their responses demonstrated a lack of comprehensive, standardized spending data across state agencies.

Adaptation & Resilience

Require comprehensive tracking of natural disaster spending

Some Progress

Colorado has contributed information to organizations seeking to better understand disaster spending at the state level; however, their responses demonstrated a lack of comprehensive, standardized spending data across state agencies.

Adaptation & Resilience

Require comprehensive tracking of natural disaster spending

Some Progress

Colorado has contributed information to organizations seeking to better understand disaster spending at the state level; however, their responses demonstrated a lack of comprehensive, standardized spending data across state agencies.

Adaptation & Resilience

Identify vulnerabilities and ensure equity in long-term planning

Some Progress

- In response to requirements dictated by HB1261 (2019), the Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment has submitted a draft Climate Equity Framework for public comment (April 2021). 31 organizations, including NRDC, submitted recommendations to the department in response to the draft framework, highlighting the need to move beyond simply improved communication to ensure equitable outcomes.
- The DPHE has also realeased a Beta Climate Equity Data Viewer in order to use data to help identify areas with disproportionate impacts and to prioritize outreach and engagement efforts.

Adaptation & Resilience

Identify vulnerabilities and ensure equity in long-term planning

Some Progress

- In response to requirements dictated by HB1261 (2019), the Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment has submitted a draft Climate Equity Framework for public comment (April 2021). 31 organizations, including NRDC, submitted recommendations to the department in response to the draft framework, highlighting the need to move beyond simply improved communication to ensure equitable outcomes.
- The DPHE has also realeased a Beta Climate Equity Data Viewer in order to use data to help identify areas with disproportionate impacts and to prioritize outreach and engagement efforts.

Adaptation & Resilience

Identify vulnerabilities and ensure equity in long-term planning

Some Progress

- In response to requirements dictated by HB1261 (2019), the Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment has submitted a draft Climate Equity Framework for public comment (April 2021). 31 organizations, including NRDC, submitted recommendations to the department in response to the draft framework, highlighting the need to move beyond simply improved communication to ensure equitable outcomes.
- The DPHE has also realeased a Beta Climate Equity Data Viewer in order to use data to help identify areas with disproportionate impacts and to prioritize outreach and engagement efforts.

Adaptation & Resilience

Identify vulnerabilities and ensure equity in long-term planning

Some Progress

- In response to requirements dictated by HB1261 (2019), the Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment has submitted a draft Climate Equity Framework for public comment (April 2021). 31 organizations, including NRDC, submitted recommendations to the department in response to the draft framework, highlighting the need to move beyond simply improved communication to ensure equitable outcomes.
- The DPHE has also realeased a Beta Climate Equity Data Viewer in order to use data to help identify areas with disproportionate impacts and to prioritize outreach and engagement efforts.

Adaptation & Resilience

Identify vulnerabilities and ensure equity in long-term planning

Some Progress

- In response to requirements dictated by HB1261 (2019), the Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment has submitted a draft Climate Equity Framework for public comment (April 2021). 31 organizations, including NRDC, submitted recommendations to the department in response to the draft framework, highlighting the need to move beyond simply improved communication to ensure equitable outcomes.
- The DPHE has also realeased a Beta Climate Equity Data Viewer in order to use data to help identify areas with disproportionate impacts and to prioritize outreach and engagement efforts.

Adaptation & Resilience

Identify vulnerabilities and ensure equity in long-term planning

Some Progress

- In response to requirements dictated by HB1261 (2019), the Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment has submitted a draft Climate Equity Framework for public comment (April 2021). 31 organizations, including NRDC, submitted recommendations to the department in response to the draft framework, highlighting the need to move beyond simply improved communication to ensure equitable outcomes.
- The DPHE has also realeased a Beta Climate Equity Data Viewer in order to use data to help identify areas with disproportionate impacts and to prioritize outreach and engagement efforts.

Adaptation & Resilience

Identify vulnerabilities and ensure equity in long-term planning

Some Progress

- In response to requirements dictated by HB1261 (2019), the Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment has submitted a draft Climate Equity Framework for public comment (April 2021). 31 organizations, including NRDC, submitted recommendations to the department in response to the draft framework, highlighting the need to move beyond simply improved communication to ensure equitable outcomes.
- The DPHE has also realeased a Beta Climate Equity Data Viewer in order to use data to help identify areas with disproportionate impacts and to prioritize outreach and engagement efforts.

Adaptation & Resilience

Identify vulnerabilities and ensure equity in long-term planning

Some Progress

- In response to requirements dictated by HB1261 (2019), the Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment has submitted a draft Climate Equity Framework for public comment (April 2021). 31 organizations, including NRDC, submitted recommendations to the department in response to the draft framework, highlighting the need to move beyond simply improved communication to ensure equitable outcomes.
- The DPHE has also realeased a Beta Climate Equity Data Viewer in order to use data to help identify areas with disproportionate impacts and to prioritize outreach and engagement efforts.

Adaptation & Resilience

Identify vulnerabilities and ensure equity in long-term planning

Some Progress

- In response to requirements dictated by HB1261 (2019), the Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment has submitted a draft Climate Equity Framework for public comment (April 2021). 31 organizations, including NRDC, submitted recommendations to the department in response to the draft framework, highlighting the need to move beyond simply improved communication to ensure equitable outcomes.
- The DPHE has also realeased a Beta Climate Equity Data Viewer in order to use data to help identify areas with disproportionate impacts and to prioritize outreach and engagement efforts.

Adaptation & Resilience

Provide resilience education to local governments

Some Progress

The Colorado Resilience Office (housed under the Department of Local Affairs) was established by Governor Hickenlooper after floods in September 2013 and "supports and helps empower Colorado communities in building stronger, safer and more resilient in the face of natural disasters and other major challenges. The CRO coordinates overarching recovery and resiliency activities by collaborating with numerous multi-disciplinary local, state, federal, and private partners in setting priorities, leveraging resources, communicating transparently and delivering measurable results to shape an adaptable and vibrant future."

Adaptation & Resilience

Provide resilience education to local governments

Some Progress

The Colorado Resilience Office (housed under the Department of Local Affairs) was established by Governor Hickenlooper after floods in September 2013 and "supports and helps empower Colorado communities in building stronger, safer and more resilient in the face of natural disasters and other major challenges. The CRO coordinates overarching recovery and resiliency activities by collaborating with numerous multi-disciplinary local, state, federal, and private partners in setting priorities, leveraging resources, communicating transparently and delivering measurable results to shape an adaptable and vibrant future."

Adaptation & Resilience

Provide resilience education to local governments

Some Progress

The Colorado Resilience Office (housed under the Department of Local Affairs) was established by Governor Hickenlooper after floods in September 2013 and "supports and helps empower Colorado communities in building stronger, safer and more resilient in the face of natural disasters and other major challenges. The CRO coordinates overarching recovery and resiliency activities by collaborating with numerous multi-disciplinary local, state, federal, and private partners in setting priorities, leveraging resources, communicating transparently and delivering measurable results to shape an adaptable and vibrant future."

Adaptation & Resilience

Provide resilience education to local governments

Some Progress

The Colorado Resilience Office (housed under the Department of Local Affairs) was established by Governor Hickenlooper after floods in September 2013 and "supports and helps empower Colorado communities in building stronger, safer and more resilient in the face of natural disasters and other major challenges. The CRO coordinates overarching recovery and resiliency activities by collaborating with numerous multi-disciplinary local, state, federal, and private partners in setting priorities, leveraging resources, communicating transparently and delivering measurable results to shape an adaptable and vibrant future."

Adaptation & Resilience

Provide resilience education to local governments

Some Progress

The Colorado Resilience Office (housed under the Department of Local Affairs) was established by Governor Hickenlooper after floods in September 2013 and "supports and helps empower Colorado communities in building stronger, safer and more resilient in the face of natural disasters and other major challenges. The CRO coordinates overarching recovery and resiliency activities by collaborating with numerous multi-disciplinary local, state, federal, and private partners in setting priorities, leveraging resources, communicating transparently and delivering measurable results to shape an adaptable and vibrant future."

Adaptation & Resilience

Provide resilience education to local governments

Some Progress

The Colorado Resilience Office (housed under the Department of Local Affairs) was established by Governor Hickenlooper after floods in September 2013 and "supports and helps empower Colorado communities in building stronger, safer and more resilient in the face of natural disasters and other major challenges. The CRO coordinates overarching recovery and resiliency activities by collaborating with numerous multi-disciplinary local, state, federal, and private partners in setting priorities, leveraging resources, communicating transparently and delivering measurable results to shape an adaptable and vibrant future."

Adaptation & Resilience

Provide resilience education to local governments

Some Progress

The Colorado Resilience Office (housed under the Department of Local Affairs) was established by Governor Hickenlooper after floods in September 2013 and "supports and helps empower Colorado communities in building stronger, safer and more resilient in the face of natural disasters and other major challenges. The CRO coordinates overarching recovery and resiliency activities by collaborating with numerous multi-disciplinary local, state, federal, and private partners in setting priorities, leveraging resources, communicating transparently and delivering measurable results to shape an adaptable and vibrant future."

Adaptation & Resilience

Provide resilience education to local governments

Some Progress

The Colorado Resilience Office (housed under the Department of Local Affairs) was established by Governor Hickenlooper after floods in September 2013 and "supports and helps empower Colorado communities in building stronger, safer and more resilient in the face of natural disasters and other major challenges. The CRO coordinates overarching recovery and resiliency activities by collaborating with numerous multi-disciplinary local, state, federal, and private partners in setting priorities, leveraging resources, communicating transparently and delivering measurable results to shape an adaptable and vibrant future."

Adaptation & Resilience

Provide resilience education to local governments

Some Progress

The Colorado Resilience Office (housed under the Department of Local Affairs) was established by Governor Hickenlooper after floods in September 2013 and "supports and helps empower Colorado communities in building stronger, safer and more resilient in the face of natural disasters and other major challenges. The CRO coordinates overarching recovery and resiliency activities by collaborating with numerous multi-disciplinary local, state, federal, and private partners in setting priorities, leveraging resources, communicating transparently and delivering measurable results to shape an adaptable and vibrant future."

Adaptation & Resilience

Fund green infrastructure projects

Some Progress

- The state legislature has passed annual bills for Water Projects Eligibility Lists (see HJR-1002 (2021)) to approve water project revolving fund eligibility lists, including projects for green infrastructure.
- Cities such as Denver and Boulder have set their own green infrastructure strategy with associated projects.

Adaptation & Resilience

Fund green infrastructure projects

Some Progress

- The state legislature has passed annual bills for Water Projects Eligibility Lists (see HJR-1002 (2021)) to approve water project revolving fund eligibility lists, including projects for green infrastructure.
- Cities such as Denver and Boulder have set their own green infrastructure strategy with associated projects.

Adaptation & Resilience

Fund green infrastructure projects

Some Progress

- The state legislature has passed annual bills for Water Projects Eligibility Lists (see HJR-1002 (2021)) to approve water project revolving fund eligibility lists, including projects for green infrastructure.
- Cities such as Denver and Boulder have set their own green infrastructure strategy with associated projects.

Adaptation & Resilience

Fund green infrastructure projects

Some Progress

- The state legislature has passed annual bills for Water Projects Eligibility Lists (see HJR-1002 (2021)) to approve water project revolving fund eligibility lists, including projects for green infrastructure.
- Cities such as Denver and Boulder have set their own green infrastructure strategy with associated projects.

Adaptation & Resilience

Fund green infrastructure projects

Some Progress

- The state legislature has passed annual bills for Water Projects Eligibility Lists (see HJR-1002 (2021)) to approve water project revolving fund eligibility lists, including projects for green infrastructure.
- Cities such as Denver and Boulder have set their own green infrastructure strategy with associated projects.

Adaptation & Resilience

Fund green infrastructure projects

Some Progress

- The state legislature has passed annual bills for Water Projects Eligibility Lists (see HJR-1002 (2021)) to approve water project revolving fund eligibility lists, including projects for green infrastructure.
- Cities such as Denver and Boulder have set their own green infrastructure strategy with associated projects.

Adaptation & Resilience

Fund green infrastructure projects

Some Progress

- The state legislature has passed annual bills for Water Projects Eligibility Lists (see HJR-1002 (2021)) to approve water project revolving fund eligibility lists, including projects for green infrastructure.
- Cities such as Denver and Boulder have set their own green infrastructure strategy with associated projects.

Adaptation & Resilience

Fund green infrastructure projects

Some Progress

- The state legislature has passed annual bills for Water Projects Eligibility Lists (see HJR-1002 (2021)) to approve water project revolving fund eligibility lists, including projects for green infrastructure.
- Cities such as Denver and Boulder have set their own green infrastructure strategy with associated projects.

Adaptation & Resilience

Fund green infrastructure projects

Some Progress

- The state legislature has passed annual bills for Water Projects Eligibility Lists (see HJR-1002 (2021)) to approve water project revolving fund eligibility lists, including projects for green infrastructure.
- Cities such as Denver and Boulder have set their own green infrastructure strategy with associated projects.

Adaptation & Resilience

Invest in conservation

Some Progress

- As with all other states and DC, Colorado first drafted a State Wildlife Action Plan (SWAP) in 2005. This must be revisited and reformulated every ten years in order to continue receiving federal State Wildlife Grants, which significantly support several conservation projects.
- HB1264 (2019) improves Colorado's conservation easement program, which will support further conservation of open spaces, waterways, and wildlife habitat.
- SB202 (2017) appropriates $1.5 million from the species conservation trust fund for programs submitted by the executive director of the Department of Natural Resources.

Adaptation & Resilience

Invest in conservation

Some Progress

- As with all other states and DC, Colorado first drafted a State Wildlife Action Plan (SWAP) in 2005. This must be revisited and reformulated every ten years in order to continue receiving federal State Wildlife Grants, which significantly support several conservation projects.
- HB1264 (2019) improves Colorado's conservation easement program, which will support further conservation of open spaces, waterways, and wildlife habitat.
- SB202 (2017) appropriates $1.5 million from the species conservation trust fund for programs submitted by the executive director of the Department of Natural Resources.

Adaptation & Resilience

Invest in conservation

Some Progress

- As with all other states and DC, Colorado first drafted a State Wildlife Action Plan (SWAP) in 2005. This must be revisited and reformulated every ten years in order to continue receiving federal State Wildlife Grants, which significantly support several conservation projects.
- HB1264 (2019) improves Colorado's conservation easement program, which will support further conservation of open spaces, waterways, and wildlife habitat.
- SB202 (2017) appropriates $1.5 million from the species conservation trust fund for programs submitted by the executive director of the Department of Natural Resources.

Adaptation & Resilience

Invest in conservation

Some Progress

- As with all other states and DC, Colorado first drafted a State Wildlife Action Plan (SWAP) in 2005. This must be revisited and reformulated every ten years in order to continue receiving federal State Wildlife Grants, which significantly support several conservation projects.
- HB1264 (2019) improves Colorado's conservation easement program, which will support further conservation of open spaces, waterways, and wildlife habitat.
- SB202 (2017) appropriates $1.5 million from the species conservation trust fund for programs submitted by the executive director of the Department of Natural Resources.

Adaptation & Resilience

Invest in conservation

Some Progress

- As with all other states and DC, Colorado first drafted a State Wildlife Action Plan (SWAP) in 2005. This must be revisited and reformulated every ten years in order to continue receiving federal State Wildlife Grants, which significantly support several conservation projects.
- HB1264 (2019) improves Colorado's conservation easement program, which will support further conservation of open spaces, waterways, and wildlife habitat.
- SB202 (2017) appropriates $1.5 million from the species conservation trust fund for programs submitted by the executive director of the Department of Natural Resources.

Adaptation & Resilience

Invest in conservation

Some Progress

- As with all other states and DC, Colorado first drafted a State Wildlife Action Plan (SWAP) in 2005. This must be revisited and reformulated every ten years in order to continue receiving federal State Wildlife Grants, which significantly support several conservation projects.
- HB1264 (2019) improves Colorado's conservation easement program, which will support further conservation of open spaces, waterways, and wildlife habitat.
- SB202 (2017) appropriates $1.5 million from the species conservation trust fund for programs submitted by the executive director of the Department of Natural Resources.

Adaptation & Resilience

Invest in conservation

Some Progress

- As with all other states and DC, Colorado first drafted a State Wildlife Action Plan (SWAP) in 2005. This must be revisited and reformulated every ten years in order to continue receiving federal State Wildlife Grants, which significantly support several conservation projects.
- HB1264 (2019) improves Colorado's conservation easement program, which will support further conservation of open spaces, waterways, and wildlife habitat.
- SB202 (2017) appropriates $1.5 million from the species conservation trust fund for programs submitted by the executive director of the Department of Natural Resources.

Adaptation & Resilience

Invest in conservation

Some Progress

- As with all other states and DC, Colorado first drafted a State Wildlife Action Plan (SWAP) in 2005. This must be revisited and reformulated every ten years in order to continue receiving federal State Wildlife Grants, which significantly support several conservation projects.
- HB1264 (2019) improves Colorado's conservation easement program, which will support further conservation of open spaces, waterways, and wildlife habitat.
- SB202 (2017) appropriates $1.5 million from the species conservation trust fund for programs submitted by the executive director of the Department of Natural Resources.

Adaptation & Resilience

Invest in conservation

Some Progress

- As with all other states and DC, Colorado first drafted a State Wildlife Action Plan (SWAP) in 2005. This must be revisited and reformulated every ten years in order to continue receiving federal State Wildlife Grants, which significantly support several conservation projects.
- HB1264 (2019) improves Colorado's conservation easement program, which will support further conservation of open spaces, waterways, and wildlife habitat.
- SB202 (2017) appropriates $1.5 million from the species conservation trust fund for programs submitted by the executive director of the Department of Natural Resources.

Adaptation & Resilience

Fund equitable relocation programs

Not Applicable

Adaptation & Resilience

Fund equitable relocation programs

Not Applicable

Adaptation & Resilience

Fund equitable relocation programs

Not Applicable

Adaptation & Resilience

Fund equitable relocation programs

Not Applicable

Adaptation & Resilience

Fund equitable relocation programs

Not Applicable

Adaptation & Resilience

Fund equitable relocation programs

Not Applicable

Adaptation & Resilience

Fund equitable relocation programs

Not Applicable

Adaptation & Resilience

Fund equitable relocation programs

Not Applicable

Adaptation & Resilience

Fund equitable relocation programs

Not Applicable

Adaptation & Resilience

Ensure equitable disaster preparation and response

Some Progress

The Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment's draft Climate Equity Framework lists 6 key principles in order to promote equity, including equitable representation in relation to climate policies. However, as previously noted, key stakeholders are concerned that the framework fails to go far enough in identifying and analyzing historical and current inequities, as well as ensuring equitable outcomes going forward.

Adaptation & Resilience

Ensure equitable disaster preparation and response

Some Progress

The Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment's draft Climate Equity Framework lists 6 key principles in order to promote equity, including equitable representation in relation to climate policies. However, as previously noted, key stakeholders are concerned that the framework fails to go far enough in identifying and analyzing historical and current inequities, as well as ensuring equitable outcomes going forward.

Adaptation & Resilience

Ensure equitable disaster preparation and response

Some Progress

The Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment's draft Climate Equity Framework lists 6 key principles in order to promote equity, including equitable representation in relation to climate policies. However, as previously noted, key stakeholders are concerned that the framework fails to go far enough in identifying and analyzing historical and current inequities, as well as ensuring equitable outcomes going forward.

Adaptation & Resilience

Ensure equitable disaster preparation and response

Some Progress

The Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment's draft Climate Equity Framework lists 6 key principles in order to promote equity, including equitable representation in relation to climate policies. However, as previously noted, key stakeholders are concerned that the framework fails to go far enough in identifying and analyzing historical and current inequities, as well as ensuring equitable outcomes going forward.

Adaptation & Resilience

Ensure equitable disaster preparation and response

Some Progress

The Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment's draft Climate Equity Framework lists 6 key principles in order to promote equity, including equitable representation in relation to climate policies. However, as previously noted, key stakeholders are concerned that the framework fails to go far enough in identifying and analyzing historical and current inequities, as well as ensuring equitable outcomes going forward.

Adaptation & Resilience

Ensure equitable disaster preparation and response

Some Progress

The Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment's draft Climate Equity Framework lists 6 key principles in order to promote equity, including equitable representation in relation to climate policies. However, as previously noted, key stakeholders are concerned that the framework fails to go far enough in identifying and analyzing historical and current inequities, as well as ensuring equitable outcomes going forward.

Adaptation & Resilience

Ensure equitable disaster preparation and response

Some Progress

The Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment's draft Climate Equity Framework lists 6 key principles in order to promote equity, including equitable representation in relation to climate policies. However, as previously noted, key stakeholders are concerned that the framework fails to go far enough in identifying and analyzing historical and current inequities, as well as ensuring equitable outcomes going forward.

Adaptation & Resilience

Ensure equitable disaster preparation and response

Some Progress

The Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment's draft Climate Equity Framework lists 6 key principles in order to promote equity, including equitable representation in relation to climate policies. However, as previously noted, key stakeholders are concerned that the framework fails to go far enough in identifying and analyzing historical and current inequities, as well as ensuring equitable outcomes going forward.

Adaptation & Resilience

Ensure equitable disaster preparation and response

Some Progress

The Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment's draft Climate Equity Framework lists 6 key principles in order to promote equity, including equitable representation in relation to climate policies. However, as previously noted, key stakeholders are concerned that the framework fails to go far enough in identifying and analyzing historical and current inequities, as well as ensuring equitable outcomes going forward.

Reduce Reliance on Fossil Fuels

Adopt economy-wide greenhouse gas reduction targets

Significant Progress

HB1261 (2019) set targets to reduce Colorado's carbon emissions 26% by 2025, 50% by 2030, and 90% by 2050 relative to 2005 levels, which will boost the state's clean energy economy and create high-quality jobs. However, key stakeholders have found that Colorado doesn't appear to be on track to hitting many of these targets.

Reduce Reliance on Fossil Fuels

Adopt economy-wide greenhouse gas reduction targets

Significant Progress

HB1261 (2019) set targets to reduce Colorado's carbon emissions 26% by 2025, 50% by 2030, and 90% by 2050 relative to 2005 levels, which will boost the state's clean energy economy and create high-quality jobs. However, key stakeholders have found that Colorado doesn't appear to be on track to hitting many of these targets.

Reduce Reliance on Fossil Fuels

Adopt economy-wide greenhouse gas reduction targets

Significant Progress

HB1261 (2019) set targets to reduce Colorado's carbon emissions 26% by 2025, 50% by 2030, and 90% by 2050 relative to 2005 levels, which will boost the state's clean energy economy and create high-quality jobs. However, key stakeholders have found that Colorado doesn't appear to be on track to hitting many of these targets.

Reduce Reliance on Fossil Fuels

Adopt economy-wide greenhouse gas reduction targets

Significant Progress

HB1261 (2019) set targets to reduce Colorado's carbon emissions 26% by 2025, 50% by 2030, and 90% by 2050 relative to 2005 levels, which will boost the state's clean energy economy and create high-quality jobs. However, key stakeholders have found that Colorado doesn't appear to be on track to hitting many of these targets.

Reduce Reliance on Fossil Fuels

Adopt economy-wide greenhouse gas reduction targets

Significant Progress

HB1261 (2019) set targets to reduce Colorado's carbon emissions 26% by 2025, 50% by 2030, and 90% by 2050 relative to 2005 levels, which will boost the state's clean energy economy and create high-quality jobs. However, key stakeholders have found that Colorado doesn't appear to be on track to hitting many of these targets.

Reduce Reliance on Fossil Fuels

Adopt economy-wide greenhouse gas reduction targets

Significant Progress

HB1261 (2019) set targets to reduce Colorado's carbon emissions 26% by 2025, 50% by 2030, and 90% by 2050 relative to 2005 levels, which will boost the state's clean energy economy and create high-quality jobs. However, key stakeholders have found that Colorado doesn't appear to be on track to hitting many of these targets.

Reduce Reliance on Fossil Fuels

Adopt economy-wide greenhouse gas reduction targets

Significant Progress

HB1261 (2019) set targets to reduce Colorado's carbon emissions 26% by 2025, 50% by 2030, and 90% by 2050 relative to 2005 levels, which will boost the state's clean energy economy and create high-quality jobs. However, key stakeholders have found that Colorado doesn't appear to be on track to hitting many of these targets.

Reduce Reliance on Fossil Fuels

Adopt economy-wide greenhouse gas reduction targets

Significant Progress

HB1261 (2019) set targets to reduce Colorado's carbon emissions 26% by 2025, 50% by 2030, and 90% by 2050 relative to 2005 levels, which will boost the state's clean energy economy and create high-quality jobs. However, key stakeholders have found that Colorado doesn't appear to be on track to hitting many of these targets.

Reduce Reliance on Fossil Fuels

Adopt economy-wide greenhouse gas reduction targets

Significant Progress

HB1261 (2019) set targets to reduce Colorado's carbon emissions 26% by 2025, 50% by 2030, and 90% by 2050 relative to 2005 levels, which will boost the state's clean energy economy and create high-quality jobs. However, key stakeholders have found that Colorado doesn't appear to be on track to hitting many of these targets.

Reduce Reliance on Fossil Fuels

Limit construction of new fossil fuel generation and close coal resources

Little or No Progress

Unlike other states, Colorado has not banned fracking or coal.

Reduce Reliance on Fossil Fuels

Limit construction of new fossil fuel generation and close coal resources

Little or No Progress

Unlike other states, Colorado has not banned fracking or coal.

Reduce Reliance on Fossil Fuels

Limit construction of new fossil fuel generation and close coal resources

Little or No Progress